Author Topic: Chocolate & Chili  (Read 2137 times)

Offline FaradayUncaged

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Re: Chocolate & Chili
« Reply #15 on: April 19, 2016, 12:07:13 PM »
We use quite a bit of Aleppo pepper at home (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aleppo_pepper) and I've been seriously considering using it in something soon.  Perhaps a porter or stout...

Quote
The Aleppo pepper has a moderate heat level of about 10,000 on the Scoville scale,[4][5] with some fruitiness and mild, cumin-like undertones. Its flavor is similar to the ancho chile, but oilier and slightly salty; salt is often used in the drying process.[2] It is fairly mild, with its heat building slowly, with a fruity raisin-like flavor. It has also been described as having the flavor of "sweetness, roundness and perfume of the best kind of sundried tomatoes, but with a substantial kick behind it."[6]

Offline homoeccentricus

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Re: Chocolate & Chili
« Reply #16 on: April 19, 2016, 12:39:26 PM »
We use quite a bit of Aleppo pepper at home (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aleppo_pepper) and I've been seriously considering using it in something soon.  Perhaps a porter or stout...

Aleppo pepper is fantastic. But unfortunately very difficult to find in Belgium. Imported a small pot from Canada once. One day we had a guest and after I had explained how exquisite, rare and expensive the pepper was, he simply emptied it on his plate. :(

Which doesn't mean I would put it in beer. That would be sinful.
Frank P.

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Offline FaradayUncaged

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Re: Chocolate & Chili
« Reply #17 on: April 19, 2016, 12:47:37 PM »
We use quite a bit of Aleppo pepper at home (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aleppo_pepper) and I've been seriously considering using it in something soon.  Perhaps a porter or stout...

Aleppo pepper is fantastic. But unfortunately very difficult to find in Belgium. Imported a small pot from Canada once. One day we had a guest and after I had explained how exquisite, rare and expensive the pepper was, he simply emptied it on his plate. :(

Which doesn't mean I would put it in beer. That would be sinful.

I feel for you, as it's easier to come by in the colonies apparently.  It was life changing to put it on pizza for the first time. :)

From what I read it contains more oils than ancho or the like so it may not be a great candidate from that alone.  But I do think the flavor could work quite well with the right recipe.

Offline Hand of Dom

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Re: Chocolate & Chili
« Reply #18 on: April 19, 2016, 01:26:45 PM »
We use quite a bit of Aleppo pepper at home (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aleppo_pepper) and I've been seriously considering using it in something soon.  Perhaps a porter or stout...

Aleppo pepper is fantastic. But unfortunately very difficult to find in Belgium. Imported a small pot from Canada once. One day we had a guest and after I had explained how exquisite, rare and expensive the pepper was, he simply emptied it on his plate. :(

Which doesn't mean I would put it in beer. That would be sinful.

Not sure how much it would cost to ship to Belgium from the UK, but it's bound to be less than from Canada.

http://foratasteofpersia.co.uk/shop/food/aleppo-pepper-aka-pul-biber-aka-turkish-pepper-flakes/
Dom

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Currently fermenting - Pale ale 1 - 2017

Offline euge

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Re: Chocolate & Chili
« Reply #19 on: April 19, 2016, 04:07:05 PM »
Haven't been able to find Aleppo pepper locally the last year or so which I think is due to the crisis in Syria.
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Offline homoeccentricus

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Re: Chocolate & Chili
« Reply #20 on: April 19, 2016, 05:00:59 PM »
I think it's mostly produced in Turkey, no? I need to have this so will do a tour of the Turkish shops in Antwerp.
Frank P.

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Offline euge

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Re: Chocolate & Chili
« Reply #21 on: April 19, 2016, 05:09:38 PM »
Syria and Turkey region. Aleppo is in Syria and their part of the production has been affected.

http://theplate.nationalgeographic.com/2014/05/16/a-brutal-war-destroys-a-city-and-a-spice/
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Laws are spider-webs, which catch the little flies, but cannot hold the big ones. -Anacharsis

Offline FaradayUncaged

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Re: Chocolate & Chili
« Reply #22 on: April 19, 2016, 07:16:54 PM »
We buy ours, and most of our spices, from a local Penzey's which apparently sells Aleppo from Turkey:
https://www.penzeys.com/catalog/product.aspx?catalog=24&product=878

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Offline unclebrazzie

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Re: Chocolate & Chili
« Reply #24 on: April 20, 2016, 08:51:02 AM »
We use quite a bit of Aleppo pepper at home (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aleppo_pepper) and I've been seriously considering using it in something soon.  Perhaps a porter or stout...

Quote
The Aleppo pepper has a moderate heat level of about 10,000 on the Scoville scale,[4][5] with some fruitiness and mild, cumin-like undertones. Its flavor is similar to the ancho chile, but oilier and slightly salty; salt is often used in the drying process.[2] It is fairly mild, with its heat building slowly, with a fruity raisin-like flavor. It has also been described as having the flavor of "sweetness, roundness and perfume of the best kind of sundried tomatoes, but with a substantial kick behind it."[6]

How radically different is Aleppo from Espelette?
I have some of the latter, and it makes a great sprinkle on pizza, lasagna, and whatnot. Description seems to fit Aleppo's Wikipediaquote.
All truth is fiction.
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Offline FaradayUncaged

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Re: Chocolate & Chili
« Reply #25 on: April 20, 2016, 11:26:17 AM »
We use quite a bit of Aleppo pepper at home (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aleppo_pepper) and I've been seriously considering using it in something soon.  Perhaps a porter or stout...

Quote
The Aleppo pepper has a moderate heat level of about 10,000 on the Scoville scale,[4][5] with some fruitiness and mild, cumin-like undertones. Its flavor is similar to the ancho chile, but oilier and slightly salty; salt is often used in the drying process.[2] It is fairly mild, with its heat building slowly, with a fruity raisin-like flavor. It has also been described as having the flavor of "sweetness, roundness and perfume of the best kind of sundried tomatoes, but with a substantial kick behind it."[6]

How radically different is Aleppo from Espelette?
I have some of the latter, and it makes a great sprinkle on pizza, lasagna, and whatnot. Description seems to fit Aleppo's Wikipediaquote.

I've never had Espelette, but now I want to find some.

This site makes Espelette sounds more similar to paprika, but it does list Aleppo as a substitute:
http://www.pepperscale.com/espelette-pepper-substitute/

More on Aleppo:
http://www.seriouseats.com/2010/07/spice-hunting-aleppo-chile.html