Author Topic: Propane plumbing  (Read 1612 times)

Offline daphatgrant

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Propane plumbing
« on: September 14, 2016, 04:51:51 PM »
Update:
Here we go again, this is the one I am going to go with unless someone points out an issue. I'll update this again after I get everything and I see if it works. Thanks for putting up with my excessive updating :).

1. BG14 Burner
2. LP Orifice
3. 1' lpg hose - 3/8"SAE x 1/4" NPTF
4. 1/4" Black iron elbow
5. Needle valve
6. 1/4" Black iron tee
7. 1/4" Black iron nipple
8. 1/4"NPTF x 3/8"SAE adapter
9. Regulator w/hose 3/8"SAE




----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Hello AHA, I've been lurking for a while but this is my first post. I built a brew stand a while ago and only have a few things left to do with the biggest being plumbing the propane. My goal is to hook up my propane tank to 2 burners with a needle valve for each. Below is the list of items I have so far.

40lb propane tank
(2) BC BG14 Burners
BC 5HPR-40 regulator
(2) BC Needle valves
3' 1/4" black iron pipe
Black iron tee 1/4"

My biggest problems are finding out how to hook the hose that comes off of the regulator to the black iron pipe, and finding which hose type to run from the needle valve to the actual burners. I've seen multiple people using what I'd call flex pipe/hose but the pressure ratings on these seem to be around 1/2 psi.

Here are a couple pics of what I have and what I'm looking to do with it. Thanks for any help :).





« Last Edit: September 14, 2016, 10:18:47 PM by daphatgrant »

Offline kramerog

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Re: Propane plumbing
« Reply #1 on: September 14, 2016, 07:25:15 PM »
The pressure between the needle valve and the burner should be very low because the burner is open to the atmosphere. One the issue of safety and pressure, having a regulator that goes up to 40 psi seems like overkill.  I would think that 1 psi is plenty.

It appears you need a 3/8" male flare fitting at the end of the black pipe for connecting to the regulator hose.

Offline daphatgrant

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Re: Propane plumbing
« Reply #2 on: September 14, 2016, 07:29:28 PM »
I've spent most of the day looking and I believe that this might do it? If anyone knows let me know.

1. BG14
2. LP Orifice
3. 3/8" compression x 1/4" NPT
4. 5' 1/4" propane hose
5. Black iron elbow
6. Needle valve
7. Black iron tee
8. Black iron nipple
9. Black iron coupler
10. 1/4" NPT x 3/8" compression
11. Regulator w/hose


Offline daphatgrant

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Re: Propane plumbing
« Reply #3 on: September 14, 2016, 07:37:02 PM »
The pressure between the needle valve and the burner should be very low because the burner is open to the atmosphere. One the issue of safety and pressure, having a regulator that goes up to 40 psi seems like overkill.  I would think that 1 psi is plenty.

It appears you need a 3/8" male flare fitting at the end of the black pipe for connecting to the regulator hose.

Thanks for the response! It's funny but there aren't many good parts descriptions out there, hopefully when I get all of this done this will help.

I agree with you that the regulator is probably overkill but I've already got it so it'll have to do. I did hook it directly to the burner and ran it and it worked great.

In regards to connecting the hose to the pipe I think that this combined with the coupler should do it.

Offline daphatgrant

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Re: Propane plumbing
« Reply #4 on: September 14, 2016, 08:14:02 PM »
I modified the previous plan and removed the fitting after the orifice and found a 3/8" compression x 1/4" npt propane hose.




Hose
https://gashosesandregulators.com/Replacement-Hoses/51
« Last Edit: September 14, 2016, 08:16:16 PM by daphatgrant »

Offline daphatgrant

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Re: Propane plumbing
« Reply #5 on: September 14, 2016, 08:56:57 PM »
Here we go again, this is the one I am going to go with unless someone points out an issue. I'll update this again after I get everything and I see if it works. Thanks for putting up with my excessive updating :).

1. BG14 Burner
2. LP Orifice
3. 1' lpg hose - 3/8"SAE x 1/4" NPTF
4. Black iron elbow
5. Needle valve
6. Black iron tee
7. Black iron nipple
8. 1/4"NPTF x 3/8"SAE adapter
9. Regulator w/hose 3/8"SAE



Offline kramerog

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Re: Propane plumbing
« Reply #6 on: September 14, 2016, 10:15:13 PM »
At the risk of asking this question again, shouldn't items 3 & 8 have 1/2" NPT because the black pipe is 1/2"?

