Author Topic: Split batch using two different yeasts-beer color question  (Read 824 times)

Offline Beachside

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Split batch using two different yeasts-beer color question
« on: July 03, 2016, 12:36:17 AM »
I used 1272 on half and PNW Ale yeast in the other. The 1272 batch is noticeably darker, so my question is, does yeast affect beer color? Or did I pick up more troob and that caused it?
Thanking you in advance,
Eric

Online blair.streit

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Re: Split batch using two different yeasts-beer color question
« Reply #1 on: July 03, 2016, 01:56:36 AM »
How did you transfer the beer to the fermentors? Which was first and which was second? Did you chill and settle in the kettle first?

I don't have any data about yeast impacting color, but it seems unlikely to have any significant impact. I'd be much more inclined to look at things that would impact wort composition. Wort tends to stratify pretty quickly, so with any settling period I would imagine you could see darker (and likely higher gravity) wort settling to the bottom. As you mentioned, trub in suspension could also have an impact, but that should settle out.

Offline denny

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Re: Split batch using two different yeasts-beer color question
« Reply #2 on: July 03, 2016, 03:57:30 PM »
Is the beer done fermenting?  One yeast could be less flocculant than the other and that will affect color.
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Offline brewinhard

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Re: Split batch using two different yeasts-beer color question
« Reply #3 on: July 03, 2016, 06:57:50 PM »
Is the beer done fermenting?  One yeast could be less flocculant than the other and that will affect color.

This is exactly what I thought when I first read the post. A less flocculant yeast will remain in supension longer in greater numbers causing the beer to appear "lighter" in color vs another beer that the yeast have dropped out of suspension lending the real, darker color of the beer to show.

Online blair.streit

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Re: Split batch using two different yeasts-beer color question
« Reply #4 on: July 03, 2016, 07:32:35 PM »
Is the beer done fermenting?  One yeast could be less flocculant than the other and that will affect color.
Doh. Yeah, what he said.

Offline Beachside

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Re: Split batch using two different yeasts-beer color question
« Reply #5 on: July 06, 2016, 01:35:46 AM »
Thank you for the replies!
I think I may have been due to using two different sized glass carboys. I have a quick connect on my boil pot with a splitter and hoses so I can fill both fermeters. The 5 gallon filled up (Well before the troob), minus head space and the 6.5 took more wort along with some troob.
Yes, it was done fermenting, I actually left it on the yeast for and extra week because I was out of town.
« Last Edit: July 06, 2016, 01:37:59 AM by Beachside »

Offline Stevie

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Re: Split batch using two different yeasts-beer color question
« Reply #6 on: July 06, 2016, 01:44:15 AM »
So you never compared two similarly sized samples in two similar glasses? If not, that's your issue.

Offline Beachside

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Re: Split batch using two different yeasts-beer color question
« Reply #7 on: July 06, 2016, 03:07:23 AM »
The beer has been bottled and conditioned, and yes I poured them side by side to see the color difference.