Author Topic: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing  (Read 84187 times)

Offline braufessor

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Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« Reply #930 on: January 08, 2017, 03:15:57 PM »
Just found this chart (I assume it is accurate??)..... 
1.9 grams to 5 gallons of mash and .5 grams to 5 gallons of sparge.
Seem about right?
http://forum.germanbrewing.net/viewtopic.php?f=48&t=346&sid=8d2885d03b93624afefd1280b38f1019

(I was avoiding math.)

The Beerery

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Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« Reply #931 on: January 08, 2017, 03:44:33 PM »
Just found this chart (I assume it is accurate??)..... 
1.9 grams to 5 gallons of mash and .5 grams to 5 gallons of sparge.
Seem about right?
http://forum.germanbrewing.net/viewtopic.php?f=48&t=346&sid=8d2885d03b93624afefd1280b38f1019

(I was avoiding math.)

Yes, sounds good.

Offline mabrungard

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Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« Reply #932 on: January 08, 2017, 05:00:39 PM »
Stays put. No floating.

I guess that approach seals off the mashing zone from the atmosphere, but there is a slug of oxygen under that lid that adds to the oxidation load. But that is why there is an excess of meta in the wort. But using that assumption, it appears that just using a well-fitting lid on the tun serves the same purpose. I've gone to a bit more trouble with the floating cap, but I'm not sure that its truly necessary. A wort return tube and a sheet of plastic bubble wrap might be just as good.
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Big Monk

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Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« Reply #933 on: January 08, 2017, 05:29:04 PM »
Stays put. No floating.

I guess that approach seals off the mashing zone from the atmosphere, but there is a slug of oxygen under that lid that adds to the oxidation load. But that is why there is an excess of meta in the wort. But using that assumption, it appears that just using a well-fitting lid on the tun serves the same purpose. I've gone to a bit more trouble with the floating cap, but I'm not sure that its truly necessary. A wort return tube and a sheet of plastic bubble wrap might be just as good.

It depends on your setup. Mine is set quite the same as Bryan's, whereas you set the lid right down on the liquid and recirculate with a flow rate that doesn't introduce an air pocket underneath.

All of these steps combined makes it so that dose rates for Meta can be reduced very low, on the order of 25 ppm with plenty of margin left pre-Boil.

Offline bboy9000

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Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« Reply #934 on: January 08, 2017, 06:52:13 PM »
Is it correct to assume that using a wort return tube requires a pump?
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Offline mabrungard

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Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« Reply #935 on: January 08, 2017, 06:59:11 PM »
Is it correct to assume that using a wort return tube requires a pump?

That is correct. In my opinion, pumping wort is a preferable method of 'mixing' your mash...move the wort and not the grain.
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Offline bjanat

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Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« Reply #936 on: January 08, 2017, 08:47:12 PM »
Is it correct to assume that using a wort return tube requires a pump?

That is correct. In my opinion, pumping wort is a preferable method of 'mixing' your mash...move the wort and not the grain.
Do you think pumping gives better results than mixing, or just more practical? I might go for something like this http://www.hobbybrauerversand.de/navi.php?a=2493&lang=eng with motor
http://www.hobbybrauerversand.de/MattMill-Ruehrwerksantrieb

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Offline mabrungard

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Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« Reply #937 on: January 09, 2017, 12:22:47 AM »
I'm not about to say that pumping produces better results, it is just more practical.
Martin B
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Offline bboy9000

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Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« Reply #938 on: January 09, 2017, 02:31:49 AM »
Well pumping in the setup shown probably reduces O2 exposure.  I just can't afford that type of system.  I brew Denny-style for the most part.  I'll just recirculate gently.
Brian
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The Beerery

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Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« Reply #939 on: January 09, 2017, 05:47:31 PM »
A new blog post:

Trub seperation

Prost.

Offline denny

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Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« Reply #940 on: January 09, 2017, 05:53:46 PM »
Is it correct to assume that using a wort return tube requires a pump?

That is correct. In my opinion, pumping wort is a preferable method of 'mixing' your mash...move the wort and not the grain.

Could you elaborate Martin?  Why would it be better that way?
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The Beerery

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Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« Reply #941 on: January 09, 2017, 05:57:22 PM »
Is it correct to assume that using a wort return tube requires a pump?

That is correct. In my opinion, pumping wort is a preferable method of 'mixing' your mash...move the wort and not the grain.

Could you elaborate Martin?  Why would it be better that way?

Actually the last blog post talks of some of the reasons...

Offline bboy9000

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Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« Reply #942 on: January 09, 2017, 10:22:52 PM »
Is it correct to assume that using a wort return tube requires a pump?

That is correct. In my opinion, pumping wort is a preferable method of 'mixing' your mash...move the wort and not the grain.

Could you elaborate Martin?  Why would it be better that way?
The only reason I can think of is the ability to run it thought a mash cap for LODO brewing. 
Brian
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Big Monk

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Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« Reply #943 on: January 09, 2017, 11:13:58 PM »
A major reason would be forming a nice filter bed which can be used to filter out undesirable material from the mash from getting into the Boil.

A new blog post:

Trub seperation

Prost.
« Last Edit: January 09, 2017, 11:17:58 PM by Big Monk »

Online ynotbrusum

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Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« Reply #944 on: January 10, 2017, 02:29:55 AM »
Nice blog post on trub separation.  I wonder where hot break skimming and use of a filter screen or falsebottom in the boil kettle would fall in terms of the degree of benefits to retaining less trub.
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