Author Topic: Yeast stopped at 1.025?  (Read 1747 times)

Offline WHollon

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Re: Yeast stopped at 1.025?
« Reply #15 on: April 27, 2016, 10:07:35 PM »
 I just ran another gravity test using the hydrometer and it's down to 1.003, so it's obviously finished. I had the understanding that the refractometer would read the gravity more accurately than the hydrometer, this is a major difference.

Offline denny

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Re: Yeast stopped at 1.025?
« Reply #16 on: April 27, 2016, 10:11:03 PM »
YAHTZEE!

Post fermentation is best measured with a hydrometer. If you are using a refractometer, you need to use a calculator to get an accurate reading. Sean Terrill has one that many hold in high regard, but others seem to be ok as well. I linked Sean's below.

http://seanterrill.com/2012/01/06/refractometer-calculator/

Good thinking, Stevie!
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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Offline Stevie

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Yeast stopped at 1.025?
« Reply #17 on: April 27, 2016, 10:19:26 PM »
I just ran another gravity test using the hydrometer and it's down to 1.003, so it's obviously finished. I had the understanding that the refractometer would read the gravity more accurately than the hydrometer, this is a major difference.
Not so. They are good for sugar but get all jacked when alcohol is present. I have also read that refractometers that are dual scale (brix and sg) are not accurate when it comes to the SG scale as it isn't a true 1:4 ratio. Cheaper refractometers are also not as reliable in my experience. I have one that will read different from sample to sample, but it sounds like yours is consistent!

Edit to add - Hydrometers are calibrated at a given temperature and require a calculation to get the true value. Every hydrometer I have used is calibrated at 60°, but I hear there are some that are calibrated at 68°. Either way, it should be printed on the scale.

To make your life even worse, hydrometers aren't always accurate and require testing in distilled/DI/RO water at the proper temp to see how far off it is if at all. In my opinion, this only matters if you are using multiple hydrometers. If a hydrometer is off, the difference between OG and FG will still be constant, just not as accurate.
« Last Edit: April 27, 2016, 10:25:14 PM by Stevie »

Offline WHollon

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Re: Yeast stopped at 1.025?
« Reply #18 on: April 27, 2016, 10:24:06 PM »
My post doesn't appear to have shown up yet, when I retested with a hydrometer it showed 1.003 and the yeast did it's job. I'm going to move on to the bottling phase with confidence that it should be relatively good beer with a ABV of around 5.1%.

Thanks for the information regarding refractometers, my only question now is why would I continue to use it now that I know it can't be used directly after fermentation starts?

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Yeast stopped at 1.025?
« Reply #19 on: April 27, 2016, 10:26:07 PM »
my only question now is why would I continue to use it now that I know it can't be used directly after fermentation starts?


I use mine for preboil and postboil OG measurements, but a hydro for FG readings FWIW.
Jon H.

Offline Stevie

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Re: Yeast stopped at 1.025?
« Reply #20 on: April 27, 2016, 10:29:43 PM »
My post doesn't appear to have shown up yet, when I retested with a hydrometer it showed 1.003 and the yeast did it's job. I'm going to move on to the bottling phase with confidence that it should be relatively good beer with a ABV of around 5.1%.

Thanks for the information regarding refractometers, my only question now is why would I continue to use it now that I know it can't be used directly after fermentation starts?
I use mine to check progress and adjust with a calculator. I made a cider for my wife and wanted to stop it at 5.5% ABV. I was able to do this with my refractometer daily where a full sample for a hydrometer every day for four days would be 1-2 pints. I use a hydrometer for the final measurement to ensure accuracy. I know some that always use a refractometer, and I maybe would if I had faith in my POS $20 Amazon special.