Author Topic: Fermentation  (Read 623 times)

Offline mustbrew

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Fermentation
« on: August 29, 2016, 06:53:21 PM »
 Made my first all grain batch.  The recipe said fermentation is two weeks. It has now been 17 days and the airlock still bubbles  probably like one small bottle every three or four minutes ?  Am I supposed to let it go  even though it's been over two weeks ?  I am concerned about spoilage or bacteria

Offline pete b

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Re: Fermentation
« Reply #1 on: August 29, 2016, 06:59:37 PM »
Made my first all grain batch.  The recipe said fermentation is two weeks. It has now been 17 days and the airlock still bubbles  probably like one small bottle every three or four minutes ?  Am I supposed to let it go  even though it's been over two weeks ?  I am concerned about spoilage or bacteria
It could still be fermenting or there could still just be co2 trapped in the headspace. You need to test the gravity with a hydrometer, wait a couple days and test again. If its the same fermentation is done.
When in doubt, leave it, good things continue to happen, like the yeast cleaning up unwanted by products of fermentation, after primary fermentation is done.
If this is a higher gravity beer you might plan on leaving it a few more days even if the final gravity has been reached.
Don't let the bastards cheer you up.

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Fermentation
« Reply #2 on: August 29, 2016, 07:02:24 PM »
It's most likely CO2 from fermentation coming out of suspension. As for the recipe, there's no set time limit - the yeast is done when it's done. Lots of factors ( yeast quantity, viability, temperature,etc.) decide this. You know the beer is done fermenting by getting 2 or 3 identical gravity readings a day or two apart each. As for infection, it's possible but CO2 coming out of solution is much more likely.


Edit - What style did you brew? As Pete said, a high OG beer does take longer to ferment. As for infection, sample the beer when you take a gravity reading, to look for off flavors and aromas. I bet it tastes good.
« Last Edit: August 29, 2016, 07:12:47 PM by HoosierBrew »
Jon H.

Offline mustbrew

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Re: Fermentation
« Reply #3 on: August 29, 2016, 07:22:12 PM »
It's most likely CO2 from fermentation coming out of suspension. As for the recipe, there's no set time limit - the yeast is done when it's done. Lots of factors ( yeast quantity, viability, temperature,etc.) decide this. You know the beer is done fermenting by getting 2 or 3 identical gravity readings a day or two apart each. As for infection, it's possible but CO2 coming out of solution is much more likely.


Edit - What style did you brew? As Pete said, a high OG beer does take longer to ferment. As for infection, sample the beer when you take a gravity reading, to look for off flavors and aromas. I bet it tastes good.

Its a belgian blonde ale. I started at 1.065 SG. Its at 1.030. Thats 5% ABV. The recipe calls for a FG of 1.010. I checked it again twice over 2 days and its still at 1.030.. Oh and yes it tastes GREAT! Lol

Offline mustbrew

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Re: Fermentation
« Reply #4 on: August 29, 2016, 07:30:26 PM »
Made my first all grain batch.  The recipe said fermentation is two weeks. It has now been 17 days and the airlock still bubbles  probably like one small bottle every three or four minutes ?  Am I supposed to let it go  even though it's been over two weeks ?  I am concerned about spoilage or bacteria
It could still be fermenting or there could still just be co2 trapped in the headspace. You need to test the gravity with a hydrometer, wait a couple days and test again. If its the same fermentation is done.
When in doubt, leave it, good things continue to happen, like the yeast cleaning up unwanted by products of fermentation, after primary fermentation is done.
If this is a higher gravity beer you might plan on leaving it a few more days even if the final gravity has been reached.
Got it! Thanks!

Offline morticaixavier

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Re: Fermentation
« Reply #5 on: August 29, 2016, 07:45:57 PM »
It's most likely CO2 from fermentation coming out of suspension. As for the recipe, there's no set time limit - the yeast is done when it's done. Lots of factors ( yeast quantity, viability, temperature,etc.) decide this. You know the beer is done fermenting by getting 2 or 3 identical gravity readings a day or two apart each. As for infection, it's possible but CO2 coming out of solution is much more likely.


