Author Topic: gose without sour mash?  (Read 2124 times)

Online denny

  • Administrator
  • Retired with too much time on my hands
  • *****
  • Posts: 21462
  • Noti OR [1991.4, 287.6deg] AR
    • Dennybrew
Re: gose without sour mash?
« Reply #15 on: September 20, 2016, 09:42:40 PM »
we did our first kettle sour Gose this year. Turned out great (for the kids who like that crap, not me. Yuck). We cooled the kettle down to 80 and pitched a Lacto culture from Wyeast. Let it sit 3 days until the pH hit 3.2. Was amazed at how fast the pH dropped.

Granted, this was on a 15 bbl batch so not sure how much faster or slower a 10 gallon batch would be. It would certainly be depending on how healthy your culture is and how warm you keep the lacto.

I should send ya some yogurt to try....
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell

Offline pete b

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 3168
  • Barre, Ma
Re: gose without sour mash?
« Reply #16 on: September 20, 2016, 10:39:11 PM »
O agree with the kettle souring.  A lot of people use probiotics as their lacto source.  Around here, brewers use Nancy's Yogurt, which has a huge live lactobacillus population.

How does that work? A cup of yogurt into the mash? boil? fermenting vessel?

Goes in post boil.  Then you keep the wort warm for a few days.  At Oakshire, they do it last thing on Fri. since they don't work on weekends.  They leave the kettle and whirlpool full of warm wort.  Put in the yogurt, seal them with plastic wrap and close the lids.  By the time they come back on Mon. morning it's going great.
Interesting. Does this result in a finished beer that still has a live culture?
Don't let the bastards cheer you up.

Online denny

  • Administrator
  • Retired with too much time on my hands
  • *****
  • Posts: 21462
  • Noti OR [1991.4, 287.6deg] AR
    • Dennybrew
Re: gose without sour mash?
« Reply #17 on: September 21, 2016, 04:24:17 PM »
Interesting. Does this result in a finished beer that still has a live culture?

Good question...my guess would be yes, but it's only a guess.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell

Offline pete b

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 3168
  • Barre, Ma
Re: gose without sour mash?
« Reply #18 on: September 21, 2016, 05:26:38 PM »
Interesting. Does this result in a finished beer that still has a live culture?

Good question...my guess would be yes, but it's only a guess.
I'll have to add gose (wort soured type) to my daily doses of yogurt and kim chi!
Don't let the bastards cheer you up.

Offline danpixley

  • 1st Kit
  • *
  • Posts: 17
    • My YouTube
Re: gose without sour mash?
« Reply #19 on: October 24, 2016, 10:07:55 PM »
O agree with the kettle souring.  A lot of people use probiotics as their lacto source.  Around here, brewers use Nancy's Yogurt, which has a huge live lactobacillus population.

How does that work? A cup of yogurt into the mash? boil? fermenting vessel?

Goes in post boil.  Then you keep the wort warm for a few days.  At Oakshire, they do it last thing on Fri. since they don't work on weekends.  They leave the kettle and whirlpool full of warm wort.  Put in the yogurt, seal them with plastic wrap and close the lids.  By the time they come back on Mon. morning it's going great.
Interesting. Does this result in a finished beer that still has a live culture?

The culture will be alive in the beer if they do not boil after the the lactic acid bacteria fermentation (most breweries do boil after the wort is soured but before pitching yeast; this is called "kettle souring").  Viability in beer that is not pasteurized drops off pretty quickly with Lactobacillus, depending on the species/strain.  Lab cultures and most likely probiotics usually don't survive well in beer over long periods of time.  This is why juice/liquid probiotics have a short shelf life.  Wild strains that commercial brewers re-use over and over are usually much more resilient under the stressful conditions of beer (which is why using commercial beer dregs can produce great results). 
Milk The Funk Wiki Editor - http://www.milkthefunk.com/wiki

Offline majorvices

  • Global Moderator
  • I must live here
  • *****
  • Posts: 9861
  • Polka. If its too loud you're too young.
    • Yellowhammer Brewing Company
Re: gose without sour mash?
« Reply #20 on: October 25, 2016, 12:26:25 AM »

Interesting. Does this result in a finished beer that still has a live culture?

we boiled after 3 days and the pH dropped to (IIRC) 3.8 or so. I don't want a live lacto strain living in my brewery right now. The sourness was clean. It turned out very nice (uhm, like I said, if that's your gig. ;) )

Offline majorvices

  • Global Moderator
  • I must live here
  • *****
  • Posts: 9861
  • Polka. If its too loud you're too young.
    • Yellowhammer Brewing Company
Re: gose without sour mash?
« Reply #21 on: October 25, 2016, 12:27:19 AM »
we did our first kettle sour Gose this year. Turned out great (for the kids who like that crap, not me. Yuck). We cooled the kettle down to 80 and pitched a Lacto culture from Wyeast. Let it sit 3 days until the pH hit 3.2. Was amazed at how fast the pH dropped.

Granted, this was on a 15 bbl batch so not sure how much faster or slower a 10 gallon batch would be. It would certainly be depending on how healthy your culture is and how warm you keep the lacto.

I should send ya some yogurt to try....

I have this aversion to adding milk to my beer.