Author Topic: Done with hefes  (Read 7692 times)

Offline pkrone

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Re: Done with hefes
« Reply #15 on: September 28, 2016, 01:52:14 PM »
I tried lots of different weissbiers while in Bavaria this past summer.  All were really good, but some were better than others.     Weihenstephaner was the best of all I tried, so if you're trying to equal that you're definitely aiming high.  I brewed a weissbier when we got back from Germany using a recipe from the Weyermann website.  Didn't do anything too fancy, but I did watch the pH closely.   It turned out awesome and sadly the keg blew the other night.   So, just keep trying.
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Offline JJeffers09

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Re: Done with hefes
« Reply #16 on: September 28, 2016, 02:39:07 PM »
I love the style, I will continue to improve my process.  Unfortuneatly I seem to be with you in the minority of Americans that love hefes.  My tastes prefer Ayinger Ur Weisse and Bräu Weisse though,  the it factor is all about open fermentation and pitchrates.  Most Bavarian yeasts struggle under pressure among other factors...
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Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Done with hefes
« Reply #17 on: September 28, 2016, 04:08:50 PM »
I tried lots of different weissbiers while in Bavaria this past summer.  All were really good, but some were better than others.     Weihenstephaner was the best of all I tried, so if you're trying to equal that you're definitely aiming high.  I brewed a weissbier when we got back from Germany using a recipe from the Weyermann website.  Didn't do anything too fancy, but I did watch the pH closely.   It turned out awesome and sadly the keg blew the other night.   So, just keep trying.
It is always fun to sample the beers at the source. Weissbier seems to be more popular than I remembered, just got back Sept 15. It is a style I don't appreciate, just don't like the phenolics and banana. The only one I tried was from the wife's sampler try at Schnitzlbaumer in Traunstein, it was all clove, not for me!

As an aside, Zwickelbier/Kellerbier/Ungespundet beers seem to be very popular too.
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Offline zwiller

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Re: Done with hefes
« Reply #18 on: September 28, 2016, 05:02:56 PM »
My first Hefe won an award at my club contest; haven't reproduced that again yet - it must have been made at the right time of the year/ temp in the basement - I recall keeping it at 62F for the first few days with ice bottles in the chill bag in the basement.  Last one I did was a clovey flavored phenol bomb, so I think I went too cold on it....elusive son of a gun to get it just right.
I am not sure if I've ever bested the first one I did that was extract but maybe it's just my memory.  It's funny, I am not alone.  There are reports of other guys saying the same thing.  I've seen speculation that Briess does some really authentic mashing including the ferulic acid rest. 
Sam
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Offline zwiller

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Re: Done with hefes
« Reply #19 on: September 28, 2016, 05:40:34 PM »
I feel the same way about my homebrewed marzens, and pretty much any German imports.  I can try to make it myself, but it's never quite as good as the real thing.  Maybe I should just give up trying.  But I don't, and especially don't because some of my friends I know can brew world-class German beers successfully.  So, I keep trying.  Maybe I personally just don't have what it takes.  I can admit defeat, meanwhile hoping that maybe it's only temporary and I'll eventually succeed later.  That said, I've come real close on a Vienna lager, real close.
I don't know if you've heard, but there is supposedly a way you CAN make them like the real thing... just sayin', give it a try.

Same for you, Sam. I think the missing link has been revealed, just a matter of making that leap...

I've made some good hefes, they're close to my favorite German ones, but they still miss that rich, fresh lingering malt character that all the best German beers have. Close, but not quite... don't give up, man. That's what's fun about brewing, is that quest for perfection.

EDIT: oops, I see someone's already brought IT up ;)
Oh and Jeff brought it up: skimming/top cropping the yeast has made a difference for me, I think.

