Author Topic: Dark ESB  (Read 1578 times)

Offline deadpoetic0077

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Dark ESB
« on: September 27, 2016, 05:19:04 PM »
Going for a Dark ESB here. Any reccomendations? Ive never used EKG hops so im not sure if I have everything right on those. Also I have never adjusted water before but for this style, I want to give it a try! Do those numbers look correct? Do I need to buy individual minerals? Or can I use baking soda to get my bicarbonate and sodium? What about the rest of them?

HOME BREW RECIPE:
Title: Nicks ESB

Brew Method: BIAB
Style Name: Dark ESB
Boil Time: 60 min
Batch Size: 3 gallons (fermentor volume)
Boil Size: 5.2 gallons
Boil Gravity: 1.033
Efficiency: 74% (brew house)


STATS:
Original Gravity: 1.057
Final Gravity: 1.018
ABV (standard): 5.2%
IBU (tinseth): 34.33
SRM (morey): 28.23

FERMENTABLES:
0.5 lb - United Kingdom - Extra Dark Crystal 120L (8%)
5.5 lb - United Kingdom - Maris Otter Pale (88%)
0.25 lb - United Kingdom - Roasted Barley (4%)

HOPS:
0.75 oz - EKG, Type: Pellet, AA: 5, Use: Boil for 60 min, IBU: 27.65
0.5 oz - EKG, Type: Pellet, AA: 5, Use: Boil for 10 min, IBU: 6.68

MASH GUIDELINES:
1) Temp: 155 F, Time: 60 min, Amount: 5.2 gal

OTHER INGREDIENTS:
0.75 tsp - Irish Moss, Time: 10 min, Type: Fining, Use: Boil

YEAST:
Wyeast - English Special Bitter 1768
Starter: yes
Form: Liquid
Attenuation (avg): 70%
Flocculation: High
Optimum Temp: 64 - 72 F
Fermentation Temp: 65 F
Pitch Rate: 0.35 (M cells / ml / deg P)

PRIMING:
Method: table sugar
CO2 Level: 2.0 Volumes

TARGET WATER PROFILE:
Profile Name: London (Porter, dark ales)
Ca2: 100
Mg2: 5
Na: 35
Cl: 60
SO4: 50
HCO3: 265
Water Notes:



Offline dilluh98

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Re: Dark ESB
« Reply #1 on: September 27, 2016, 08:36:34 PM »
IMO, I generally wouldn't add sodium bicarbonate to get specific values for Na+ or HCO3- as they don't really contribute positively to the flavor of the beer (or the health of the fermentation). I'll use NaHCO3 for pH adjustment in a pinch but I've mostly switched to lime, Ca(OH)2, for that purpose.

Offline Steve Ruch

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Re: Dark ESB
« Reply #2 on: September 27, 2016, 09:45:45 PM »
Where are you located? Once dechlorinated your water might be good as is.
About the only thing I do to my water is make sure there's no chlorine, although I do mix in some distilled water when I brew a Czech pils.
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Offline kramerog

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Re: Dark ESB
« Reply #3 on: September 27, 2016, 10:26:46 PM »
The use of regional water profiles as a target is largely outdated.  In a nutshell, you want enough calcium for yeast health and for clarification; proper mash pH; and appropriate levels of sulfate and chloride for flavor.  Depending on your water there may not be any adjustment necessary.  What do you know about the water you use?  How have your mashes gone before?

Offline erockrph

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Re: Dark ESB
« Reply #4 on: September 28, 2016, 01:21:00 AM »
From a recipe standpoint, I think everything looks good except for the FG. I'd mash lower and/or sub in some sugar for part of the Maris Otter. I'd want to get this in the 1.010-1.014 ballpark, otherwise it will be a bit too sweet.
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Offline goschman

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Re: Dark ESB
« Reply #5 on: September 28, 2016, 01:39:25 AM »
How about some English chocolate malt instead of roasted barley? Just a thought.
On Tap/Bottled: Kurbis Marzen, Red Rye, Vienna Lager, Dry Hopped Peach Cider       

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Offline deadpoetic0077

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Re: Dark ESB
« Reply #6 on: September 29, 2016, 01:38:01 PM »
From a recipe standpoint, I think everything looks good except for the FG. I'd mash lower and/or sub in some sugar for part of the Maris Otter. I'd want to get this in the 1.010-1.014 ballpark, otherwise it will be a bit too sweet.

