Author Topic: bottle conditioning with corn sugar.  (Read 970 times)

Offline curtdogg

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bottle conditioning with corn sugar.
« on: October 24, 2016, 01:44:52 AM »
My wort has been in controlled fermentation temps the entire time. At what temp is best to bottle condition / carbonate?

I've always done room temp. before this. Will they carbonate well in the same temp. (67-69f)?

Thanks

Curtis


Offline santoch

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Re: bottle conditioning with corn sugar.
« Reply #1 on: October 24, 2016, 02:25:10 AM »
That will be fine.  I like it a little warmer (70F), but there's really not much difference.
The biggest issue I've seen is when folks leave them on the basement floor.  The concrete will suck the heat right out of them and they never carbonate that way.
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Offline curtdogg

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Re: bottle conditioning with corn sugar.
« Reply #2 on: October 24, 2016, 10:18:01 PM »
Thanks for the info.

For aging purposes what would be the best temp? I'm trying to keep some until Thanksgiving and maybe Xmas.

R,
Curtis

Offline santoch

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Re: bottle conditioning with corn sugar.
« Reply #3 on: October 25, 2016, 01:25:15 AM »
Thanksgiving and Christmas are relatively soon.  Most wouldn't consider that "aging", but rather "conditioning" time.  Aging is typically 6 months or longer.

You can carb them for 2-4 weeks warm.  Once you are satisfied that they are all carbonated, it's a "cooler is better" thing.  They will keep best if you chill them down to 50F or lower.  You can throw them in the fridge and they will be great.  But, if you just keep them in the 60's or lower, they'll be ok, too.  What you really want to avoid is getting them hot.  Try to keep them below the 70's for sure.

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Offline curtdogg

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Re: bottle conditioning with corn sugar.
« Reply #4 on: October 25, 2016, 06:11:18 PM »
Thanks a lot for the info.

 Now bottle conditioning: Maple Brown Ale, Maple Brown Ale with Coffee.
 
What would work good with an Oatmeal Stout in secondary besides coffee that won't effect my FG too much?

Cinnamon sticks, Vanilla Beans, Cocoa Nibs?



Offline smkranz

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Re: bottle conditioning with corn sugar.
« Reply #5 on: October 26, 2016, 02:56:19 AM »
Thanks a lot for the info.

 Now bottle conditioning: Maple Brown Ale, Maple Brown Ale with Coffee.
 
What would work good with an Oatmeal Stout in secondary besides coffee that won't effect my FG too much?

Cinnamon sticks, Vanilla Beans, Cocoa Nibs?

I just bottled a dark Belgian quad which I tried to pattern after Lost Abbey's Track #8.  (Recipe is shared on BeerSmith cloud for anyone who might be interested in searching.)  For my 5.5 gallon half of this batch, I added 3 sticks of Saigon cinnamon, and about a dozen dried Japones peppers, broken in half, in a secondary. 

Been brewing for over 20 years, and this is the first time for me using cinnamon sticks, let alone Saigon cinnamon.  They were very aromatic going in, but I didn't think 3 sticks would be too many.  After just 24 hours, I tasted the beer, and pulled the cinnamon out, it was already fairly prominent, but not over-powering.  I left the peppers in for 3 or 4 more days.  Amazing flavor.
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Offline curtdogg

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Re: bottle conditioning with corn sugar.
« Reply #6 on: October 26, 2016, 05:02:05 PM »
Great idea sir thank you. I shall contemplate my ingredients.
I do 3 gallon batches so I usually sacrifice 1 gal for additions / dry hopping etc.

I forgot to mention that this is the first time I used Black Patten malt in a brew.
I'm sort of left with a campfire ash / roasty / smoke flavor finish. its not unpleasant, fades fast and doesn't coat the tongue. Cinnamon could add some depth and character, where the chilis could add to the smoky flavor.

I'm definitely going for it.

Thanks

R, Curtis