Author Topic: W34/70 vs S-189  (Read 19976 times)

Offline theoman

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Re: W34/70 vs S-189
« Reply #45 on: November 24, 2016, 05:18:55 am »
I'm a big fan of 37/70, but I used s-189 for my last lager and I will definitely use it again. It might even become my go-to yeast for lagers. I pitched at around 9C and ramped up over 5 or 6 days to 18 (the temp in my cellar), went on vacation, kegged it when I got back and put it in the fridge for about 3 weeks at 6-ish, then tapped. It's possibly the best lager I've brewed and definitely had the most authentic Germanic lageriness of the lagers I've brewed.

Offline Iliff Ave

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Re: W34/70 vs S-189
« Reply #46 on: November 24, 2016, 09:17:24 am »
Thanks all. The goal of the thread was strictly to inquire about the differences between 34/70 and 189.

I have accepted that I am a lower tier of brewer because I don't employ LODO techniques or liquid yeast on most occasions. I get it...

Makes two of us, I have many good reasons TO use dry yeasts. Anyway, I'll be following this thread, it's been a good read already. I just used 34/70 for the first time with an Amber Lager. I have brewed this recipe many times using Wyeast Bohemian Lager (the "same" strain) so I am looking forward to how they compare. In the spring I plan on giving S-189 a try for a Bock, seems that will be very fitting for the yeast.

goschman, every try any Mangrove Jack yeasts? They really kicked up their selection. They have both Bohemian and Bavarian dry lager yeasts. I have used the Bohemian and a couple other of their yeasts.

I have not tried Mangrove Jack yet. I will have to give it a go. I mainly use fermentis unless I am brewing a kolsch as I tend to stick to American or German inspired beers. I do like their yeast for the most part if you stay away from some of the strains which don't seem to get the job done. I mainly stick with 05, K97, 34/70 and 04 every once in a while. I will use T58 if I want a mild Belgian character...

Other than the lager strains any other you recommend from MJ? I just derailed my own thread after complaining about it. Sorry...
« Last Edit: November 24, 2016, 09:22:26 am by goschman »
On Tap/Bottled: IPL, Adjunct Vienna, Golden Stout, Honey Lager
Fermenting: IPA
Up Next: mexi lager, Germerican pale ale

Offline Iliff Ave

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Re: W34/70 vs S-189
« Reply #47 on: November 24, 2016, 09:19:07 am »
I'm a big fan of 37/70, but I used s-189 for my last lager and I will definitely use it again. It might even become my go-to yeast for lagers. I pitched at around 9C and ramped up over 5 or 6 days to 18 (the temp in my cellar), went on vacation, kegged it when I got back and put it in the fridge for about 3 weeks at 6-ish, then tapped. It's possibly the best lager I've brewed and definitely had the most authentic Germanic lageriness of the lagers I've brewed.

What did you brew with the 189?
On Tap/Bottled: IPL, Adjunct Vienna, Golden Stout, Honey Lager
Fermenting: IPA
Up Next: mexi lager, Germerican pale ale

Offline Philbrew

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Re: W34/70 vs S-189
« Reply #48 on: November 24, 2016, 09:21:33 am »
Thanks all. The goal of the thread was strictly to inquire about the differences between 34/70 and 189.

I have accepted that I am a lower tier of brewer because I don't employ LODO techniques or liquid yeast on most occasions. I get it...

Makes two of us, I have many good reasons TO use dry yeasts. Anyway, I'll be following this thread, it's been a good read already. I just used 34/70 for the first time with an Amber Lager. I have brewed this recipe many times using Wyeast Bohemian Lager (the "same" strain) so I am looking forward to how they compare. In the spring I plan on giving S-189 a try for a Bock, seems that will be very fitting for the yeast.

goschman, every try any Mangrove Jack yeasts? They really kicked up their selection. They have both Bohemian and Bavarian dry lager yeasts. I have used the Bohemian and a couple other of their yeasts.
Makes three of us.  The 110 miles one way to the LHBS is enough reason for me.

Mangrove Jack's M79 Burton Union makes a tasty bitters.
Many of us would be on a strict liquid diet if it weren't for pretzels.

Offline denny

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Re: W34/70 vs S-189
« Reply #49 on: November 24, 2016, 09:52:26 am »
I have accepted that I am a lower tier of brewer because I don't employ LODO techniques or liquid yeast on most occasions. I get it...

That is just not true.  Homebrewing is not a contest...well, you know....
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: W34/70 vs S-189
« Reply #50 on: November 24, 2016, 11:30:47 am »
I have accepted that I am a lower tier of brewer because I don't employ LODO techniques or liquid yeast on most occasions. I get it...