Edit - What style did you brew? As Pete said, a high OG beer does take longer to ferment. As for infection, sample the beer when you take a gravity reading, to look for off flavors and aromas. I bet it tastes good.

Its a belgian blonde ale. I started at 1.065 SG. Its at 1.030. Thats 5% ABV. The recipe calls for a FG of 1.010. I checked it again twice over 2 days and its still at 1.030.. Oh and yes it tastes GREAT! Lol

are you testing with a hydrometer? or a refractometer? if the refract, you have to adjust for the presence of Alcohol.
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Offline brewinhard

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Re: Fermentation
« Reply #6 on: August 29, 2016, 11:03:23 PM »
Yeah, 1.030 sounds pretty high for a final gravity for a belgian blonde. Do you notice any krausen still on top of the beer?

Offline mustbrew

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Re: Fermentation
« Reply #7 on: August 30, 2016, 03:26:40 AM »
It's most likely CO2 from fermentation coming out of suspension. As for the recipe, there's no set time limit - the yeast is done when it's done. Lots of factors ( yeast quantity, viability, temperature,etc.) decide this. You know the beer is done fermenting by getting 2 or 3 identical gravity readings a day or two apart each. As for infection, it's possible but CO2 coming out of solution is much more likely.


Edit - What style did you brew? As Pete said, a high OG beer does take longer to ferment. As for infection, sample the beer when you take a gravity reading, to look for off flavors and aromas. I bet it tastes good.

Its a belgian blonde ale. I started at 1.065 SG. Its at 1.030. Thats 5% ABV. The recipe calls for a FG of 1.010. I checked it again twice over 2 days and its still at 1.030.. Oh and yes it tastes GREAT! Lol

are you testing with a hydrometer? or a refractometer? if the refract, you have to adjust for the presence of Alcohol.
I have both. But i used a refract

Offline mustbrew

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Re: Fermentation
« Reply #8 on: August 30, 2016, 03:33:12 AM »
Yeah, 1.030 sounds pretty high for a final gravity for a belgian blonde. Do you notice any krausen still on top of the beer?
Yup i have krausen still floating on top

Offline Stevie

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Fermentation
« Reply #9 on: August 30, 2016, 03:53:05 AM »
You must use a calculator to measure the FG with a refractometer. Based on your quoted OGs, you are at about 1.011

Use this calculator in the future.
http://seanterrill.com/2012/01/06/refractometer-calculator/

Edit - I determined the brix by dividing by four. This isn't 100% accurate

Offline santoch

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Re: Fermentation
« Reply #10 on: August 30, 2016, 03:58:05 AM »
Your brewing software will take an OG reading and an FG reading and adjust it for the presence of alcohol, which makes the refractometer read differently from when there is only water present. The light bends differently in alcohol, and it throws off the reading.  The software compensates for that, but it needs to know the OG in order to do so.

All that said, if the gravity is indeed 1.030, then it is definitely stalled.  Is the krausen full and thick, with active bubbling, or is it just a few clumps on top?  If its full, then just leave it alone to continue fermenting.

If it looks like most has fallen and it's just a few little clumps on top, then you are still in luck in that Belgian yeasts are much more heat tolerant than other strains.  Rouse the yeast up and let the temp rise.  The Belgian strains (esp. the Saison strains) can tolerate heat into the high 70's or even the 80's with no ill-effects.

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Offline pete b

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Re: Fermentation
« Reply #11 on: August 30, 2016, 11:50:30 AM »

[/quote]
I have both. But i used a refract
[/quote]
I would just use your hydrometer now. If your refractometer reading is 1.030 uncorrected it sounds like you are closer to 1.010 and almost certainly done.
Don't let the bastards cheer you up.