Author Topic: Confessions of NE IPA brewers  (Read 4504 times)


Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Confessions of NE IPA brewers
« Reply #1 on: May 27, 2016, 06:20:41 PM »
That is definitely some modified IPA. 'Green apple puree' and 'post fermentation fruit' explains the term 'juicy' a little better. I guess I'm not smart enough to understand specifically what wheat flour haze does to improve a beer. If I ever find one fresh I'll probably try it, to satisfy my curiosity.
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Offline 69franx

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Re: Confessions of NE IPA brewers
« Reply #2 on: May 27, 2016, 06:21:36 PM »
Thanks for posting
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Offline erockrph

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Re: Confessions of NE IPA brewers
« Reply #3 on: May 27, 2016, 06:25:32 PM »
I dunno, my IPA's are plenty hazy just from dry hops. My "NE IPA" that I brewed recently was just my usual IPA using 10% flaked oats and 10% torrified wheat. It came out opaque without any flour, pectin, fruit puree, etc.

It sounds like some breweries are going through awfully extreme measures for this...
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Offline dilluh98

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Re: Confessions of NE IPA brewers
« Reply #4 on: May 27, 2016, 06:45:16 PM »
Maybe the "grittiness" that Denny has commented on is coming from apple puree. I could definitely see that.

Offline denny

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Re: Confessions of NE IPA brewers
« Reply #5 on: May 27, 2016, 07:18:52 PM »
That is definitely some modified IPA. 'Green apple puree' and 'post fermentation fruit' explains the term 'juicy' a little better. I guess I'm not smart enough to understand specifically what wheat flour haze does to improve a beer. If I ever find one fresh I'll probably try it, to satisfy my curiosity.

If you guessed "nothing", then you're smart enough.
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Offline denny

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Re: Confessions of NE IPA brewers
« Reply #6 on: May 27, 2016, 07:19:26 PM »
Maybe the "grittiness" that Denny has commented on is coming from apple puree. I could definitely see that.

I really don't think so.  It was very likely either yeast or hops.
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Offline narvin

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Re: Confessions of NE IPA brewers
« Reply #7 on: May 27, 2016, 07:21:16 PM »
Why flour?  If you're a true farmhouse brewer you'd be using raw (whole grain) wheat berries, spelt, etc. in the mash.  But flour in the kettle?    >:(

Seems like a fad for people who like fads.
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Offline denny

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Re: Confessions of NE IPA brewers
« Reply #8 on: May 27, 2016, 07:24:14 PM »
Why flour?  If you're a true farmhouse brewer you'd be using raw (whole grain) wheat berries, spelt, etc. in the mash.  But flour in the kettle?    >:(

Seems like a fad for people who like fads.

That's what it is.  Years back, flour in the kettle was advocated as a way to keep witbier cloudy.
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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Confessions of NE IPA brewers
« Reply #9 on: May 27, 2016, 07:28:54 PM »
That is definitely some modified IPA. 'Green apple puree' and 'post fermentation fruit' explains the term 'juicy' a little better. I guess I'm not smart enough to understand specifically what wheat flour haze does to improve a beer. If I ever find one fresh I'll probably try it, to satisfy my curiosity.

If you guessed "nothing", then you're smart enough.


Nothing was exactly my guess, Denny.   :)
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Offline beersk

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Re: Confessions of NE IPA brewers
« Reply #10 on: May 27, 2016, 07:33:47 PM »
Why flour?  If you're a true farmhouse brewer you'd be using raw (whole grain) wheat berries, spelt, etc. in the mash.  But flour in the kettle?    >:(

Seems like a fad for people who like fads.
Oh and you can bet your boots that many of the people in the craft beer world are, in fact, people who like fads. [Patiently waits for sour beers, fruit IPA, and barrel-aged everything to slope off on holiday indefinitely...]. It'll go the way of black IPA soon enough. Although I was sad to see that fad go away, but no bother, I can brew it pretty easily.
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Offline brewinhard

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Re: Confessions of NE IPA brewers
« Reply #11 on: May 27, 2016, 07:37:27 PM »
Why flour?  If you're a true farmhouse brewer you'd be using raw (whole grain) wheat berries, spelt, etc. in the mash.  But flour in the kettle?    >:(

Seems like a fad for people who like fads.

That's what it is.  Years back, flour in the kettle was advocated as a way to keep witbier cloudy.

Yep. Years ago, I tried that once. Once.

Offline narvin

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Re: Confessions of NE IPA brewers
« Reply #12 on: May 27, 2016, 07:40:43 PM »
Why flour?  If you're a true farmhouse brewer you'd be using raw (whole grain) wheat berries, spelt, etc. in the mash.  But flour in the kettle?    >:(

Seems like a fad for people who like fads.
Oh and you can bet your boots that many of the people in the craft beer world are, in fact, people who like fads. [Patiently waits for sour beers, fruit IPA, and barrel-aged everything to slope off on holiday indefinitely...]. It'll go the way of black IPA soon enough. Although I was sad to see that fad go away, but no bother, I can brew it pretty easily.

All the original beers were sour.  How is that a fad?   ;)

I agree there are a lot of over the top sours out there, and part of that has to do with barrel aging in new(ish) barrels in the US. Oud Beersel has been using their barrels for 100+ years.  Trust me, there's no wine/tannic/whiskey flavor left in there.  Just some amazing yeast strains that taste better than the toilet water some breweries apparently cultured their bugs from.
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Offline narvin

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Re: Confessions of NE IPA brewers
« Reply #13 on: May 27, 2016, 07:41:26 PM »
Why flour?  If you're a true farmhouse brewer you'd be using raw (whole grain) wheat berries, spelt, etc. in the mash.  But flour in the kettle?    >:(

Seems like a fad for people who like fads.

That's what it is.  Years back, flour in the kettle was advocated as a way to keep witbier cloudy.

Yep. Years ago, I tried that once. Once.

I tried it once to hopefully make third runnings into suitable lambic wort.  Instead I made what looked like hush puppies.  I should have made a roux.
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Offline pete b

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Re: Confessions of NE IPA brewers
« Reply #14 on: May 27, 2016, 08:08:37 PM »
I don't like the idea of flour in the beer. I have my own take going right now with a half pound each of flaked oats and flaked barley that I put in the mash of a 5 gallon batch. Primary is just about done and I added freshly squeezed cranberries that I put through a macerating juicer, which is essentially cranberry puree. I also did a big whirlpool addition and put 3oz hops in with the cranberry puree in a large tea ball. I will put another teaball of hops in the keg. I didn't know about the fruit puree, that was kind of a hunch.
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