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Author Topic: Low Oxygen Brewing Sheet  (Read 13981 times)

Big Monk

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Re: Low Oxygen Brewing Sheet
« Reply #15 on: October 23, 2016, 12:01:39 pm »
Question - I downloaded a prior GBF reference spreadsheet a few weeks ago that was SMB additions only for mash and sparge. Are those numbers fairly accurate, and if so, the new software is just more comprehensive and user friendly? Or are those numbers not as reliable?


I wrote the interface that Matt used for his tabular form SMB spreadsheet on the GBF.

I would use this new one over any other. It accounts for color and pH as well.

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Low Oxygen Brewing Sheet
« Reply #16 on: October 23, 2016, 12:06:55 pm »
Question - I downloaded a prior GBF reference spreadsheet a few weeks ago that was SMB additions only for mash and sparge. Are those numbers fairly accurate, and if so, the new software is just more comprehensive and user friendly? Or are those numbers not as reliable?


I wrote the interface that Matt used for his tabular form SMB spreadsheet on the GBF.

I would use this new one over any other. It accounts for color and pH as well.


Ok thanks. I'll download the software soon for the extra features, I was just curious if the additions were fairly accurate on the other one.
Jon H.

Big Monk

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Re: Low Oxygen Brewing Sheet
« Reply #17 on: October 23, 2016, 12:47:51 pm »
Yup. I put it together for those who want some key information to supplement their existing software before they try the full sheet.

Big Monk

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Low Oxygen Brewing Sheet
« Reply #18 on: October 23, 2016, 07:02:44 pm »
Another thing I may try to incorporate into the smaller sheet is an infusion step mash calculator for those using coolers.

Big Monk

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Low Oxygen Brewing Sheet
« Reply #19 on: October 24, 2016, 05:58:05 am »
As promised:



Files is updated and currently in the folder.
« Last Edit: October 24, 2016, 06:01:52 am by Big Monk »

Offline homoeccentricus

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Re: Low Oxygen Brewing Sheet
« Reply #20 on: October 24, 2016, 09:18:49 am »
I'm confused by the way the amount of strike water is calculated/needs to be input. In Beersmith I just add the batch size (amount of water into the fermenter - something else is confusing to me) and the amount of strike water comes out automatically. How should this be done in your spreadsheet? Say the batch volume (water into fermenter or whatever) is 10 (liter or, if you really must, duh, gallon). Sparge and no-sparge if you would be so kind.
Frank P.

Staggering on the shoulders of giant dwarfs.

Big Monk

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Low Oxygen Brewing Sheet
« Reply #21 on: October 24, 2016, 10:36:38 am »
Strike water is calculated from grain weight and WTG.

The sheet only supports no sparge so you have to play with grain weight and WTG to balance things out and ensure Packaged volume is adequate.

To be clear: are you talking about the full sheet or the smaller reference sheet?
« Last Edit: October 24, 2016, 10:38:14 am by Big Monk »

Offline homoeccentricus

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Re: Low Oxygen Brewing Sheet
« Reply #22 on: October 24, 2016, 10:39:56 am »
Full sheet.
Frank P.

Staggering on the shoulders of giant dwarfs.

Big Monk

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Re: Low Oxygen Brewing Sheet
« Reply #23 on: October 24, 2016, 10:40:39 am »
Full sheet.

So my previous explanation stands.

Offline homoeccentricus

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Re: Low Oxygen Brewing Sheet
« Reply #24 on: October 24, 2016, 10:44:22 am »
How do I then calculate WTG Ratio for no-sparge? Isn't that what a spreadsheet is supposed to tell me? :)
Frank P.

Staggering on the shoulders of giant dwarfs.

Big Monk

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Re: Low Oxygen Brewing Sheet
« Reply #25 on: October 24, 2016, 10:46:07 am »
WTG is a user input. Grain weight is also a user input.

There is a bit of a dance here. Especially when you get into higher efficiencies like Bryan has. You have to adjust both values in order to get the desired strike volume.

Offline homoeccentricus

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Re: Low Oxygen Brewing Sheet
« Reply #26 on: October 24, 2016, 12:28:56 pm »
I thought I was going crazy. I kept on changing the batch size value, but saw nothing change. Still don't understand what it does.
Frank P.

Staggering on the shoulders of giant dwarfs.

Big Monk

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Re: Low Oxygen Brewing Sheet
« Reply #27 on: October 24, 2016, 12:41:22 pm »
Without going through its entire purpose in detail, it is used for tracking and for other calculations. It does not affect strike volumes or the other volumes calculated off of strike. Set it and forget it.

Offline homoeccentricus

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Re: Low Oxygen Brewing Sheet
« Reply #28 on: October 24, 2016, 01:12:57 pm »
Set it and forget it.

I will try. But this is one of those things that keeps me awake at night.  :(
Frank P.

Staggering on the shoulders of giant dwarfs.

Big Monk

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Re: Low Oxygen Brewing Sheet
« Reply #29 on: October 24, 2016, 01:48:48 pm »
Set it and forget it.

I will try. But this is one of those things that keeps me awake at night.  :(

Well, as the thought of people losing sleep over the spreadsheet troubles me, here you go:

The reason I have a batch volume cell is to decouple the other calculated volumes from certain loss calculations. Shrinkage loss in particular. I used to get a circular reference warning when calculating shrinkage loss based on the Fermentor Volume. This messed up other calcs. Kettle trub loss was one of them.

In order to decouple these calculated loss values from the Fermentor volume, I created a rather benign cell called batch volume. I use it as reference in the summary page as well as a volume input for kettle trub loss and shrinkage loss.

So, at the end of the day, just set it and forget it and sleep comfortable knowing the sheet, and the world, is better off that it exists.