Author Topic: Mash Temps  (Read 1668 times)

Offline Philbrew

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Re: Mash Temps
« Reply #15 on: August 23, 2016, 04:49:55 AM »

Sub 160 it's not as pronounced, but 160-162F for 45 mins and the foam has been thicker and more persistent than the single mashed lagers for me every time.

So is that sorta like doing a long, low mash out?
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Offline scrap iron

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Re: Mash Temps
« Reply #16 on: August 23, 2016, 01:54:02 PM »
  +1   on the 160-162* at the end of the mash for better foam. I run a direct fire RIMS system and at the end of my selected mash schedule I run it up to those temps for at least 20 mins. I've noticed a improvement in foam and foam stability. Higher mash temps I use for beer with more body[ 156* for Porters etc.] and lower for more fermentable [dry] beers[ 149* for Saisons etc.].  Using longer mash times for the lower temps[90 mins].  To the OP, hope this helps, and no the mash out temp is around 168*, so these temps for foam are lower.    Some use a mashout and others don't, I just collect the Wort after the 160-162* into the BK while adding heat to raise temp while collecting.     
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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Mash Temps
« Reply #17 on: August 23, 2016, 02:01:45 PM »
  no the mash out temp is around 168*, so these temps for foam are lower.   


Yep. The main purpose of a mash out is to denature the enzymes and 'lock in' the mash profile. So that would denature the alpha that contributes to the good foam.
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Offline deadpoetic0077

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Re: Mash Temps
« Reply #18 on: August 23, 2016, 02:07:47 PM »
  no the mash out temp is around 168*, so these temps for foam are lower.   


Yep. The main purpose of a mash out is to denature the enzymes and 'lock in' the mash profile. So that would denature the alpha that contributes to the good foam.

Hmm. I had not heard this before. I will have to try this next time. Most of my brews so far have not had very good head retention. Thanks!

Offline dmtaylor

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Re: Mash Temps
« Reply #19 on: August 23, 2016, 02:27:33 PM »
I haven't really noticed any trouble with foam although I have to say that my mashout never quite hits 168 F, but only goes to about the low 160s, so I've probably been enjoying the benefits all along completely by accident!

It never ceases to amaze me just how much malt mixed with warm water then allowed to ferment loves to turn itself into the most perfect beer even without a whole lot of help from expert brewmasters.  :)
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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Mash Temps
« Reply #20 on: August 23, 2016, 02:40:58 PM »
I haven't really noticed any trouble with foam although I have to say that my mashout never quite hits 168 F, but only goes to about the low 160s, so I've probably been enjoying the benefits all along completely by accident!

It never ceases to amaze me just how much malt mixed with warm water then allowed to ferment loves to turn itself into the most perfect beer even without a whole lot of help from expert brewmasters.  :)


Yeah, no kidding. Malt wants to become beer !
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Offline Visor

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Re: Mash Temps
« Reply #21 on: August 23, 2016, 03:11:21 PM »
  My question is how anyone knows for certain exactly what their mash temperature is, and that said mash  temperature is entirely consistent throughout the mash. Granted my experience is limited to about a dozen brews since I finally was able to get back into this a few months ago, but every mash I've done I can get substantially different temps in different parts of the tun, or with different thermometers. The variability in different areas of the tun was much greater when I was still mashing in the BK, especially during re-heat, but it exists in the cooler also. And I'm not talking one or two degrees, even in the cooler tun there can be as much as 10 or 15 degrees difference in areas only a few inches apart, although usually it's closer to 5 or so degrees. And yes, those differences exist after substantial stirring of the mash [which I'm aware increases the risk of oxidation from HSA].
  Unless the rest of the homebrewing world knows some secrets about temp control that I haven't yet stumbled across, I suspect there is a healthy dose of guestimating and assuming when it comes to mash temps. I would love to be able to control mash temps to 1 or 2 degrees, but have no realistic expectation of that happening any time soon.
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Offline dmtaylor

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Re: Mash Temps
« Reply #22 on: August 23, 2016, 03:27:12 PM »
  My question is how anyone knows for certain exactly what their mash temperature is, and that said mash  temperature is entirely consistent throughout the mash. Granted my experience is limited to about a dozen brews since I finally was able to get back into this a few months ago, but every mash I've done I can get substantially different temps in different parts of the tun, or with different thermometers. The variability in different areas of the tun was much greater when I was still mashing in the BK, especially during re-heat, but it exists in the cooler also. And I'm not talking one or two degrees, even in the cooler tun there can be as much as 10 or 15 degrees difference in areas only a few inches apart, although usually it's closer to 5 or so degrees. And yes, those differences exist after substantial stirring of the mash [which I'm aware increases the risk of oxidation from HSA].
  Unless the rest of the homebrewing world knows some secrets about temp control that I haven't yet stumbled across, I suspect there is a healthy dose of guestimating and assuming when it comes to mash temps. I would love to be able to control mash temps to 1 or 2 degrees, but have no realistic expectation of that happening any time soon.

