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Author Topic: Confessions of NE IPA brewers  (Read 12115 times)

Offline Biran

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Re: Confessions of NE IPA brewers
« Reply #15 on: May 27, 2016, 05:04:04 pm »
Flour in beer?  This is a thing?  It wouldn't drop out of solution?

Offline brewinhard

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Re: Confessions of NE IPA brewers
« Reply #16 on: May 27, 2016, 06:12:48 pm »
Not when added to the boil. Although, IIRC, it really didn't do too much for the "haze" thing either. The haze in witibiers really come mostly from the yeast hanging around in suspension.

Offline Biran

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Re: Confessions of NE IPA brewers
« Reply #17 on: May 27, 2016, 06:22:52 pm »
Not when added to the boil. Although, IIRC, it really didn't do too much for the "haze" thing either. The haze in witibiers really come mostly from the yeast hanging around in suspension.

That makes since.  For some reason I imagined it added like a dry hop.

Offline brewinhard

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Re: Confessions of NE IPA brewers
« Reply #18 on: May 28, 2016, 12:34:28 pm »
If it were done that way I would assume it would be a major food source for bacteria and wild yeast no matter how clean your sanitation regime is.

Offline jeffy

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Re: Confessions of NE IPA brewers
« Reply #19 on: May 28, 2016, 02:58:02 pm »
Not when added to the boil. Although, IIRC, it really didn't do too much for the "haze" thing either. The haze in witibiers really come mostly from the yeast hanging around in suspension.
Actually the haze in German Wheat beers is from yeast, the haze in Belgian Witbiers is from starch.
Jeff Gladish, Tampa (989.3, 175.1 Apparent Rennarian)
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Offline brewinhard

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Re: Confessions of NE IPA brewers
« Reply #20 on: May 28, 2016, 05:37:03 pm »
Not when added to the boil. Although, IIRC, it really didn't do too much for the "haze" thing either. The haze in witibiers really come mostly from the yeast hanging around in suspension.
Actually the haze in German Wheat beers is from yeast, the haze in Belgian Witbiers is from starch.

As in unconverted starches from the mash?  I don't see how that is possible unless they use straight unmalted wheat berries without any conversion (ie turbid mash, which I don't think witbier producers do, although I could be wrong).

narvin

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Re: Confessions of NE IPA brewers
« Reply #21 on: May 28, 2016, 08:30:43 pm »
Not when added to the boil. Although, IIRC, it really didn't do too much for the "haze" thing either. The haze in witibiers really come mostly from the yeast hanging around in suspension.
Actually the haze in German Wheat beers is from yeast, the haze in Belgian Witbiers is from starch.

As in unconverted starches from the mash?  I don't see how that is possible unless they use straight unmalted wheat berries without any conversion (ie turbid mash, which I don't think witbier producers do, although I could be wrong).

The standard recipe is 50/50 pale malt and raw wheat.  I'm not sure what kind of mash is used, but wiith that much adjunct you're not going to get full conversion.

Offline chinaski

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Re: Confessions of NE IPA brewers
« Reply #22 on: May 29, 2016, 10:11:08 am »
It is unclear to me from the link whether the flour and fruit puree is used in the tired hands IPA or some other beers in their line.

As a northeasterner myself with easy access to the originators of the "style", I really doubt that the haziness is necessarily the intent in say, Heady Topper.  I think the intent is to not allow fining or other clarification methods to diminish the hop flavor and aroma of the beer.  By design the intent is to keep as much hop in the flavor and aroma as possible and it is likely that some of that flavor is stuck on the yeast in suspension.  The side effects of this intent is a haziness and softer, fuller mouthfeel than a clear IPA.


narvin

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Re: Confessions of NE IPA brewers
« Reply #23 on: May 29, 2016, 10:31:57 am »
It is unclear to me from the link whether the flour and fruit puree is used in the tired hands IPA or some other beers in their line.

As a northeasterner myself with easy access to the originators of the "style", I really doubt that the haziness is necessarily the intent in say, Heady Topper.  I think the intent is to not allow fining or other clarification methods to diminish the hop flavor and aroma of the beer.  By design the intent is to keep as much hop in the flavor and aroma as possible and it is likely that some of that flavor is stuck on the yeast in suspension.  The side effects of this intent is a haziness and softer, fuller mouthfeel than a clear IPA.

