Author Topic: How quick to cold-crash?  (Read 923 times)

Offline panfriedcharlie

  • 1st Kit
  • *
  • Posts: 5
  • The cause of -- and solution to -- life's problems
    • View Profile
How quick to cold-crash?
« on: June 28, 2016, 05:22:55 PM »
I get impatient even when lager-ing. A lot of writing recommends stepping down the temperature gradually, say two degrees or so every twelve hours. I go more like five.

The point, as I understand it, is to not shock the yeast to death.

Do the same rules apply for cold-crashing before packaging? I'm going to bottle an APA on Sunday. In the past (given the word "crash") I just set the controller to 34F and walk away. I'm wondering: is there a better way to do it?

Seems like the idea of not shocking the yeast would apply here too, though I guess yeast health is more important in lager-ing than in bottling.

Offline denny

  • Administrator
  • Retired with too much time on my hands
  • *****
  • Posts: 19462
  • Noti OR [1991.4, 287.6deg] AR
    • View Profile
    • Dennybrew
Re: How quick to cold-crash?
« Reply #1 on: June 28, 2016, 05:47:41 PM »
I get impatient even when lager-ing. A lot of writing recommends stepping down the temperature gradually, say two degrees or so every twelve hours. I go more like five.

The point, as I understand it, is to not shock the yeast to death.

Do the same rules apply for cold-crashing before packaging? I'm going to bottle an APA on Sunday. In the past (given the word "crash") I just set the controller to 34F and walk away. I'm wondering: is there a better way to do it?

Seems like the idea of not shocking the yeast would apply here too, though I guess yeast health is more important in lager-ing than in bottling.

I cold crash both ales and lagers.  I just wait til after fermentation is finished so there's no danger of "yeast shock".  I do exactly what you say you've done....set the fermentation chamber to 33F, put the fermenter in, and leave it.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell

Offline panfriedcharlie

  • 1st Kit
  • *
  • Posts: 5
  • The cause of -- and solution to -- life's problems
    • View Profile
Re: How quick to cold-crash?
« Reply #2 on: June 28, 2016, 06:46:40 PM »
Thanks for the advice!

Offline brewinhard

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 3225
    • View Profile
Re: How quick to cold-crash?
« Reply #3 on: June 28, 2016, 08:22:46 PM »
I get impatient even when lager-ing. A lot of writing recommends stepping down the temperature gradually, say two degrees or so every twelve hours. I go more like five.

The point, as I understand it, is to not shock the yeast to death.

Do the same rules apply for cold-crashing before packaging? I'm going to bottle an APA on Sunday. In the past (given the word "crash") I just set the controller to 34F and walk away. I'm wondering: is there a better way to do it?

Seems like the idea of not shocking the yeast would apply here too, though I guess yeast health is more important in lager-ing than in bottling.

I cold crash both ales and lagers.  I just wait til after fermentation is finished so there's no danger of "yeast shock".  I do exactly what you say you've done....set the fermentation chamber to 33F, put the fermenter in, and leave it.

Exactly what I do too. No bother with dropping temps slowly. Same for both ales and lagers providing no diacetyl or other fermentation off-products are noticeable.

Offline mabrungard

  • Brewmaster General
  • *******
  • Posts: 2388
  • Water matters!
    • View Profile
    • Bru'n Water
Re: How quick to cold-crash?
« Reply #4 on: June 28, 2016, 08:37:38 PM »
I've heard that rapid chilling can stress the yeast and cause them to exude flavor compounds that may be undesirable in the beer. I'm not convinced that these compounds are produced or are tasted, but it is a curious phenomena.

I suggest that someone perform an exbeeriment to see if there is a perceivable difference.
Martin B
Carmel, IN

BJCP National
Foam Blowers of Indiana (FBI)

Brewing Water Information at:
https://sites.google.com/site/brunwater/

Like Bru'n Water on Facebook
https://www.facebook.com/Brun-Water-464551136933908/?ref=bookmarks

Offline HoosierBrew

  • Global Moderator
  • I must live here
  • *****
  • Posts: 13030
  • Indianapolis,IN
    • View Profile
Re: How quick to cold-crash?
« Reply #5 on: June 28, 2016, 09:38:54 PM »
I cold crash both ales and lagers.  I just wait til after fermentation is finished so there's no danger of "yeast shock".  I do exactly what you say you've done....set the fermentation chamber to 33F, put the fermenter in, and leave it.

Exactly what I do too. No bother with dropping temps slowly. Same for both ales and lagers providing no diacetyl or other fermentation off-products are noticeable.


Same here. I think the people who report off flavors/aromas from crashing may be pushing the envelope timewise with their crashing. I don't crash ales until I'm at least a couple days past verified FG, lagers also get an extended d-rest before crashing. So by the time I crash, the yeast have basically done their job, cleaned up their mess,  and hit the time clock. No off flavors/aromas for me.


Edit - I don't doubt that there could be some strains more prone to causing issues when quick crashed. Just none of the ones I've used were.
« Last Edit: June 28, 2016, 10:14:32 PM by HoosierBrew »
Jon H.

Offline panfriedcharlie

  • 1st Kit
  • *
  • Posts: 5
  • The cause of -- and solution to -- life's problems
    • View Profile
Re: How quick to cold-crash?
« Reply #6 on: June 28, 2016, 11:52:53 PM »
Great info all! If this APA weren't so in-demand, (my coworkers are really champing at the bit for this batch) I would split it up and experiment. Next batch perhaps.

Thank you!

Offline santoch

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 887
  • North Bend, WA
    • View Profile
    • WAHA
Re: How quick to cold-crash?
« Reply #7 on: June 29, 2016, 02:39:27 AM »
The way to prevent/eliminate impatience is to brew so many batches in quick succession that you actually get sick and tired of having another fermenter to clean, another hose to clean, another keg to clean.  It may take a lot, but once you get there, you'll be able to wait out a batch without blinking an eye.
Mt. Si Brewing Society
Washington Homebrewer's Association (WAHA)
BJCP GM2/Mead Judge

Offline klickitat jim

  • I must live here
  • **********
  • Posts: 8474
    • View Profile
Re: How quick to cold-crash?
« Reply #8 on: June 29, 2016, 02:50:23 AM »
According to a blip knowledge drop by Zainasheff you have to drop faster than 2F per hour to experience a problem. Good luck doing that with more than a couple gallons. I crash by setting my controller to 30F and walking away. Never a problem

Offline ynotbrusum

  • I spend way too much time on the AHA forum
  • ********
  • Posts: 2804
  • Da mihi sis cerevisiam.
    • View Profile
Re: How quick to cold-crash?
« Reply #9 on: June 29, 2016, 06:16:23 PM »
The way to prevent/eliminate impatience is to brew so many batches in quick succession that you actually get sick and tired of having another fermenter to clean, another hose to clean, another keg to clean.  It may take a lot, but once you get there, you'll be able to wait out a batch without blinking an eye.


Agreed.  Until you get to the point where you start waiting on kegs to blow, so you can open up a fermenter for another brew session....then the dilemma becomes how many kegs can you justify having?  I'm at 17 and SWAMBO says that's enough!
Hodge Garage Brewing: "Brew with a glad heart!"