Author Topic: High mash efficiency  (Read 952 times)

Offline juggabrew303

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High mash efficiency
« on: May 22, 2016, 05:38:53 PM »
Is this normal? I've never seen this before in my system. Measure both hydro and refrac. 1.060 and 1.057.  Mash PH 5.3



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Offline MDixon

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Re: High mash efficiency
« Reply #1 on: May 22, 2016, 05:57:01 PM »
Something is obviously wrong because the max is 100%. The error was either in volume, gravity, or the use of more grain than you thought.
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Offline denny

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Re: High mash efficiency
« Reply #2 on: May 22, 2016, 05:57:35 PM »
Got to be some sort of error somewhere because that's impossible!  Maybe volume measurement, maybe grain weights, maybe something esoteric like the wrong potentiual extract for a grain.
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Offline juggabrew303

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Re: High mash efficiency
« Reply #3 on: May 22, 2016, 10:16:24 PM »
Yup! Somethings wacky, my OG came out to 1.052.  I thought maybe my 1st running and sparge weren't completely mixed thoroughly?


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Offline MDixon

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Re: High mash efficiency
« Reply #4 on: May 23, 2016, 12:32:06 PM »
The post boil you measured 1.052? The gravity cannot go down from preboil, only up.

So the sample was higher in gravity than expected. Most refractometers will compensate for temp, but should be used at a particular temp for accuracy. The hydrometer needs to be corrected, but at a hotter temp than calibration points would need to be added.

Must be stratified wort and the gravity taken from an area of with a higher concentration of sugars.
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Offline Hand of Dom

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Re: High mash efficiency
« Reply #5 on: May 23, 2016, 01:00:46 PM »
My guess is stratified wort too, I panicked first time I used the GF, as my preboil gravity was about half of what I expected.  Turned out I'd taken the sample from the layer that contained the last bit of sparged wort (I'd never sparged before that).  I still finished below my expected numbers, but that was due to having milled my grain way too coarse fearing a stuck sparge.
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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: High mash efficiency
« Reply #6 on: May 23, 2016, 01:54:10 PM »
My guess is stratified wort too


+2.  I take my preboil reading a couple minutes into the boil, to get good mixing of the wort. I used to get stratified readings that were all over the place before. Since I started doing this, my readings have been much more consistent and accurate.
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Offline 69franx

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Re: High mash efficiency
« Reply #7 on: May 23, 2016, 04:32:36 PM »
My guess is stratified wort too


+2.  I take my preboil reading a couple minutes into the boil, to get good mixing of the wort. I used to get stratified readings that were all over the place before. Since I started doing this, my readings have been much more consistent and accurate.
A big +1
Frank L.
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