That is just not true.  Homebrewing is not a contest...well, you know....


Yep, not a contest at all. Just a damn fun hobby.
Jon H.

Offline Steve Ruch

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Re: W34/70 vs S-189
« Reply #51 on: November 24, 2016, 03:11:23 pm »
In the spring I plan on giving S-189 a try for a Bock, seems that will be very fitting for the yeast.

I made a fantastic hellesbock with it.
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Offline theoman

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Re: W34/70 vs S-189
« Reply #52 on: November 25, 2016, 01:06:09 am »
I'm a big fan of 37/70, but I used s-189 for my last lager and I will definitely use it again. It might even become my go-to yeast for lagers. I pitched at around 9C and ramped up over 5 or 6 days to 18 (the temp in my cellar), went on vacation, kegged it when I got back and put it in the fridge for about 3 weeks at 6-ish, then tapped. It's possibly the best lager I've brewed and definitely had the most authentic Germanic lageriness of the lagers I've brewed.

What did you brew with the 189?

Pretty basic, hop-forward German-ish lager. Pils, Vienna, some flaked barley and a bit of carapils. Lots of hops, mostly Saaz. If you want more specifics, I can dig up the recipe.

The Beerery

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Re: W34/70 vs S-189
« Reply #53 on: November 25, 2016, 08:37:00 am »
As with most things in life the 80/20 rule also applies here. Some people are happy where they are and some strive for more. For some this is a hobby, and some this is an obsession.

Offline bayareabrewer

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Re: W34/70 vs S-189
« Reply #54 on: November 25, 2016, 10:40:47 am »
I would switch to your lodo principles in a heartbeat if there was measurable imperial evidence that it produced superior beer. From what I see, there isn't. There are two men on the internet telling everyone who will listen about how great it is, and plugging their website at every opportunity. And comments like the one above are condescending absolutions. Sorry man, but talking down to people like that and implying people that don't adhere to your brewing technique are not striving for better beer is just rude.

Offline bboy9000

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Re: W34/70 vs S-189
« Reply #55 on: November 25, 2016, 11:09:08 am »
In my two lodo attempts so far, I've used dry yeasts in a SNS starter to get the yeast going strong and the cell count up.  Thoughts?
Maybe I misunderstood but you don't need to do a starter with dry yeasts as the the process was done for you in the lab.
Brian
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Offline bboy9000

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Re: W34/70 vs S-189
« Reply #56 on: November 25, 2016, 11:12:39 am »
While the dry do start out life as the liquid strain equivalents, they don't really exhibit the same properties.
Actually the dry yeasts don't start out as the liquid equivalent and neither do the different brands of liquid yeasts.  They are often different isolates of the same strain which explains why they have slightly different characteristics.  Man I miss having Mark on the forum.
Brian
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The Beerery

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Re: W34/70 vs S-189
« Reply #57 on: November 25, 2016, 11:16:31 am »
While the dry do start out life as the liquid strain equivalents, they don't really exhibit the same properties.
Actually the dry yeasts don't start out as the liquid equivalent and neither do the different brands of liquid yeasts.  They are often different isolates of the same strain which explains why they have slightly different characteristics.  Man I miss having Mark on the forum.

So 34/70 isn't based off of 34/70, nor is 830, or 2124?

The Beerery

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Re: W34/70 vs S-189
« Reply #58 on: November 25, 2016, 11:21:15 am »
I would switch to your lodo principles in a heartbeat if there was measurable imperial evidence that it produced superior beer. From what I see, there isn't. There are two men on the internet telling everyone who will listen about how great it is, and plugging their website at every opportunity. And comments like the one above are condescending absolutions. Sorry man, but talking down to people like that and implying people that don't adhere to your brewing technique are not striving for better beer is just rude.

Thank you


LOL- Pot meet kettle!

Many of your very own are seeing quite nice results...

Anywho-I was simply trying to say to each their own.

The Beerery

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Re: W34/70 vs S-189
« Reply #59 on: November 25, 2016, 11:25:27 am »
In my two lodo attempts so far, I've used dry yeasts in a SNS starter to get the yeast going strong and the cell count up.  Thoughts?
Maybe I misunderstood but you don't need to do a starter with dry yeasts as the the process was done for you in the lab.

You can certainly do a starter to up your pitch count, obviously forgoing all the benefits of the dry. Those packs are quite expensive now-a-days so it may have been cheaper to propagate.