Author Topic: Timing of Dry Hopping  (Read 1658 times)

Offline BEAGLEBREWINGCO

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Timing of Dry Hopping
« on: April 23, 2016, 11:39:01 PM »
Hi Everyone,

I'm interested in recommendations around dry hopping and any science as to the consequences or outcomes. For example - I just completed an American Pale but realised I added the Centennial hops for the dry hopping stage immediately after cooling the wort and pitching the yeast. That means my "dry hops" have sat through the entire fermentation process whereas on re-reading the recipe it seems I was meant to pitch these at the end of the initial fermentation. I'm very comfortable that I will still have a very drinkable beer but just wondering what the known science if the timing of these additions is ?

For example -
1)does later addition of dry hops mean better / truer hop odour and flavour ?
2) does early addition develop any off or other flavours due to extended reaction time ?

I have tasted my beer before bottling and at least before bottle conditioning it appears to have a flat middle zone before a lovely Centennial finish - your thoughts and science appreciated - cheers

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Timing of Dry Hopping
« Reply #1 on: April 24, 2016, 12:39:21 AM »
The timing of dry hopping is debated regularly here so you'll get lots of different responses, none of them right or wrong. Meaning dry hopping is pretty subjective. Some people like to dry hop as fermentation winds down, some in secondary as the beer gets more clear, others dry hop in the keg. At room temp/fermentation temp, you'll extract the dry hop goodness in 3-5 days IMO, with a longer extraction period if the beer is colder. I'll tell you what I do - not saying it's better or worse than other methods, it's what I like best. After fermentation I give the beer sufficient time in primary to drop the vast majority of yeast out of suspension. Yeast absorb hop oils, so beers dry hopped with a lot of yeast in suspension tend to have a drop off in aroma as the yeast drop out. I feel that aromas last longer when the beer is dry hopped when fairly clear. I rack the beer into a purged keg with dry hops (contained in a fine mesh nylon bag) in the bottom, wait 3 days @ room temp with head pressure on the keg, then chill and finish carbing.
The practice of dry hopping is really worth experimenting to see what you like best. Pretty much all methods make good beer.
Jon H.

Offline BEAGLEBREWINGCO

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Re: Timing of Dry Hopping
« Reply #2 on: April 24, 2016, 03:05:33 AM »
After fermentation I give the beer sufficient time in primary to drop the vast majority of yeast out of suspension. Yeast absorb hop oils, so beers dry hopped with a lot of yeast in suspension tend to have a drop off in aroma as the yeast drop out. I feel that aromas last longer when the beer is dry hopped when fairly clear. I rack the beer into a purged keg with dry hops (contained in a fine mesh nylon bag) in the bottom, wait 3 days @ room temp with head pressure on the keg, then chill and finish carbing.
The practice of dry hopping is really worth experimenting to see what you like best. Pretty much all methods make good beer.

Thanks Hoosier I'll try that once I get my kegs up and running - cheers

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Timing of Dry Hopping
« Reply #3 on: April 24, 2016, 03:07:29 AM »
After fermentation I give the beer sufficient time in primary to drop the vast majority of yeast out of suspension. Yeast absorb hop oils, so beers dry hopped with a lot of yeast in suspension tend to have a drop off in aroma as the yeast drop out. I feel that aromas last longer when the beer is dry hopped when fairly clear. I rack the beer into a purged keg with dry hops (contained in a fine mesh nylon bag) in the bottom, wait 3 days @ room temp with head pressure on the keg, then chill and finish carbing.
The practice of dry hopping is really worth experimenting to see what you like best. Pretty much all methods make good beer.

Thanks Hoosier I'll try that once I get my kegs up and running - cheers


Be sure to post what you think. Good luck!
Jon H.

Offline PAYCHECK

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Re: Timing of Dry Hopping
« Reply #4 on: April 28, 2016, 10:19:28 PM »
The timing of dry hopping is debated regularly here so you'll get lots of different responses, none of them right or wrong. Meaning dry hopping is pretty subjective. Some people like to dry hop as fermentation winds down, some in secondary as the beer gets more clear, others dry hop in the keg. At room temp/fermentation temp, you'll extract the dry hop goodness in 3-5 days IMO, with a longer extraction period if the beer is colder. I'll tell you what I do - not saying it's better or worse than other methods, it's what I like best. After fermentation I give the beer sufficient time in primary to drop the vast majority of yeast out of suspension. Yeast absorb hop oils, so beers dry hopped with a lot of yeast in suspension tend to have a drop off in aroma as the yeast drop out. I feel that aromas last longer when the beer is dry hopped when fairly clear. I rack the beer into a purged keg with dry hops (contained in a fine mesh nylon bag) in the bottom, wait 3 days @ room temp with head pressure on the keg, then chill and finish carbing.
The practice of dry hopping is really worth experimenting to see what you like best. Pretty much all methods make good beer.

I personally have always don dry hopping or dry herbing at the end of fermentation after I have harvested my yeast and dumped the trub.  I find that longer periods of dry hopping really have not had any noticeable difference after the 5-7 day mark.  AS a matter of fact I dry hoped an IPA with Mosaic and got sent on a business trip where I was gone for two weeks, when i returned I filtered the beer and did not notice any significant increase in aroma from a one week dry hopping I had done previously.  Where I notice significant changes is with obviously the actual hops being used and the amount.

Good luck
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Offline simonh82

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Re: Timing of Dry Hopping
« Reply #5 on: May 06, 2016, 09:56:53 AM »
Most people dry hop when active fermentation has finished, or at least winding down.  If you dry hop at the beginning of the fermentation the CO2 produced will carry off a lot of the hop aroma.

I have dry hopped for up to 14 days, without any of the grassy flavours that people have said are possible.  Personally, I think I have noted an improvement in hop flavour and aroma when dry hopping for 10 days as opposed to 3-4 days.

Offline coolman26

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Re: Timing of Dry Hopping
« Reply #6 on: May 08, 2016, 09:38:25 PM »
I too dry hop after the beer has been in primary for 2 weeks. Most of the yeast has dropped by then. I'm going to bags and in the keg this time. I've tried every way possible. I like to dry hop for 5 days. I used to do 3 days and add an oz or 2 for 2 days. Now I'm a 4 oz, 5days, in 5 gallon guy.


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Offline ynotbrusum

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Re: Timing of Dry Hopping
« Reply #7 on: May 11, 2016, 04:02:22 AM »
Firestone Walker dry hops in the primary, I believe - well before final gravity.
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Offline denny

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Re: Timing of Dry Hopping
« Reply #8 on: May 11, 2016, 06:20:36 PM »
Firestone Walker dry hops in the primary, I believe - well before final gravity.

Yep, which is just more proof that there is no single "right" or "best" way to do it.  Try different methods and see what works for you.
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