Author Topic: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing  (Read 80914 times)

The Beerery

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Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« Reply #165 on: October 26, 2016, 10:45:43 PM »
Are yeast nutrients allowed in the low do process? Some have zinc in them, so would that cause a problem?

You can use nutrients. Zinc will be consumed(actually is needed) by the yeast.. But great question!

Offline brewinhard

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Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« Reply #166 on: October 26, 2016, 10:48:59 PM »
Are yeast nutrients allowed in the low do process? Some have zinc in them, so would that cause a problem?

You can use nutrients. Zinc will be consumed(actually is needed) by the yeast.. But great question!

Thanks, i figured in such trace amounts that a healthy fermentation would make it negligible. Good to know.

Big Monk

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Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« Reply #167 on: October 26, 2016, 10:57:57 PM »
Are yeast nutrients allowed in the low do process? Some have zinc in them, so would that cause a problem?

You can use nutrients. Zinc will be consumed(actually is needed) by the yeast.. But great question!

Thanks, i figured in such trace amounts that a healthy fermentation would make it negligible. Good to know.

You can also promote zinc retention in the mash tun. I'd have to scan Kunze for the relevant pages but it's in there.

The Beerery

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Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« Reply #168 on: October 26, 2016, 11:08:01 PM »
Are yeast nutrients allowed in the low do process? Some have zinc in them, so would that cause a problem?

You can use nutrients. Zinc will be consumed(actually is needed) by the yeast.. But great question!

Thanks, i figured in such trace amounts that a healthy fermentation would make it negligible. Good to know.

You can also promote zinc retention in the mash tun. I'd have to scan Kunze for the relevant pages but it's in there.

Sauergut!

Big Monk

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Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« Reply #169 on: October 26, 2016, 11:20:16 PM »
Are yeast nutrients allowed in the low do process? Some have zinc in them, so would that cause a problem?

You can use nutrients. Zinc will be consumed(actually is needed) by the yeast.. But great question!

Thanks, i figured in such trace amounts that a healthy fermentation would make it negligible. Good to know.

You can also promote zinc retention in the mash tun. I'd have to scan Kunze for the relevant pages but it's in there.

Sauergut!


Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« Reply #170 on: October 27, 2016, 03:33:52 AM »
When I lauter into the kettle I raise pH to around 5.5pH,
You can raise pH in the kettle a variety of ways, use whatever is the easiest for you.

For example?

Addition of top up water, or a small amount of baking soda or chalk.
Pickling lime? That would be my choice. Any problems with that?

I wouldn't mess with pickling lime in a pale beer.  You could easily sparge with RO and raise the pH in the kettle if you're so inclined.
Just a little would do it, and Ca and OH will be flavor neutral. Baking soda adds more Na.
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The Beerery

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Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« Reply #171 on: October 27, 2016, 01:11:02 PM »
A boiling  water top of RO in the kettle would be probably your lowest DO, and easiest raise of pH with out any hardness. For my batch size (6.5 gallons) 1 gallon does this wonderfully.

Offline narcout

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Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« Reply #172 on: October 27, 2016, 04:13:52 PM »
I'm planning a low oxygen brew for my next batch (hoping to brew it next weekend).

I'm thinking I can follow the paper pretty well with the following exceptions:

- I'm brewing a Belgian ale so the fermentation schedule will be different
- My understanding from reading the GBF is that you want to use less than 100 mg/l of SMB for ales so I was   
  thinking maybe I would start at 50 mg/l
-Given my schedule, it's extremely likely I will miss the window for spunding so I'll have to add some 
 priming solution in the keg

I think I have everything else covered (condition grain, pre-boil strike water,fill mash tun from bottom, minimal stirring/splashing, no sparge, 60 minute boil targeting 10% evaporation, stainless chiller, etc.).

Any comments or suggestions?

Is it recommended to skip the vorlauf when not utilizing a recirculating mash system?

I really don't know what to expect in terms of the efficiency hit.  I'm usually in the low 80's for this beer, but with no sparge, no stirring to break up any dough balls, shorter boil, and conditioned grain (which I think will result in a coarser crush), I designed the recipe to target 70%.
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Offline dilluh98

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Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« Reply #173 on: October 27, 2016, 04:39:22 PM »
I really don't know what to expect in terms of the efficiency hit.  I'm usually in the low 80's for this beer, but with no sparge, no stirring to break up any dough balls, shorter boil, and conditioned grain (which I think will result in a coarser crush), I designed the recipe to target 70%.

This is my concern going at this for the first time, too. I crush fine, bag in a cooler, batch sparge and typically get about 85% mash efficiency. First go at it I think I'm going to keep everything the same except preboil, 50 ppm SMB, no sparge (single infusion temp for ale), minimal/no stir. I'm guessing this will put me  at ~70% ME.

Big Monk

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Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« Reply #174 on: October 27, 2016, 04:49:34 PM »
I really don't know what to expect in terms of the efficiency hit.  I'm usually in the low 80's for this beer, but with no sparge, no stirring to break up any dough balls, shorter boil, and conditioned grain (which I think will result in a coarser crush), I designed the recipe to target 70%.

This is my concern going at this for the first time, too. I crush fine, bag in a cooler, batch sparge and typically get about 85% mash efficiency. First go at it I think I'm going to keep everything the same except preboil, 50 ppm SMB, no sparge (single infusion temp for ale), minimal/no stir. I'm guessing this will put me  at ~70% ME.

Keep in mind that you can get very high efficiency with no sparge. If your crush and pH management are on point and you can limit mash losses (deadspace) there is no reason that with 100% conversion you can be in the mid 80s.

As an example, Bryan bottom fills/drains his kettles so MLT deadspace is little to none. That couple with continuous recirculating translates to high no sparge mash η.

The Beerery

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Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« Reply #175 on: October 27, 2016, 04:54:04 PM »
Yea, sorry I can't speak to losses of eff%. I am no sparge and am at 100% conversion, 90% mash, and 85% brewhouse.

Big Monk

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Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« Reply #176 on: October 27, 2016, 05:11:58 PM »
Something as simple as installing a pickup tube and using a bag could serve to limit your deadspace greatly

Offline narcout

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Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« Reply #177 on: October 27, 2016, 05:38:36 PM »
I bet the constant recirculating is pretty helpful.  I'll see where I come out and report back. 

I do have a pump and could set up a recirculating system, but everytime I have seriously considered it, I've decided not to.
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Big Monk

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Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« Reply #178 on: October 27, 2016, 06:46:17 PM »
I bet the constant recirculating is pretty helpful.  I'll see where I come out and report back. 

I do have a pump and could set up a recirculating system, but everytime I have seriously considered it, I've decided not to.

Be sure to reduce your flow rate and return under the liquid line so as to reduce any splashing.

Offline ajk

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Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« Reply #179 on: October 28, 2016, 02:21:31 AM »
This might help with your efficiency adjustment, in case you haven't seen it.