Author Topic: Brewtan B  (Read 105297 times)

Offline natebrews

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 484
Re: Brewtan B
« Reply #795 on: October 18, 2016, 06:22:09 pm »
Ok, that is simple enough...I'm still wondering about the chilling part (unless "going to the spund" is a term I'm not familiar with)
Risk of failure should be no deterrent to trying.

The Beerery

  • Guest
Re: Brewtan B
« Reply #796 on: October 18, 2016, 06:25:46 pm »
Ok, that is simple enough...I'm still wondering about the chilling part (unless "going to the spund" is a term I'm not familiar with)

Oh I'm sorry. I use a SS counterflow chiller.

Offline natebrews

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 484
Re: Brewtan B
« Reply #797 on: October 18, 2016, 06:29:42 pm »
Thanks.  Do you know of anyone that uses an immersion with this method successfully?  It certainly doesn't seem to lend itself to the method, but the immersion/whirlpool chiller is superb if you need to drop the wort temp fast (as in, to stop SMM turning to DMS or alpha acid isomerization).  I could see if maybe a very gentle whirlpool was used, maybe run CO2 into the headspace of the kettle with the lid on.  It doesn't take much movement to make the chilling work (or to exchange the surface and allow for oxygen pickup for that matter).
Risk of failure should be no deterrent to trying.

Offline Stevie

  • Official Poobah of No Life. (I Got Ban Hammered by Drew)
  • *********
  • Posts: 6858
Re: Brewtan B
« Reply #798 on: October 18, 2016, 06:35:11 pm »
Links for the chiller? Most I've seen are copper core.

The Beerery

  • Guest
Re: Brewtan B
« Reply #799 on: October 18, 2016, 06:44:04 pm »
Links for the chiller? Most I've seen are copper core.
It an older model that Williams brewing used to sell. It Was all SS. Looks like they are not selling them anymore.

Big Monk

  • Guest
Re: Brewtan B
« Reply #800 on: October 18, 2016, 06:47:32 pm »
Links for the chiller? Most I've seen are copper core.
It an older model that Williams brewing used to sell. It Was all SS. Looks like they are not selling them anymore.

I'm my recent searches for TC fittings I've seen plenty of all stainless CFCs with TC fittings for connections.

Offline Phil_M

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1760
  • Southern Maryland
Re: Brewtan B
« Reply #801 on: October 18, 2016, 06:48:45 pm »
Links for the chiller? Most I've seen are copper core.
It an older model that Williams brewing used to sell. It Was all SS. Looks like they are not selling them anymore.

Yeah, a counterflow chiller is the long pole in the tent for me eliminating copper. I like to brew lagers in 10 gallon batches, to minimize "waste" in my freezer. I'm not waiting on an immersion chiller to get that much wort down to pitching temps. The therminator is a beast, but it's brazed with copper.

Links for the chiller? Most I've seen are copper core.
It an older model that Williams brewing used to sell. It Was all SS. Looks like they are not selling them anymore.

I'm my recent searches for TC fittings I've seen plenty of all stainless CFCs with TC fittings for connections.

At what price point? I know a lot of small breweries have TC stainless chillers, but they likely cost more than my entire system.
Corn is a fine adjunct in beer.

And don't buy stale beer.

Big Monk

  • Guest
Re: Brewtan B
« Reply #802 on: October 18, 2016, 07:07:38 pm »
I don't have exact numbers but they aren't cheap.

Offline natebrews

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 484
Re: Brewtan B
« Reply #803 on: October 18, 2016, 07:10:12 pm »
Hm, I was thinking about this some since I have a copper chiller.  It isn't very hard to nickel plate copper with common stuff....
Risk of failure should be no deterrent to trying.

Offline Stevie

  • Official Poobah of No Life. (I Got Ban Hammered by Drew)
  • *********
  • Posts: 6858
Re: Brewtan B
« Reply #804 on: October 18, 2016, 10:23:21 pm »
Links for the chiller? Most I've seen are copper core.
It an older model that Williams brewing used to sell. It Was all SS. Looks like they are not selling them anymore.
Bummer. I'm not in the market now as is, so no worries. I have seen one from china that has some fuggly welds. I'd likely just make one out of garden hose and stainless tubing.

Offline homoeccentricus

  • Brewmaster General
  • *******
  • Posts: 2009
  • A twerp from Antwerp
Re: Brewtan B
« Reply #805 on: October 19, 2016, 01:36:53 am »
Speidel sells stainless chillers to go with the Braumeister.
Frank P.

Staggering on the shoulders of giant dwarfs.

Offline narvin

  • I spend way too much time on the AHA forum
  • ********
  • Posts: 2716
Re: Brewtan B
« Reply #806 on: October 19, 2016, 08:33:06 am »
Once I get some Brewtan I'm going to compare the results to using smb and preboiling.  But, I have a therminator and a copper pickup tube in the kettle, and I still saw some improvements on one batch in terms of wort darkening and smoothness and improved lagering time.  Nothing scientific, and I didn't correct for the pH drop from the smb, so I hit a lower level than normal.  But it's enough to make me suggest you try it even without removing copper.

Offline ynotbrusum

  • Official Poobah of No Life. (I Got Ban Hammered by Drew)
  • *********
  • Posts: 4387
Re: Brewtan B
« Reply #807 on: October 19, 2016, 11:47:22 am »
Brewtan on order and I hope to get a lager done for Christmas using both Brewtan and low oxy (not wholly, but pretty close).  I want to try the pre-yeasting approach.  That seems very do-able on my system....
Hodge Garage Brewing: "Brew with a glad heart!"

Offline brewinhard

  • Official Poobah of No Life. (I Got Ban Hammered by Drew)
  • *********
  • Posts: 3272
Re: Brewtan B
« Reply #808 on: October 19, 2016, 12:39:34 pm »
Remember all. You don't HAVE to preboil. The yeast method is a very valid and easy solution.


http://forum.germanbrewing.net/viewtopic.php?f=50&t=355

Yes, I am intrigued by this method.

I have another question for those of you doing low DO methods....Does this process benefit ALL styles of beer including ales, or just more delicate styles like lagers and kolsch?

I am working my way to a much needed upgrade in my system after about 12 years of brewing and would possibly consider putting together a system that would benefit from this process if all styles of beer would see improvements. I only ask this simply because I saw another post in this thread of someone who was performing Low DO brewing and indicated that he did see improvements in his lagers, but did not care for the fresh "nose in the grain bag" aroma/flavor he got from it for his ales.  Thoughts?
I will never brew another beer without using the low oxygen techniques. Everyone I have had try my pale ales and the like nearly fall over. The clarity of the hops and malt is amazing.

Great!  I brew all styles of beer so, that had to be a must for me. Thanks!

Offline Phil_M

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1760
  • Southern Maryland
Re: Brewtan B
« Reply #809 on: October 19, 2016, 12:47:53 pm »
I do agree that some beers are still going to need oxidation to taste "right". British styles come readily to mind, mine never taste quite right until they've sat in the keg and oxidized ever so slightly. Takes the edge off all the different flavors and helps them meld together.

I'd love to see how a low O2 barelywine ages though. O2 will get to it eventually, but will it behave differently when it does?

I think my mantra from here on out is going to be to try and most accurately recreate the original brewery's conditions. I have an idea for a "Yorkshire Circle" for English beer, and I'd love to try and brew a Saison Dupont clone that follows their fermentation schedule/temps. German Macrobeer will get the low O2 treatment.
« Last Edit: October 19, 2016, 12:49:55 pm by Phil_M »
Corn is a fine adjunct in beer.

And don't buy stale beer.