Author Topic: W-34/70 Equivalents?  (Read 7552 times)

Offline narvin

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Re: W-34/70 Equivalents?
« Reply #15 on: May 08, 2016, 05:08:50 PM »
I routinely meet brewers who treat a starter like a small batch of beer when the goal of making a starter is to maximize viable yeast biomass and cell health.   Allowing a starter to ferment out before pitching the cells is treating a starter like a small batch of beer.


This confuses me, because I've heard from many that yeast does not perform at its best until fermented in a batch of beer for a generation or two (and also found it true in my own experience).

Offline Saccharomyces

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Re: W-34/70 Equivalents?
« Reply #16 on: May 09, 2016, 04:32:58 AM »
This confuses me, because I've heard from many that yeast does not perform at its best until fermented in a batch of beer for a generation or two (and also found it true in my own experience).

Making a starter and making a batch of beer are different goals. The goal of a starter to take a small amount of yeast and grow it into a larger amount of yeast (i.e., increase the yeast biomass) while protecting its health.  Time and time again, I see people commenting on the improved performance of the the shaken, not stirred method.  The magic is not in the shaking.  The shaking is a poor man's O2 bottle and diffusion stone. The magic is the result of not stressing the cells and pitching at high krausen.

With that said, the reason why culture improves when repitching is not based solely on number of generations the culture has been propagated.  It is based on the number of generations under real-world brewing conditions in one's brewery.  The culture improves because the wheat gets sorted from the chaff cell-wise, and the culture becomes acclimated to the environment.   It's Darwinism applied to brewing.

Offline dilluh98

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Re: W-34/70 Equivalents?
« Reply #17 on: May 09, 2016, 03:32:38 PM »
What about when you are continually repitching yeast into different recipes? Yeast are not under the same stress in a batch of ordinary bitter than it will when I pitch it into an east coast IPA a few generations down the road. Does this include being able to acclimate (or not) to house microflora load over time?