Author Topic: How cold to cold crash?  (Read 900 times)

Offline Richard

  • Cellarman
  • **
  • Posts: 97
    • View Profile
How cold to cold crash?
« on: November 11, 2016, 05:41:15 AM »
I use an Irish moss/carageenan fining agent in the boil, and I use ClarityFerm to eliminate gluten during the fermentation. The latter is also supposed to eliminate chill haze. My homebuilt temperature control system (swamp cooler with thermoelectric chiller and PID loop) can only cool to about 45-50, so I usually cool my carboy down to 50 for 24-48 hours before bottling. That seems to give a very compact yeast cake and clear beer. Is there any advantage for me to go lower?

Offline 2brew559

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 264
    • View Profile
Re: How cold to cold crash?
« Reply #1 on: November 11, 2016, 05:52:30 AM »
Dude..  just lower the temp and crash that sh:::::t

Sent from my Nexus 6 using Tapatalk

JUST A REGULAR GUY WHO BREWS!
Aplaudir Amigos Y Amigas  :)

Offline 2brew559

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 264
    • View Profile
Re: How cold to cold crash?
« Reply #2 on: November 11, 2016, 05:53:06 AM »
Trust me I listen to the advice on this brd. they know what they are  talking about.  If they say crash.  Then crash away!



Sent from my Nexus 6 using Tapatalk
« Last Edit: November 14, 2016, 04:03:10 PM by 2brew559 »
JUST A REGULAR GUY WHO BREWS!
Aplaudir Amigos Y Amigas  :)

Offline Frankenbrew

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 669
  • South Shore Brew Club, SE Massachusetts
    • View Profile
Re: How cold to cold crash?
« Reply #3 on: November 11, 2016, 01:48:05 PM »
I use an Irish moss/carageenan fining agent in the boil, and I use ClarityFerm to eliminate gluten during the fermentation. The latter is also supposed to eliminate chill haze. My homebuilt temperature control system (swamp cooler with thermoelectric chiller and PID loop) can only cool to about 45-50, so I usually cool my carboy down to 50 for 24-48 hours before bottling. That seems to give a very compact yeast cake and clear beer. Is there any advantage for me to go lower?

Crash is the key word here. Take it down as close to zero F as you can.
Frank C.

And thereof comes the proverb: 'Blessing of your
heart, you brew good ale.'

Offline kramerog

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1810
    • View Profile
    • My LinkedIn page
Re: How cold to cold crash?
« Reply #4 on: November 11, 2016, 03:43:44 PM »
Since you bottle, I don't see the benefit of dropping the temperature lower than your current practice as you're going to end up with a deposit in your bottles anyway.

Offline denny

  • Administrator
  • Retired with too much time on my hands
  • *****
  • Posts: 19395
  • Noti OR [1991.4, 287.6deg] AR
    • View Profile
    • Dennybrew
Re: How cold to cold crash?
« Reply #5 on: November 11, 2016, 05:06:46 PM »
I use an Irish moss/carageenan fining agent in the boil, and I use ClarityFerm to eliminate gluten during the fermentation. The latter is also supposed to eliminate chill haze. My homebuilt temperature control system (swamp cooler with thermoelectric chiller and PID loop) can only cool to about 45-50, so I usually cool my carboy down to 50 for 24-48 hours before bottling. That seems to give a very compact yeast cake and clear beer. Is there any advantage for me to go lower?

Crash is the key word here. Take it down as close to zero F as you can.

Zero will freeze the beer, which won't be very helpful!  I shoot for 33.  The freezing point of an average gravity beer is around 29.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell

Offline Richard

  • Cellarman
  • **
  • Posts: 97
    • View Profile
Re: How cold to cold crash?
« Reply #6 on: November 11, 2016, 08:22:19 PM »
Thanks for all the replies. I was looking for more technical information on the consequences of cold crashing. I know it affects the clarity, but are there any other benefits?

Offline Hand of Dom

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 372
    • View Profile
Re: How cold to cold crash?
« Reply #7 on: November 12, 2016, 12:04:21 AM »
If you're getting clear beer with your current approach, I don't see any point in wasting energy trying to cool it further.
Dom

Currently drinking - Amarillo saison
Currently fermenting - Pale ale 1 - 2017

Offline charles1968

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 532
    • View Profile
Re: How cold to cold crash?
« Reply #8 on: November 12, 2016, 07:25:39 PM »
You can't get rid of chill haze at 50 F, even with Clarity Ferm. You need to chill the beer to below serving temperature (often domestic fridge temp) and then wait a week or two for the precipitated haze to drop out; then rack or package. Using gelatin while chilling speeds up the clearing process. If you serve beer warmer, chill haze might not be an issue. And some/most brewers don't mind a touch of haze anyway. It only bothers me when I give beer to friends.

Offline hopfenundmalz

  • Global Moderator
  • I must live here
  • *****
  • Posts: 8844
  • Milford, MI
    • View Profile
Re: How cold to cold crash?
« Reply #9 on: November 15, 2016, 02:54:23 PM »
I use an Irish moss/carageenan fining agent in the boil, and I use ClarityFerm to eliminate gluten during the fermentation. The latter is also supposed to eliminate chill haze. My homebuilt temperature control system (swamp cooler with thermoelectric chiller and PID loop) can only cool to about 45-50, so I usually cool my carboy down to 50 for 24-48 hours before bottling. That seems to give a very compact yeast cake and clear beer. Is there any advantage for me to go lower?

Crash is the key word here. Take it down as close to zero F as you can.

Zero will freeze the beer, which won't be very helpful!  I shoot for 33.  The freezing point of an average gravity beer is around 29.
Denny is right. To clear lagers quickly at the end of lagering, I go to -1C, or about 30F. Maybe Frankenbrew meant 0C?
Jeff Rankert
Ann Arbor Brewers Guild
AHA Governing Committee
BJCP National
Home-brewing, not just a hobby, it is a lifestyle!