Author Topic: Campden tablet in boil  (Read 1099 times)

Offline juggabrew303

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Campden tablet in boil
« on: July 21, 2016, 02:08:10 AM »
Has anyone thrown their campden tablet into the wort boil.  I forgot to add mine before mashing and added to boil.  The beer has good aroma but flavor is dull and lacking character.  Wondering what others have experienced

It was the Columbus pale ale recipe


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Offline mabrungard

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Re: Campden tablet in boil
« Reply #1 on: July 21, 2016, 12:38:58 PM »
What was the Campden for?  If it was for chlorine compound removal, adding it in the boil was a waste of time. Those compounds have to be removed from water before the malt is added.
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Offline juggabrew303

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Re: Campden tablet in boil
« Reply #2 on: July 21, 2016, 02:46:02 PM »
Yes, to remove chloramine.  I always add before mash but slipped my mind this time.  Just wondering if it would affect flavor


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Offline brewinhard

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Re: Campden tablet in boil
« Reply #3 on: July 21, 2016, 08:28:39 PM »
Yes, to remove chloramine.  I always add before mash but slipped my mind this time.  Just wondering if it would affect flavor


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Extremely minute amounts of salts in one of those, so depending on your batch size I doubt it would have much impact on the flavor of the finished product. Maybe someone will chime in that has done that before.

Offline Lazy Ant Brewing

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Re: Campden tablet in boil
« Reply #4 on: July 21, 2016, 09:47:07 PM »
Yes, to remove chloramine.  I always add before mash but slipped my mind this time.  Just wondering if it would affect flavor


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I've taken the time to make a detailed check list based on my equipment and brewing conditions, and I find it very helpful in eliminating omissions.

Each task is presented in the proper sequence and the list includes; the style of beer, water volume,  amounts of chemicals need for water treatment, strike temp, instructions to check gravity at appropriate points, boil times, schedule for boil kettle fermentables and hops, sanitizing instructions for fermentor, cooling instructions and more.

In short, a road map for that particular wort.

If I brew a different style that requires changes in chemicals and methods, I'll take the time before brew day to change the instructions.

 I don't know if I'll ever brew world class beer because of it, but I haven't had to dump any batches and I like the results,

 Cheers!

It's easier to read brewing books and get information from the forum than to sacrifice virgins to appease the brewing gods when bad beer happens!

Offline toby

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Re: Campden tablet in boil
« Reply #5 on: July 22, 2016, 06:36:27 PM »
Campden wouldn't make a dull beer 'brighter'. It's to prevent chloramine from interacting with the malt to produce chlorophenols in the finished beer. 'Dull' could be a product of too high of a pH or stale malt. Do you have some phosphoric or lactic acid?  Add a drop or two to a glass of the finished beer and see if it changes the dullness.

Offline juggabrew303

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Re: Campden tablet in boil
« Reply #6 on: July 23, 2016, 02:42:27 AM »
Campden wouldn't make a dull beer 'brighter'. It's to prevent chloramine from interacting with the malt to produce chlorophenols in the finished beer. 'Dull' could be a product of too high of a pH or stale malt. Do you have some phosphoric or lactic acid?  Add a drop or two to a glass of the finished beer and see if it changes the dullness.
I use lactic acid, I'll give that a try.  As for grains, my brew shop has pretty heavy traffic (brew hut in Denver) so would be surprised if stale malt was the issue.  I don't have a PH meter yet but I use brunwater to target my PH.  Target was 5.3


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