Again I question how much any of this even matters.  Why do we concern ourselves with things that probably do not matter much if at all?  But of course we do.  No mash tun is perfect.  We could try, but I really don't think it matters when it comes to final beer flavor, which is all that DOES matter.
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Offline denny

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Re: Mash Temps
« Reply #23 on: August 23, 2016, 04:10:46 PM »
  no the mash out temp is around 168*, so these temps for foam are lower.   


Yep. The main purpose of a mash out is to denature the enzymes and 'lock in' the mash profile. So that would denature the alpha that contributes to the good foam.

Hmm. I had not heard this before. I will have to try this next time. Most of my brews so far have not had very good head retention. Thanks!

If you batch sparge, you get to a boils as soon or sooner than you have if you held mash temps for 20+ min. to do a mashout.  A mashout is just not necessary in batch sparging.
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Offline narcout

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Re: Mash Temps
« Reply #24 on: August 23, 2016, 04:25:33 PM »
And I'm not talking one or two degrees, even in the cooler tun there can be as much as 10 or 15 degrees difference in areas only a few inches apart, although usually it's closer to 5 or so degrees.

You should be able to get that down to 1 degree or less with enough gentle stirring.
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Offline deadpoetic0077

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Re: Mash Temps
« Reply #25 on: August 23, 2016, 04:28:54 PM »
  no the mash out temp is around 168*, so these temps for foam are lower.   


Yep. The main purpose of a mash out is to denature the enzymes and 'lock in' the mash profile. So that would denature the alpha that contributes to the good foam.

Hmm. I had not heard this before. I will have to try this next time. Most of my brews so far have not had very good head retention. Thanks!

If you batch sparge, you get to a boils as soon or sooner than you have if you held mash temps for 20+ min. to do a mashout.  A mashout is just not necessary in batch sparging.
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But, I am kinda of the mind of dmtaylor. It doesn't matter all THAT much so long as you enjoy what you brew. I'm a very technical person so I enjoy the intricacies of brewing and trying to make the best that I can make. But if it's good in the end, I'm happy. I'll consider what I can do better next time, but by the second or third beer, I don't really care anymore about trying to figure out what I could do better. I just enjoy the beer :)

I'll get better as I go, but so far, I haven't made a batch I didn't love.

Well there was one. But I ignore that one. I steeped a chipotle pepper wayyyyyyyyyyyyy too long. Lol.


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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Mash Temps
« Reply #26 on: August 23, 2016, 04:33:19 PM »
FWIW as far as mash outs are concerned, I don't bother with trying to do one either. As Denny said, you can be up to a boil in the time it would take to do one, especially if you sparge hot. I use 185-190F sparge water which speeds up the process.
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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Mash Temps
« Reply #27 on: August 23, 2016, 04:34:22 PM »
You should be able to get that down to 1 degree or less with enough gentle stirring.

Yep. I don't have trouble getting a uniform mash temp. I wonder about Visor's thermometer.
Jon H.

Offline ynotbrusum

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Re: Mash Temps
« Reply #28 on: August 23, 2016, 04:35:01 PM »
For Deadpoetic 0077 - I would say that BIAB is full all grain brewing (plenty of guys here do BIAB and make fantastic beers that way).  I agree with you on the fun side of things - its gotta be fun or it shouldn't be done that way.  As to the peppers (and many other spices or seasonings) - a little (sometimes surprisingly little) goes a long way in beer.
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Offline deadpoetic0077

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Re: Mash Temps
« Reply #29 on: August 23, 2016, 04:38:42 PM »
For Deadpoetic 0077 - I would say that BIAB is full all grain brewing (plenty of guys here do BIAB and make fantastic beers that way).  I agree with you on the fun side of things - its gotta be fun or it shouldn't be done that way.  As to the peppers (and many other spices or seasonings) - a little (sometimes surprisingly little) goes a long way in beer.
Oh I'm not say g it's bad to do biab. Not in the least bit. I would just like to get to the point where I'm using a 3 kettle system. Kinda experience everything in the whole brew. I did my first biab for my most recent brew. Still fermenting now but the flavor from my samples for Gravity tests are AWESOME. I used brulosophys (m)Oktoberfest recipe. This is also the first time I really paid a lot of attention to fermentation temps so that could be part of it. Just glad to be getting better at this!


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