Author Topic: Scottish Ale  (Read 2871 times)

Offline bierview

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Scottish Ale
« on: September 07, 2016, 12:56:08 PM »
I've been brewing this style for a few years and have never been able to get that creamy silky mouth feel.  I've tried a thin  mash at higher temperatures, adding carapils, flaked oats or barley and still never got to the point where I was satisfied.  Any secrets out there that I am missing?  I should also mention that I bottle and don't keg.

Thanks

Offline Stevie

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Re: Scottish Ale
« Reply #1 on: September 07, 2016, 02:13:45 PM »
I've never felt that a scottish ale should be creamy. IMO it should be malty in flavor yet dry, medium body. Maybe try a lower level of carbonation.

Offline reverseapachemaster

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Re: Scottish Ale
« Reply #2 on: September 07, 2016, 02:35:25 PM »
What beers are you trying to emulate?
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Offline toby

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Re: Scottish Ale
« Reply #3 on: September 07, 2016, 03:25:10 PM »
I've never felt that a scottish ale should be creamy. IMO it should be malty in flavor yet dry, medium body. Maybe try a lower level of carbonation.

This.

Offline dmtaylor

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Re: Scottish Ale
« Reply #4 on: September 07, 2016, 04:10:36 PM »
Style naziism aside, if you want a full creamy body, nothing works better than some rye.  Rye malt or flaked rye at a rate of about 15-20% will help a lot with this.  It might be "cheating" but I'll be damned if it won't fix your issue.
Dave

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Offline Stevie

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Scottish Ale
« Reply #5 on: September 07, 2016, 04:33:05 PM »
The OP was asking about a specific style. Maybe he is trying for a Scott-ish ale. Yuck yuck yuck

Maybe a bit of lactose would help.

Offline Phil_M

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Re: Scottish Ale
« Reply #6 on: September 07, 2016, 04:36:10 PM »
Perhaps the OP was referring to a nitro or cask version? Oscar Blue's "Old Chub" on nitro is certainly "creamy". I'd imagine a cask version would also be "creamy".
Corn is a fine adjunct in beer.

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Offline yso191

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Re: Scottish Ale
« Reply #7 on: September 07, 2016, 04:43:04 PM »
Style naziism aside, if you want a full creamy body, nothing works better than some rye.  Rye malt or flaked rye at a rate of about 15-20% will help a lot with this.  It might be "cheating" but I'll be damned if it won't fix your issue.

Interesting.  I'm familiar with the flavor contribution of rye malt, what does flaked rye contribute in terms of flavor?  In a 5 gallon batch, does the amount of flaked rye it would take to add creaminess also cross the flavor contribution threshold (can one taste it)?
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Offline denny

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Re: Scottish Ale
« Reply #8 on: September 07, 2016, 04:47:00 PM »
Style naziism aside, if you want a full creamy body, nothing works better than some rye.  Rye malt or flaked rye at a rate of about 15-20% will help a lot with this.  It might be "cheating" but I'll be damned if it won't fix your issue.

Actually in this case, 1450 would work better than rye.
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Offline denny

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Re: Scottish Ale
« Reply #9 on: September 07, 2016, 04:47:33 PM »
I've been brewing this style for a few years and have never been able to get that creamy silky mouth feel.  I've tried a thin  mash at higher temperatures, adding carapils, flaked oats or barley and still never got to the point where I was satisfied.  Any secrets out there that I am missing?  I should also mention that I bottle and don't keg.

Thanks

Try using Wy1450.
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Offline dmtaylor

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Re: Scottish Ale
« Reply #10 on: September 07, 2016, 04:55:40 PM »
I'm familiar with the flavor contribution of rye malt, what does flaked rye contribute in terms of flavor?  In a 5 gallon batch, does the amount of flaked rye it would take to add creaminess also cross the flavor contribution threshold (can one taste it)?

I've used rye malt numerous times at average rates of about 40% of the grist.  It honestly doesn't have a huge flavor impact, certainly not "spicy" like everyone says.  At 15-20% I don't think anyone will really even notice the flavor.  However, Denny will be sure to remind me that he thinks it's spicy, and I'm coming to believe that the flavor contribution or lack thereof is largely dependent on which brand is selected.

I have not used flaked rye so I can't really comment on that.  I believe it will have a very similar and perhaps even more significant effect, but haven't tested it yet myself.

If you're concerned about "spiciness" (lions and tigers and bears, oh my!) then stay down low at 10-15% where I'm really quite confident that it won't be overpowering at all.  Same advice would apply to the malt or the flaked, either way, I would think, with flaked having possibly even more significant impact to body and fullness, not sure about flavors.
Dave

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Offline dmtaylor

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Re: Scottish Ale
« Reply #11 on: September 07, 2016, 04:58:32 PM »
Actually in this case, 1450 would work better than rye.

Denny's Favorite 50?  Who the hell is this Denny guy, anyway, and what makes his yeast so awesome over mine or anyone else's?

;) I kid, I kid.  However I must admit I still never used that yeast.  Need to try it sometime for sure.
Dave

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Offline denny

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Re: Scottish Ale
« Reply #12 on: September 07, 2016, 05:01:44 PM »
Actually in this case, 1450 would work better than rye.

Denny's Favorite 50?  Who the hell is this Denny guy, anyway, and what makes his yeast so awesome over mine or anyone else's?

;) I kid, I kid.  However I must admit I still never used that yeast.  Need to try it sometime for sure.

It would get him the mouthfeel he's looking for without the flavor of the rye.
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Offline denny

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Re: Scottish Ale
« Reply #13 on: September 07, 2016, 05:02:56 PM »
I've used rye malt numerous times at average rates of about 40% of the grist.  It honestly doesn't have a huge flavor impact, certainly not "spicy" like everyone says.  At 15-20% I don't think anyone will really even notice the flavor.  However, Denny will be sure to remind me that he thinks it's spicy, and I'm coming to believe that the flavor contribution or lack thereof is largely dependent on which brand is selected.

I have not used flaked rye so I can't really comment on that.  I believe it will have a very similar and perhaps even more significant effect, but haven't tested it yet myself.

If you're concerned about "spiciness" (lions and tigers and bears, oh my!) then stay down low at 10-15% where I'm really quite confident that it won't be overpowering at all.  Same advice would apply to the malt or the flaked, either way, I would think, with flaked having possibly even more significant impact to body and fullness, not sure about flavors.

When "everyone" but you says something, it may be time to re-examine your point of view.  ;)  FWIW, I use Briess rye malt.
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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Scottish Ale
« Reply #14 on: September 07, 2016, 05:07:53 PM »

It would get him the mouthfeel he's looking for without the flavor of the rye.


Yep
Jon H.