Author Topic: The Gelatin Effect - Pt. 4: Standard Amount vs. A Lot | exBEERiment Results!  (Read 2665 times)

Offline brulosopher

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For those of us who prefer our beer clear, gelatin is an incredible resource-- simple, cheap, and very effective! Inspired by a conversation with John Palmer, I was curious if the amount of gelatin used to fine would have an impact and so we put it to the test. Results are in!

http://brulosophy.com/2016/04/25/the-gelatin-effect-pt-4-standard-vs-a-lot-exbeeriment-results/

Offline hopfenundmalz

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Nice write up.
Jeff Rankert
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Offline brewinhard

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Now I am curious about lower amounts of gelatin vs. normal 1/2 tsp. levels.

Offline dmtaylor

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European Amber Lager, eh?  Adding recipe to my database for safe keeping!  Congrats!
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Offline beersk

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This is very interesting. I've had success using 1T for a 5 gallon batch, it clears SUPER bright. But I've also been questioning whether it strips something else from the beer, proteins influencing body and mouth feel. The beers seemed to turn thin. I never seemed to notice this without using gelatin or using smaller amounts. That's what I was hoping this was going to be testing as well.
I am now playing with a lower amount, 1t for 5 gallons for beers I want to clear faster.
die Schönheit der bier...

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Offline brulosopher

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Now I am curious about lower amounts of gelatin vs. normal 1/2 tsp. levels.

Me too! Perhaps I'll try 1/4 tsp in my next batch.

Offline Hooper

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I do not like the idea of adding water to my beer at this point. I heat the beer from the hydrometer jar and about a tsp of gelatin to add to 5 gals (not cold crashed) in the keg at kegging. It seems to work very well...
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Offline blair.streit

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I do not like the idea of adding water to my beer at this point. I heat the beer from the hydrometer jar and about a tsp of gelatin to add to 5 gals (not cold crashed) in the keg at kegging. It seems to work very well...
Curious - are you concerned about contamination by adding water or dilution? This got me thinking so I did some quick math.

5 gallons is about 640oz, or 40 pints. The 1/4 cup water recommended is 2oz, which when divided by 40 is 0.05oz or 1.47mL per pint. I'm guessing nobody could pick the 1.5mL diluted pint in a triangle test, but to me it's helpful to think about that when trying to determine if it bothers me.

Offline brulosopher

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I do not like the idea of adding water to my beer at this point. I heat the beer from the hydrometer jar and about a tsp of gelatin to add to 5 gals (not cold crashed) in the keg at kegging. It seems to work very well...
I'm guessing nobody could pick the 1.5mL diluted pint in a triangle test...

They weren't able to when I first tested it out: http://brulosophy.com/2015/01/05/the-gelatin-effect-exbeeriment-results/

Offline HoosierBrew

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Now I am curious about lower amounts of gelatin vs. normal 1/2 tsp. levels.

Me too! Perhaps I'll try 1/4 tsp in my next batch.


Yeah, I'd be curious to see a lower end threshold for clearing, too. Thanks for the write up!
Jon H.

Offline Hand of Dom

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Do you think that the increased density of the large gelatin addition had any bearing on the fact that it all seemed to solidify, and not as much was available to clear the beer?  Would it be worth rerunning with the large addition diluted to the same percentage as your small addition?
Dom

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Currently fermenting - Pale ale 1 - 2017

Offline zwiller

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Thanks again for posting and doing these.  Semi OT - seeing alot of you are lager brewers, is it pretty much a "gimme" that you need to fine lagers?  My ales end up bright on their own but my recent lager I did is still very hazy about a month on tap (3470).  That's very unusual for me but I am just getting into lagers thanks to the higher temp 3470 xbmt...     
Sam
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Offline brewinhard

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German tradition states that no fining agents be used in lager production.

With that being said, I don't think one needs to use fining agents to produce a clear lager. If you decide to go this route, an extended cold crash period prior to packaging may be in order to accelerate the clearing of the beer during the lagering period.

I brew quite a bit of lagers and I do (for the most part) gel fine them.  I feel that it brilliantly clears up the beer very quickly and can even make the beer more drinkable, earlier.

Offline charles1968

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I've used gelatin with successful results. It smells a bit like an abattoir, which is a bit alarming, but it's good to know even huge amounts don't affect the flavour.

It's worth bearing in mind that lots of brewers don't have space for a brew fridge to crash cool, fine or lager beer cold enough to remove chill haze. So any techniques or exbeeriments that reduce haze without the chilling stage would be of great interest to many brewers. The vorlauf experiment, for instance, seemed to show a dramatic improval in clarity after a very large vorlauf relative to a non-vorlaufed beer.

Offline MDixon

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Do you think that the increased density of the large gelatin addition had any bearing on the fact that it all seemed to solidify, and not as much was available to clear the beer?  Would it be worth rerunning with the large addition diluted to the same percentage as your small addition?

^^^^ THIS

I'm not sure the 10X amount was ever incorporated to do it's job, especially when there is a blob on the side of the carboy.
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