Unfortunately, what I get (at least in experiences with heady that makes its way down here through friends) is poor shelf stability.  It must be nice to tell consumers that they need to come to your brewery to get the beer the day it's released or else it won't taste like it's supposed to and have them lap it up.  It's a feature, not a bug!

Offline jeffy

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Re: Confessions of NE IPA brewers
« Reply #24 on: May 29, 2016, 10:58:30 am »
The Heady Topper Brewers were in Tampa for Hunahpus Day this year and I enjoyed their beer, but in truth, I drank it out of the can.  I know.  I was bad, but the beer was pretty good.  If I had seen it I may not have enjoyed it as much. 
I have gotten very close to sending back beers that were murky before I knew it was a "thing".  It is definitely not my thing.
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Offline ram5ey

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Re: Confessions of NE IPA brewers
« Reply #25 on: May 29, 2016, 04:45:31 pm »
The Heady Topper Brewers were in Tampa for Hunahpus Day this year and I enjoyed their beer, but in truth, I drank it out of the can.  I know.  I was bad, but the beer was pretty good.  If I had seen it I may not have enjoyed it as much. 
I have gotten very close to sending back beers that were murky before I knew it was a "thing".  It is definitely not my thing.

I buddy sent me some Heady a couple years ago before I had ever heard of the NE IPA thing.  I didn't pay attention to the can and gently poured 7/8 of it into a glass.  It was only moderately hazy and certainly not murky or opaque the way others are now.  I found it enjoyable and almost grapefruit "juicy", but I would have been disturbed if it was murky or opaque...I drink with my eyes.
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Offline dilluh98

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Re: Confessions of NE IPA brewers
« Reply #26 on: August 04, 2016, 09:10:09 am »
Not sure what all the fuss is about. I recently brewed this "New England Pale Ale":

OG: 1.051, FG: 1.009
75% MO
25% Flaked Oats
60 IBUs of Magnum @ 60 min
1 oz each of Centennial, Citra and Simcoe @ 0 min
2 oz each of Centennial, Citra and Simcoe for 20 min whirlpool @ 150F
WY1318 (Boddington's) open fermented @ 68F for 2 weeks.
100ppm each of Ca, SO4 and Cl.

Bottled it, let it carb for a few weeks @ RT, 2 days in the fridge and it pours damn near commercial clear out of the bottle. Nowhere near hazy let alone turbid. Absolutely delicious beer - maybe one of the best APA/AIPAs I've ever made but I'm not getting the look nor the "juicy" mouthfeel everyone talks about with these beers. I'm confused but love the results nonetheless.  :P

Offline brewinhard

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Re: Confessions of NE IPA brewers
« Reply #27 on: August 04, 2016, 09:41:50 am »
Not sure what all the fuss is about. I recently brewed this "New England Pale Ale":

OG: 1.051, FG: 1.009
75% MO
25% Flaked Oats
60 IBUs of Magnum @ 60 min
1 oz each of Centennial, Citra and Simcoe @ 0 min
2 oz each of Centennial, Citra and Simcoe for 20 min whirlpool @ 150F
WY1318 (Boddington's) open fermented @ 68F for 2 weeks.
100ppm each of Ca, SO4 and Cl.

Bottled it, let it carb for a few weeks @ RT, 2 days in the fridge and it pours damn near commercial clear out of the bottle. Nowhere near hazy let alone turbid. Absolutely delicious beer - maybe one of the best APA/AIPAs I've ever made but I'm not getting the look nor the "juicy" mouthfeel everyone talks about with these beers. I'm confused but love the results nonetheless.  :P

You forgot the special "incantation" which helps to set the proper haze in this style.  ;)

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Confessions of NE IPA brewers
« Reply #28 on: August 04, 2016, 09:46:42 am »
You forgot the special "incantation" which helps to set the proper haze in this style.  ;)


Yeah, I think at the end of the incantation you sprinkle wheat flour into the kettle.  :)
Jon H.

Offline dilluh98

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Re: Confessions of NE IPA brewers
« Reply #29 on: August 04, 2016, 09:49:41 am »
You forgot the special "incantation" which helps to set the proper haze in this style.  ;)


Yeah, I think at the end of the incantation you sprinkle wheat flour into the kettle.  :)

I didn't have those pro brewing notes in front of me.  ;)