Author Topic: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing  (Read 53087 times)

Offline PORTERHAUS

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 380
  • NW Indiana
    • View Profile
Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« Reply #1395 on: September 15, 2017, 06:41:17 PM »
There shouldn't be any left in the finished beer, unless the yeast produced it.  During oxygenation all the remaining sulfite should get used up before fermentation.

I don't know about temp dependence, I hope not.

So there isn't a measurable correlation between left over sulfites from SMB and Sulfur character in the finished beer?


Offline natebrews

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 480
    • View Profile
Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« Reply #1396 on: September 15, 2017, 06:47:33 PM »
I'm just saying that the sulfite should be gone at the end of oxygenation, you might have other sulfur compounds in there (sulfate for example) that are detectable though.  If you don't use up the sulfite with oxygenation, then I think you are more likely to have the yeast interact with it and produce unpleasant sulfur compounds. 

I believe this is how I have ended up with a couple fart beers.
Risk of failure should be no deterrent to trying.

Offline PORTERHAUS

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 380
  • NW Indiana
    • View Profile
Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« Reply #1397 on: September 15, 2017, 07:31:22 PM »
I see, I haven't experienced any issues with Sulfur...that I know of, I have only done a couple LODO trials. I will be getting my strips this weekend, so was curious to test say a finished batch of beer. Thanks for the reply.

Offline brewinhard

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 3197
    • View Profile
Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« Reply #1398 on: September 16, 2017, 04:54:16 PM »
I'm just saying that the sulfite should be gone at the end of oxygenation, you might have other sulfur compounds in there (sulfate for example) that are detectable though.  If you don't use up the sulfite with oxygenation, then I think you are more likely to have the yeast interact with it and produce unpleasant sulfur compounds. 

I believe this is how I have ended up with a couple fart beers.

I have been slowly dialing back my SBT amounts because of this as well. Not fart beers, but noticeable sulfur in the finished product. I am assuming it is from not properly expending all the remaining sulfites after the boil from a large enough dose of oxygen at pitching time. Currently I am working with 20 ppm, but will dial back to 15 ppm on my next round of brews to see if I can eliminate any sulfur issues.

Offline Andor

  • Assistant Brewer
  • ***
  • Posts: 128
    • View Profile
Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« Reply #1399 on: September 18, 2017, 01:18:01 AM »
Does using campden tablets to remover chlorine/chloramine factor in the SMB dosage rates?

Offline brewinhard

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 3197
    • View Profile
Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« Reply #1400 on: September 18, 2017, 02:05:26 PM »
Does using campden tablets to remover chlorine/chloramine factor in the SMB dosage rates?

I would say no, but it probably depends on how early you are adding the tablets to do their thing. If they are added the night before, any oxygen scavenging from the SMB would already be used up by the time you heat your strike water.