I don't know about IT in a hefe.  I don't care for Hafbrau Hefe, IT takes away from the yeast character.  Still dang good beer.  Open ferments/skimming might something to fool with.  Never did that.  So I suppose I have something to try.   
Sam
Sandusky, OH

Online dmtaylor

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Re: Done with hefes
« Reply #20 on: September 28, 2016, 05:47:43 PM »
Is skimming all there is to "it"?  Heck, that's way too easy.  I'll give it a try next time.
Dave

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Offline erockrph

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Re: Done with hefes
« Reply #21 on: September 28, 2016, 06:06:18 PM »
Since it is fairly common for traditional hefe's to be open fermented, it would seem that LODO wouldn't be a factor, right?
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Offline Phil_M

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Re: Done with hefes
« Reply #22 on: September 28, 2016, 06:29:01 PM »
LODO in the "modern" sense, possibly not. But, since the yeast will be actively scrubbing O2 it may still work...
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Offline natebriscoe

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Re: Done with hefes
« Reply #23 on: September 28, 2016, 06:30:23 PM »
Since it is fairly common for traditional hefe's to be open fermented, it would seem that LODO wouldn't be a factor, right?
Lodo is really only about the mashing. Everything after pitching is just good practice on limiting oxidation and maintaining everything done in a lodo mash.

Offline brewinhard

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Re: Done with hefes
« Reply #24 on: September 28, 2016, 06:30:48 PM »
One thing that I saw in the breweries that make Hefeweizen beer is that they open ferment in round fermenters, and there is a trough that lets the braunhefe flow out.

Interesting. Thanks for the insight.

Offline brewinhard

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Re: Done with hefes
« Reply #25 on: September 28, 2016, 06:31:50 PM »
I make a hefe as good as anyone I have tasted, and I have tasted them fresh on tap in Vienna.

OG 1.048, 18 IBUs, 5 gallons

6 lbs. wheat malt
3 lbs. pils malt
1 lb. munich malt

All German malts.  4 lbs of German pale ale malt can be substituted for the pils and munich.

Double decoction mash

110°F for 15 min, pull decoction, raise decoction to 155°F for 15 min, bring to boil for 10 min, add back to mash tun to raise to 140°.  Immediately pull another decoction, raise to decoction to 155°F for 15 min, bring to boil for 10 min, add back to mash tun to raise to 155°F.  Rest for 30 min and sparge.

0.75 oz. Tettnanger 60 min
0.25 oz. Tettnanger 15 min (adjust according to your AAUs to get to 18 IBUs)

Boil 90 min.  Pitch with WY3333 (this is very important, no starter needed if yeast is fresh).

Beer is best fermented in a week, chilled, force-carbed, and drank in a week.

ferment schedule for that strain?

Offline beersk

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Re: Done with hefes
« Reply #26 on: September 28, 2016, 08:09:25 PM »
Is skimming all there is to "it"?  Heck, that's way too easy.  I'll give it a try next time.
No, I'm certain there is that certain malt richness in the hefes as well and it does lend a desired character to the beer. Skimming isn't the only way to get it but it definitely helps get you a smoother character.
Since it is fairly common for traditional hefe's to be open fermented, it would seem that LODO wouldn't be a factor, right?
Why not? They transfer it to a tank to be spunded before the beer is done. What natebriscoe said also...

Offline Rhoobarb

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Re: Done with hefes
« Reply #27 on: September 28, 2016, 09:09:18 PM »

... Pitch with WY3333 (this is very important, no starter needed if yeast is fresh). ...


Why the WY3333 and not the WY3068?  Just curious.
« Last Edit: September 28, 2016, 09:24:58 PM by Rhoobarb »
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Offline chumley

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Re: Done with hefes
« Reply #28 on: September 28, 2016, 09:14:43 PM »
I find WY3333 to be more balanced, with more fruit, little clove and little banana, whereas I find WY3068 to be more one-dimensional with the clove/banana, especially the clove (not a big fan of the clove). Just my personal preference.

I ferment WY3333 in the low to mid 60s.  Give that strain a try. 

Offline narvin

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Re: Done with hefes
« Reply #29 on: September 28, 2016, 11:19:00 PM »
My favorite weissbier had:

Ferulic acid rest
Double decoction
A touch of caravienna
WLP380
Ferment at 62 in a semi-open fermenter (vittles fault, loose lid)

Not saying that all or any of these things were important.  But it was a damn good beer.