Author Topic: Yeast cake at bottom of primary  (Read 3593 times)

Offline ynotbrusum

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 4081
Re: Yeast cake at bottom of primary
« Reply #30 on: April 18, 2016, 04:54:48 PM »
For what it is worth, I had a two year old slurry in the back of the fridge in a plastic tub with a loose lid and a paper towel as a "filter-like" medium with an inch or so of beer on top of the yeast cake.  Other than some dead yeast at the topmost part of the slurry, it was without any infection and as I pored it out to make room for a fresh slurry to take its place, I was amazed that it smelled so fresh.  I wouldn't re-pitch it, of course, but I would not hesitate making a starter using it in that condition.  I would also say that when handling yeast - try to have everything to be used in the process all laid out and work quickly with open containers containing yeast to avoid airborne contaminants getting in the medium. 

There is nothing worse than discovering a defect on a beer from which a slurry was harvested and already re-pitched, because then you have two batches affected...I've learned the hard way.  Some defects don't show up right away and get intolerable with time.  It doesn't prevent me from re-pitching, it just makes me cautious about cleaning, sanitizing and transferring.
Hodge Garage Brewing: "Brew with a glad heart!"

Offline SPAMR

  • Cellarman
  • **
  • Posts: 32
Re: Yeast cake at bottom of primary
« Reply #31 on: April 18, 2016, 08:47:49 PM »
The yeast will compact as it cools. I normally get 200-300 ml of thick slurry from a 1.040-1.050 batch.

Right on the money Stevie. 200ml combined between both jars once the yeast compacted in the fridge.

I should use both of these on my next batch, correct?

Any need for a starter?

Offline ynotbrusum

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 4081
Re: Yeast cake at bottom of primary
« Reply #32 on: April 18, 2016, 09:44:52 PM »
Don't use both - if you are re-pitching within about 2 weeks then maybe up to a whole jar, but really just a third or so of the total harvested for ales.  Half for lagers in that time frame.  If more time passes, then more yeast should be pitched or make a starter from the harvested yeast.
Hodge Garage Brewing: "Brew with a glad heart!"