Author Topic: Apple ESB  (Read 1360 times)

Offline ryhaynes

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Apple ESB
« on: July 01, 2010, 07:19:48 PM »
I've brewed a recent ESB, and from what people have said it's turned out to be a decent middle of the road beer.  A friend suggested that I add apple to the beer, and it got me thinking. 

I'd like to try using Gala apples in secondary, but I'm not quite sure how many apples/apples by weight I should add.  Overall, I think I'd like the apple flavor to be kind of an afterthought, something subtle that people pick up on.  Suggestions?

Offline euge

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Re: Apple ESB
« Reply #1 on: July 01, 2010, 07:44:46 PM »
Anything just about can be used as a fermentable. Just love apples. However, they might make your ESB taste a little "cidery" which is generally considered undesireable.

To me- fermented apples lose their flavor for the most part. But, you can add them into a secondary fermenter if you want to try it.

Good luck!
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline ryhaynes

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Re: Apple ESB
« Reply #2 on: July 01, 2010, 07:51:45 PM »
Euge, thanks for the feedback!  I'm not necessarily looking to create something I'll submit for judging, just looking for a way to mix up my ESB recipe.  Any suggestions as to how much apple (either by weight or number of apples, I'm not sure) you think I should try in secondary?

Offline jaicmac

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Re: Apple ESB
« Reply #3 on: July 01, 2010, 07:56:00 PM »
You might try toasted apple wood chips in a secondary. Barbequers often used these. I have used toasted peach chips in a blonde for a subtle peach/fruity flavor. Apple might work as well.

Offline ryhaynes

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Re: Apple ESB
« Reply #4 on: July 01, 2010, 07:57:48 PM »
Good stuff!  Where would I find the wood chips?

Offline jaicmac

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Re: Apple ESB
« Reply #5 on: July 01, 2010, 08:04:05 PM »
An orchard by me sells both peach and apple chips. I've seen apple chips at a "Whole Foods" type store in town.
Screen out the bark and toast at 300 for 15 min then stir and do another 15 min.

Offline ryhaynes

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Re: Apple ESB
« Reply #6 on: July 01, 2010, 08:14:23 PM »
A few hours on the forum and I'm already bouncing off the wall with ideas!

What are the benefits to using apple wood chips in the beer, as opposed to apple slices?

Offline euge

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Re: Apple ESB
« Reply #7 on: July 01, 2010, 10:32:34 PM »
You're welcome! Someones' sure to have tried this before LOL :D Never having done it myself the number three jumps out at me. Could it be 3 pounds of apple or only three apples themselves, though Gala aren't that big are they?

I'd slice it fairly thin to to have maximum surface area but not so thin it disintegrates.
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline euge

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Re: Apple ESB
« Reply #8 on: July 01, 2010, 10:45:39 PM »
Oh-ho! A dopple-thread! ;)

Initially I was for slicing apples but maybe the dried apple chips will hold up better and impart in the finished product more of an apple hint.

Easy enough at home in a dehydrator if you have one... which of course, I do. The dried apple flavor is much more intense. It will be interesting to see if the ESB is cidery.
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline majorvices

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Re: Apple ESB
« Reply #9 on: July 02, 2010, 05:09:22 AM »
Not sure how much flavor you will get from the apples unless you juice them. I have used fresh, local apple cider in leu of sparge water before with nice results.

I have also smoked grain over apple wood, and even smoked apples and have added them to the mash.
Keith Y.
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Offline babalu87

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Re: Apple ESB
« Reply #10 on: July 02, 2010, 06:13:38 AM »
Keith, how much real apple aroma/flavor did you get post fermentation?

I was thinking about brewing a malty beer (a 90 perhaps) and then adding some apple juice once fermentation starts slowing down.

Idea being not to boil the apple juice.

Jeff

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Offline bluesman

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Re: Apple ESB
« Reply #11 on: July 02, 2010, 06:27:48 AM »
Keith, how much real apple aroma/flavor did you get post fermentation?

I was thinking about brewing a malty beer (a 90 perhaps) and then adding some apple juice once fermentation starts slowing down.

Idea being not to boil the apple juice.



+1

If you want a hint of apple in your ESB then you can back sweeten with fresh pasteurized juice to your own taste after fermentation in the keg just prior to carbonating.
Ron Price

Offline majorvices

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Re: Apple ESB
« Reply #12 on: July 03, 2010, 06:18:56 AM »
The recipe was kinda like a smoked alt with apples. Since I used smoked malt (and I smoked ALL the malt over apple wood) ... well ... lets just say it wasn't a subtle beer.  ::) ;D It had some very pleasant tartness though from the apples. I'm not sure how much flavor or aroma was there under the smoke. I realize that boiling could theoretically remove some of the apple aroma and set a pectin haze (thought it did not do the latter) but I figured, what the hell.

Regardless, I doubt just adding sliced apples to the secondary will do much unless you crush or juice them somehow. Another option I have considered is making a strong, BW strength ale and then diluting it down to a reasonable strength with apple cider.
Keith Y.
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Offline enso

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Re: Apple ESB
« Reply #13 on: July 11, 2010, 04:06:06 PM »
Most culinary (regular eating apples) will probably not provide much of any character except some tartness depending on the acidity of the apple.

If you can get your hands on some traditional cider apples they will give it some more flavor.  Kingston Black would be an excellent one to try.  It is a pretty well balanced apple with good amounts of tannins, acidity and flavor.  When eaten by itself it has a distinctive flavor which reminds me a bit of caraway seeds.  Other cider apples would be Somerset redstreak, Stoke red, Chisel Jersey, Dabbinet, Medaille d'­Or, Tremlett's bitter...  It will likely be more difficult to find these.  Not many growers grow theses types anymore as they are really best suited to cider production (hard) and there are VERY few commercial cideries in this country producing real cider.
Dave Brush

Offline skyler

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Re: Apple ESB
« Reply #14 on: July 12, 2010, 08:53:11 PM »
just toss an ipod in with the whirlfloc at 15 min.  ;)