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Author Topic: Na levels in brewing...  (Read 8360 times)

Offline Silver_Is_Money

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Re: Na levels in brewing...
« Reply #30 on: March 14, 2020, 03:59:52 pm »

Challenge accepted!   ;D


Some other daily recommended dosage limits may also apply.   ;D

Offline Silver_Is_Money

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Re: Na levels in brewing...
« Reply #31 on: March 15, 2020, 05:35:42 am »
If the document I linked to earlier within this thread is on to something, then perhaps the flavor enhancing target ideals for sodium ions are 44 ppm for light colored beers, and 88 ppm for dark colored beers.

Offline Village Taphouse

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Re: Na levels in brewing...
« Reply #32 on: March 15, 2020, 08:29:47 am »
If the document I linked to earlier within this thread is on to something, then perhaps the flavor enhancing target ideals for sodium ions are 44 ppm for light colored beers, and 88 ppm for dark colored beers.
I see the section on page 328 where it states that for pale beers the kill zone is 75-150ppm... how did you arrive at the 44ppm?  I'm not questioning it, just curious about the number.  The 44ppm would be a little over three times the Na I have in my water currently.  Thanks & cheers.

Ps.  A little checking tells me I need about 2.4g of NaCl (kosher salt is what I would use) to get my source water from 13ppm to 44ppm. 
« Last Edit: March 15, 2020, 08:33:02 am by Village Taphouse »
Ken from Chicago. 
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Offline Silver_Is_Money

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Re: Na levels in brewing...
« Reply #33 on: March 15, 2020, 08:50:03 am »
I see the section on page 328 where it states that for pale beers the kill zone is 75-150ppm... how did you arrive at the 44ppm? 

MW NaCl = 58.4428
MW Na+ = 22.9898
MW Cl- = 35.4530

(75+150)/2 = 112.5  ppm of NaCl at midrange of ideal range

22.9898/58.4428 x 112.5 ppm NaCl = 44.25 ppm  Na+ (or sodium, which I rounded to 44 ppm)

Offline Village Taphouse

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Re: Na levels in brewing...
« Reply #34 on: March 15, 2020, 11:18:13 am »
Thanks for that.  The dicey part is the increase in chloride from the NaCl.  I typically add 2-3g of CaCl to my water for pale beers like this but adding 2.4g of NaCl might make it so I wouldn't have to add any CaCl.  I may try this on an upcoming batch but I would really dislike futzing up a perfectly good batch of beer if the experiment failed. 
Ken from Chicago. 
A day without beer is like... just kidding, I have no idea.

Offline Silver_Is_Money

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Re: Na levels in brewing...
« Reply #35 on: March 16, 2020, 03:59:53 am »
Thanks for that.  The dicey part is the increase in chloride from the NaCl.  I typically add 2-3g of CaCl to my water for pale beers like this but adding 2.4g of NaCl might make it so I wouldn't have to add any CaCl.  I may try this on an upcoming batch but I would really dislike futzing up a perfectly good batch of beer if the experiment failed.

Calcium is a beneficially required mineral. It often proves difficult to raise the sodium level, and sacrificing calcium in order to do so may not pan out.  Much depends upon how much calcium reduction you experience.

Offline Village Taphouse

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Re: Na levels in brewing...
« Reply #36 on: March 16, 2020, 07:50:31 am »
Thanks for that.  The dicey part is the increase in chloride from the NaCl.  I typically add 2-3g of CaCl to my water for pale beers like this but adding 2.4g of NaCl might make it so I wouldn't have to add any CaCl.  I may try this on an upcoming batch but I would really dislike futzing up a perfectly good batch of beer if the experiment failed.

Calcium is a beneficially required mineral. It often proves difficult to raise the sodium level, and sacrificing calcium in order to do so may not pan out.  Much depends upon how much calcium reduction you experience.
That's exactly what I was thinking.  My source water has 34ppm of Ca and it would stay right there if I added ZERO CaSO4 or CaCl and only NaCl.  I suppose I could add some CaCl and less NaCl but something tells me that at this low level there would be little-to-no difference. 
Ken from Chicago. 
A day without beer is like... just kidding, I have no idea.