Offline daphatgrant

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Re: Propane plumbing
« Reply #7 on: September 14, 2016, 10:17:36 PM »
At the risk of asking this question again, shouldn't items 3 & 8 have 1/2" NPT because the black pipe is 1/2"?
That needs needs to be corrected, I'm going to switch the black iron pipe over to 1/4". Thanks :D.

Offline kramerog

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Re: Propane plumbing
« Reply #8 on: September 14, 2016, 10:35:23 PM »
1/4" everywhere seems small especially for the piping common to both burners, but I suppose that you have plenty of pressure (up to 40 psi) to burn.

Offline daphatgrant

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Re: Propane plumbing
« Reply #9 on: September 14, 2016, 10:55:56 PM »
1/4" everywhere seems small especially for the piping common to both burners, but I suppose that you have plenty of pressure (up to 40 psi) to burn.
Hmm... I changed it to 1/4" because it was cheaper and I would need fewer adapters/steps to get it all put together. My other thought was that if the propane was being forced down to 1/4" when it enters the orifice than it wouldn't matter if the pipe were 1/4" or 2" as long as it wasn't smaller than 1/4".

Offline Stevie

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Re: Propane plumbing
« Reply #10 on: September 14, 2016, 11:08:36 PM »
Don't cheap out here. Your talking pennies in the long run and will just upgrade later.

Offline satchman

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Re: Propane plumbing
« Reply #11 on: September 14, 2016, 11:19:33 PM »
1/4" everywhere seems small especially for the piping common to both burners, but I suppose that you have plenty of pressure (up to 40 psi) to burn.
Hmm... I changed it to 1/4" because it was cheaper and I would need fewer adapters/steps to get it all put together. My other thought was that if the propane was being forced down to 1/4" when it enters the orifice than it wouldn't matter if the pipe were 1/4" or 2" as long as it wasn't smaller than 1/4".
The pipe size only matters for frictional loses caused by the propane velocity. If you estimate the pipe lengths, I can run the calc pretty quickly.

Sent from my XT1053 using Tapatalk


Offline daphatgrant

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Re: Propane plumbing
« Reply #12 on: September 14, 2016, 11:32:21 PM »
1/4" everywhere seems small especially for the piping common to both burners, but I suppose that you have plenty of pressure (up to 40 psi) to burn.
Hmm... I changed it to 1/4" because it was cheaper and I would need fewer adapters/steps to get it all put together. My other thought was that if the propane was being forced down to 1/4" when it enters the orifice than it wouldn't matter if the pipe were 1/4" or 2" as long as it wasn't smaller than 1/4".
The pipe size only matters for frictional loses caused by the propane velocity. If you estimate the pipe lengths, I can run the calc pretty quickly.

Sent from my XT1053 using Tapatalk

I'll be using 3' of 1/4" pipe.

Thanks!

Offline satchman

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Re: Propane plumbing
« Reply #13 on: September 15, 2016, 02:40:51 AM »
Calcs are run, the short answer is go with the 1/4" nps pipe. The pressure drop in the pipe will be around 0.3 psi.

Long answer:
I thought this was going to be a simple thing to model. However, I forgot about the state change that occurs when the LPG pressure drops below about 20 psi. In true engineering form I assumed that the state change isn't occurring until the propane gets to the burner because its easier and I believe more conservative pressure drop wise. See below:

Bayou Classic BG14-210,000/hr Btu
Propane- 91,000Btu/gal
Flowrate per burner-2.3 gal/hr
Total pressure drop in piping- 0.3 psi
Picture is the model used to calculate pressure drop using the darby w. method.


Offline daphatgrant

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Re: Propane plumbing
« Reply #14 on: September 15, 2016, 02:47:45 AM »
Calcs are run, the short answer is go with the 1/4" nps pipe. The pressure drop in the pipe will be around 0.3 psi.

Long answer:
I thought this was going to be a simple thing to model. However, I forgot about the state change that occurs when the LPG pressure drops below about 20 psi. In true engineering form I assumed that the state change isn't occurring until the propane gets to the burner because its easier and I believe more conservative pressure drop wise. See below:

Bayou Classic BG14-210,000/hr Btu
Propane- 91,000Btu/gal
Flowrate per burner-2.3 gal/hr
Total pressure drop in piping- 0.3 psi
Picture is the model used to calculate pressure drop using the darby w. method.



Thanks! :D