That's a good idea. I think I may do that. I agree that that FG may be a bit high.

How about some English chocolate malt instead of roasted barley? Just a thought.

I was wondering about this. The roasted barley was intended to darken it up a bit and add a little roasty character to it. Do you think the chocolate malt will add this as well? I have never used either malt. Im only on brew #7 or 8 :P

Offline deadpoetic0077

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Re: Dark ESB
« Reply #7 on: September 29, 2016, 01:42:31 PM »
Where are you located? Once dechlorinated your water might be good as is.
About the only thing I do to my water is make sure there's no chlorine, although I do mix in some distilled water when I brew a Czech pils.
Im in Jax FL, which the water where I live is not good for brewing. it is SUPER SUPER hard. Like 400+ in my area. Other places around jax are OK for brewing from what I have heard.

The use of regional water profiles as a target is largely outdated.  In a nutshell, you want enough calcium for yeast health and for clarification; proper mash pH; and appropriate levels of sulfate and chloride for flavor.  Depending on your water there may not be any adjustment necessary.  What do you know about the water you use?  How have your mashes gone before?

I have not used my municipal water before. I have always used "drinking water" from my supermarket and it has worked well for me. I have never tested/ adjusted PH before for the mash though so I think If I do that it would make a difference. That may be where I start before going down the rabbit hole of adding salts to the water.

If I am not mistaken, the regional profiles are a bit outdated like you said, but sometimes adding some of the water profile additions of the locations water can help elevate certain aspects of the beer. However, I am a novice at this part so I could be way off :P

Offline goschman

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Re: Dark ESB
« Reply #8 on: September 29, 2016, 01:43:07 PM »
From a recipe standpoint, I think everything looks good except for the FG. I'd mash lower and/or sub in some sugar for part of the Maris Otter. I'd want to get this in the 1.010-1.014 ballpark, otherwise it will be a bit too sweet.

That's a good idea. I think I may do that. I agree that that FG may be a bit high.

How about some English chocolate malt instead of roasted barley? Just a thought.

I was wondering about this. The roasted barley was intended to darken it up a bit and add a little roasty character to it. Do you think the chocolate malt will add this as well? I have never used either malt. Im only on brew #7 or 8 :P

To be honest, the only roasted malt I normally use is carafa.

I believe that most english chocolate malts are very dark so it should be able to help you with color and should provide some roast but less than roasted barley. Someone with more experience with these malts in particular can chime in...

At 1-2% I would say it probably wouldn't make a difference but at 4% I am not so sure.
« Last Edit: September 29, 2016, 01:45:34 PM by goschman »
On Tap/Bottled: Kurbis Marzen, Red Rye, Vienna Lager, Dry Hopped Peach Cider       

Fermenting: Imperial Porter, Hopfenbier
Up Next: Maibock, Braunbier

Offline dilluh98

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Re: Dark ESB
« Reply #9 on: September 29, 2016, 02:46:06 PM »
My standard bitters recipe has 1% pale chocolate malt. It's mostly for color addition and I haven't done a side by side without that addition, but I do think it does give a touch of chocolate/roast character that gives a bit more interest to the malt side as the remainder of the grain bill is 7% torrified wheat + 92% MO. I'd agree that roasted barley may be a bit too much roast character but it's not a bad idea to add a touch of a dark malt to your bitters.

Offline deadpoetic0077

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Re: Dark ESB
« Reply #10 on: September 29, 2016, 06:04:56 PM »
My standard bitters recipe has 1% pale chocolate malt. It's mostly for color addition and I haven't done a side by side without that addition, but I do think it does give a touch of chocolate/roast character that gives a bit more interest to the malt side as the remainder of the grain bill is 7% torrified wheat + 92% MO. I'd agree that roasted barley may be a bit too much roast character but it's not a bad idea to add a touch of a dark malt to your bitters.

That sounds like a good recipe. Ill have to look up terrified wheat... never used that before. Does that just help with head retention?

From a recipe standpoint, I think everything looks good except for the FG. I'd mash lower and/or sub in some sugar for part of the Maris Otter. I'd want to get this in the 1.010-1.014 ballpark, otherwise it will be a bit too sweet.

