Author Topic: How to add coffee to a stout  (Read 5416 times)

Offline Mike-Ale

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How to add coffee to a stout
« on: June 04, 2016, 02:56:35 AM »
Looking to make a big coffee imperial stout (around 10%). Ideas on the best way to add the coffee and what type?   I am a little gun shy. My first ever brew was a coffee stout that got infected and I had to dump. Time to face my fears... 3 years later.

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: How to add coffee to a stout
« Reply #1 on: June 04, 2016, 03:10:42 AM »
Lots of methods used here. I like to add coarsely cracked beans to a fine mesh nylon bag, and add the bag to the beer after FG is reached. IME 4-8 oz of beans is plenty. Sample the beer each day until it tastes like you want, pull the bag and package the beer. Normally a couple days or so gives me what I'm after. Good luck!


Edit - As for type, go with personal preference. Fresh, great smelling beans will work well. Personally, I like Sumatra beans a lot for coffee beers (great fragrance), and have liked espresso beans as well.
« Last Edit: June 04, 2016, 03:13:47 AM by HoosierBrew »
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Offline kramerog

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Re: How to add coffee to a stout
« Reply #2 on: June 04, 2016, 02:45:27 PM »
I find that the coffee flavor fades and when it does it tastes off so I like to add the coffee beans to the keg and leave it in there until the keg kicks.  On the other hand, I would not keg a RIS.  I think Hoosier's recommendations are good; you get a beer that has coffee flavor rather than carbonated coffee.

Offline jeffy

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Re: How to add coffee to a stout
« Reply #3 on: June 04, 2016, 03:44:12 PM »
Hoosier's is the method I use, but the last one I made had a green pepper flavor/aroma to some people.  Drew suggests using a darker roast to prevent this in cold steeped beer.
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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: How to add coffee to a stout
« Reply #4 on: June 04, 2016, 09:57:22 PM »
the last one I made had a green pepper flavor/aroma to some people.  Drew suggests using a darker roast to prevent this in cold steeped beer.


I've read this posted a couple times lately. I've never had this issue - yet. My go to is usually Sumatra because I love the earthy, cedary aroma and flavor. The other two beans I really like in beer are Espresso and French roasts, being obviously deeply roasted. What coffee did you have this issue with, out of curiosity? It seems like a really lightly roasted coffee like Kona or Blue Mountain would be pretty susceptible to this issue.
Jon H.

Offline jeffy

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Re: How to add coffee to a stout
« Reply #5 on: June 04, 2016, 10:10:52 PM »
the last one I made had a green pepper flavor/aroma to some people.  Drew suggests using a darker roast to prevent this in cold steeped beer.


I've read this posted a couple times lately. I've never had this issue - yet. My go to is usually Sumatra because I love the earthy, cedary aroma and flavor. The other two beans I really like in beer are Espresso and French roasts, being obviously deeply roasted. What coffee did you have this issue with, out of curiosity? It seems like a really lightly roasted coffee like Kona or Blue Mountain would be pretty susceptible to this issue.
It really wasn't so light.  I buy from a local roaster, usually by country of origin rather than roast color.  This was Brazilian.
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AHA member since 1991, now a lifetime member
BJCP judge since 1995

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: How to add coffee to a stout
« Reply #6 on: June 04, 2016, 10:19:07 PM »
the last one I made had a green pepper flavor/aroma to some people.  Drew suggests using a darker roast to prevent this in cold steeped beer.


I've read this posted a couple times lately. I've never had this issue - yet. My go to is usually Sumatra because I love the earthy, cedary aroma and flavor. The other two beans I really like in beer are Espresso and French roasts, being obviously deeply roasted. What coffee did you have this issue with, out of curiosity? It seems like a really lightly roasted coffee like Kona or Blue Mountain would be pretty susceptible to this issue.
It really wasn't so light.  I buy from a local roaster, usually by country of origin rather than roast color.  This was Brazilian.


Cool. Thanks.!
Jon H.

Offline brewinhard

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Re: How to add coffee to a stout
« Reply #7 on: June 04, 2016, 10:40:33 PM »
the last one I made had a green pepper flavor/aroma to some people.  Drew suggests using a darker roast to prevent this in cold steeped beer.


I've read this posted a couple times lately. I've never had this issue - yet. My go to is usually Sumatra because I love the earthy, cedary aroma and flavor. The other two beans I really like in beer are Espresso and French roasts, being obviously deeply roasted. What coffee did you have this issue with, out of curiosity? It seems like a really lightly roasted coffee like Kona or Blue Mountain would be pretty susceptible to this issue.
This was Brazilian.

Just like my waxes....

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: How to add coffee to a stout
« Reply #8 on: June 04, 2016, 10:53:09 PM »
Just like my waxes....

Ha! Got that image tattooed in my brain.  :(
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Offline brewinhard

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Re: How to add coffee to a stout
« Reply #9 on: June 04, 2016, 10:54:50 PM »
Just like my waxes....

Ha! Got that image tattooed in my brain.  :(

Now I feel really sorry for you.

Offline smblues

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Re: How to add coffee to a stout
« Reply #10 on: June 06, 2016, 05:25:07 PM »
I have had great success adding the coffee to kettle at flame out and letting steep for 20 minutes before cooling. I coarse grind 4oz of a low acid variety of coffee and put it in a hop bag.
I'd dry hop that.

Offline Joe Sr.

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Re: How to add coffee to a stout
« Reply #11 on: June 06, 2016, 06:59:36 PM »
the last one I made had a green pepper flavor/aroma to some people.  Drew suggests using a darker roast to prevent this in cold steeped beer.


I've read this posted a couple times lately. I've never had this issue - yet. My go to is usually Sumatra because I love the earthy, cedary aroma and flavor. The other two beans I really like in beer are Espresso and French roasts, being obviously deeply roasted. What coffee did you have this issue with, out of curiosity? It seems like a really lightly roasted coffee like Kona or Blue Mountain would be pretty susceptible to this issue.
It really wasn't so light.  I buy from a local roaster, usually by country of origin rather than roast color.  This was Brazilian.

I got the same thing from New Guinea coffee, which my local roaster was not surprised by.  I gave him a bottle on Saturday, so I'll have to bug him for tasting notes.

I do coarse cracked beans added to the beer for 24 -48 hours.  Volume of beans is kinda up to you.  I think I went with 3 oz. for 5 gallons last time.
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Offline rblack90

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Re: How to add coffee to a stout
« Reply #12 on: June 06, 2016, 07:14:33 PM »
I make a cold coffee toddy. I buy from a local roaster a dark roasted bean. I use 1/4 pound to 3 quarts water. Course grind. let steep overnight at 40 degrees. Strain into keg and rack beer into that.

Offline Rhoobarb

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Re: How to add coffee to a stout
« Reply #13 on: June 06, 2016, 07:22:58 PM »
This /\/\/\/\
I have done it three different ways and my hands-down personal favorite was cold-steeped overnight. Add the liquid at kegging. As others have stated, a dark roast is best. I do ~6 oz. for a five gal. batch.
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Offline brewinhard

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Re: How to add coffee to a stout
« Reply #14 on: June 07, 2016, 12:19:11 AM »
This /\/\/\/\
I have done it three different ways and my hands-down personal favorite was cold-steeped overnight. Add the liquid at kegging. As others have stated, a dark roast is best. I do ~6 oz. for a five gal. batch.

No issues with regards to dropping the pH too low on an already dark beer?