Author Topic: New to brewing  (Read 2521 times)

Offline Error404

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New to brewing
« on: July 15, 2016, 05:19:35 AM »
I am an absolute newb to homebrewing. I love beer and can appreciate the major differences between the many types of beers out there. I recently had an appiphany to brew my own! After about 1000 youtube videos I feel confident enough to give homebrewing a shot.

I've been looking at the starter kits on http://www.whatalesya.com/starterkits.html not sure if that's all I'd need for entry level brewing such as extract brewing.  I thought about replacing the fermenting bucket with a 6.5gal glass carboy and picking up their 20qt steel brew pot as well.

I want to get up to the point where I am brewing at least 2 kinds of beers at a time, and getting a dual-tap/dual keggerator.

Offline reverseapachemaster

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Re: New to brewing
« Reply #1 on: July 15, 2016, 02:52:49 PM »
It's a fine set of equipment. The glass isn't necessary and a lot of people are moving away from it due to safety concerns. That said, you could opt for glass over the bucket. I've used that same bucket for the past seven years. If you plan on going directly into kegging you should probably buy your equipment piecemeal because you won't need the capper or bottling bucket, which is almost half of the cost of the kit.
Heck yeah I blog about homebrewing: Brain Sparging on Brewing

Offline blair.streit

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Re: New to brewing
« Reply #2 on: July 15, 2016, 04:02:25 PM »
The glass isn't necessary and a lot of people are moving away from it due to safety concerns.

+1. If you want to see the fermentation in progress (which I think is a good thing especially in the early days), I recommend PET (plastic) carboys. Lots of people use these with great success, and they're cheaper than glass.

If you plan on going directly into kegging you should probably buy your equipment piecemeal because you won't need the capper or bottling bucket, which is almost half of the cost of the kit.

+1. I started out kegging as well, and felt like I was able to maintain motivation to do more batches because I didn't dread the bottling process.

I looked online at kits from several of the popular online shops (MoreBeer, Midwest Supplies, Northern Brewer), but most of them either include bottling supplies (which you probably won't want) and some other odds and ends that are not what I would recommend (i.e. I do not recommend the "one step" cleaner/sanitizer that's included in some of the kits).

Maybe someone can point to an existing sticky or thread that lists out "the essentials"? Some of the stores I mentioned do have separate "kegging kits" that should have everything you need to get started kegging. Just do some reading on pin lock versus ball lock and make a decision on that so that you can standardize. I started out with pin lock (because it came with my starter kit), but later ended up switching to ball lock so that I could purchase brand new kegs (all pin locks are refurbished).

Offline curtdogg

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Re: New to brewing
« Reply #3 on: October 24, 2016, 11:33:41 PM »
so many styles, so many techniques, so many different ways to brew.

Here's my two cents.

I started doing small extract batches. DME is very easy to use. Then I eventually did partial mashes.
I used dry yeast, it's inexpensive and works great.
I started with basic styles like; Belgian, Brown and Blond ales.
I live in California and I didn't start with fermentation temp, control. I just used the wet towel method. to control fermentation temp.
 I saved some bottles as I did my research (Belgian bottles work best) cleaned and sanitized them bought some champagne plugs and cages (dirt cheap) and bottle conditioned with corn sugar.

When I did upgrade to larger batches I was still able to use the equipment I purchased for small batch brewing.
At this point I only brew once or twice a month because of my schedule.
I share with my friends and family. They definitely appreciate it.
Most of all I do it because I enjoy it. The end result whether good or not so good just makes me want to try again and make that one beer, mead or even cider that is better than anything I've ever tasted.

Cheers
R,
Curtis

I believe every person has at least one great beer in them
Sam Calagione.

Sweet home of the Beer Lords.