That's a good idea. I think I may do that. I agree that that FG may be a bit high.

How about some English chocolate malt instead of roasted barley? Just a thought.

I was wondering about this. The roasted barley was intended to darken it up a bit and add a little roasty character to it. Do you think the chocolate malt will add this as well? I have never used either malt. Im only on brew #7 or 8 :P

To be honest, the only roasted malt I normally use is carafa.

I believe that most english chocolate malts are very dark so it should be able to help you with color and should provide some roast but less than roasted barley. Someone with more experience with these malts in particular can chime in...

At 1-2% I would say it probably wouldn't make a difference but at 4% I am not so sure.

That was my other concern, that 4% was too much for the roasted barley, but it seems like chocolate may be the way to go.

Offline Stevie

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Dark ESB
« Reply #11 on: September 29, 2016, 07:16:15 PM »
You think your water is hard, my water hardness ranges from 500-900 depending on the sources used in that days blend.

Offline deadpoetic0077

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Re: Dark ESB
« Reply #12 on: September 29, 2016, 08:49:49 PM »
You think your water is hard, my water hardness ranges from 500-900 depending on the sources used in that days blend.

O_O holy hard... do rocks come out of your faucet? you could stone a man to death with your shower...

Offline erockrph

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Re: Dark ESB
« Reply #13 on: September 29, 2016, 10:07:58 PM »


My standard bitters recipe has 1% pale chocolate malt. It's mostly for color addition and I haven't done a side by side without that addition, but I do think it does give a touch of chocolate/roast character that gives a bit more interest to the malt side as the remainder of the grain bill is 7% torrified wheat + 92% MO. I'd agree that roasted barley may be a bit too much roast character but it's not a bad idea to add a touch of a dark malt to your bitters.

That sounds like a good recipe. Ill have to look up terrified wheat... never used that before. Does that just help with head retention?

No, it mainly just cowers in the corner

But seriously, torrified wheat does add head retention. It is very similar to flaked wheat in that regard. And it also has a characteristic nutty flavor that goes very nicely in English ales.
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Offline kramerog

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Re: Dark ESB
« Reply #14 on: September 29, 2016, 11:02:51 PM »
Where are you located? Once dechlorinated your water might be good as is.
About the only thing I do to my water is make sure there's no chlorine, although I do mix in some distilled water when I brew a Czech pils.
Im in Jax FL, which the water where I live is not good for brewing. it is SUPER SUPER hard. Like 400+ in my area. Other places around jax are OK for brewing from what I have heard.

The use of regional water profiles as a target is largely outdated.  In a nutshell, you want enough calcium for yeast health and for clarification; proper mash pH; and appropriate levels of sulfate and chloride for flavor.  Depending on your water there may not be any adjustment necessary.  What do you know about the water you use?  How have your mashes gone before?

I have not used my municipal water before. I have always used "drinking water" from my supermarket and it has worked well for me. I have never tested/ adjusted PH before for the mash though so I think If I do that it would make a difference. That may be where I start before going down the rabbit hole of adding salts to the water.

If I am not mistaken, the regional profiles are a bit outdated like you said, but sometimes adding some of the water profile additions of the locations water can help elevate certain aspects of the beer. However, I am a novice at this part so I could be way off

From a recipe standpoint, I think everything looks good except for the FG. I'd mash lower and/or sub in some sugar for part of the Maris Otter. I'd want to get this in the 1.010-1.014 ballpark, otherwise it will be a bit too sweet.

That's a good idea. I think I may do that. I agree that that FG may be a bit high.

How about some English chocolate malt instead of roasted barley? Just a thought.

I was wondering about this. The roasted barley was intended to darken it up a bit and add a little roasty character to it. Do you think the chocolate malt will add this as well? I have never used either malt. Im only on brew #7 or 8

To be honest, the only roasted malt I normally use is carafa.

I believe that most english chocolate malts are very dark so it should be able to help you with color and should provide some roast but less than roasted barley. Someone with more experience with these malts in particular can chime in...

At 1-2% I would say it probably wouldn't make a difference but at 4% I am not so sure.
Sounds like going back to store-bought water would be the way to go and then add appropriate amounts of CaSO4 and/or CaCl2 for the style.