Author Topic: Wort Aeration  (Read 2740 times)

Offline deadpoetic0077

  • Assistant Brewer
  • ***
  • Posts: 209
  • Noobie
    • View Profile
Wort Aeration
« on: November 22, 2016, 07:28:33 PM »
When pitching yeast, I have always shaken my carboy to get some oxygen into the wort. I have read about people putting pure oxygen into the wort with aeration stones and O2 canisters since shaking the wort isn't all that great at dissolving anything into the wort.

I read in Denny's book that he uses a gas whip and a power drill to aearate the wort.

Anyone have good experience with this? How long should I whip it to incorporate a decent amount of O2?


Offline Phil_M

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1706
  • Southern Maryland
    • View Profile
Re: Wort Aeration
« Reply #1 on: November 22, 2016, 07:36:08 PM »
FWIW, I've never had bad results with just rocking the carboy back and forth vigorously for two minutes. It it a pain though, and doesn't work with all fermentors.

For my planned open fermentation experiments I'm thinking of using a mix-stir like you mention. I'll probably just do a minute or two at the start of fermentation, then another minute after the first barm has been skimmed.
Corn is a fine adjunct in beer.

And don't buy stale beer.

Offline HoosierBrew

  • Global Moderator
  • I must live here
  • *****
  • Posts: 13030
  • Indianapolis,IN
    • View Profile
Re: Wort Aeration
« Reply #2 on: November 22, 2016, 07:39:16 PM »
I read in Denny's book that he uses a gas whip and a power drill to aearate the wort.

Anyone have good experience with this? How long should I whip it to incorporate a decent amount of O2?



I use a mix stir - I mix until the foam is at the top of the bucket. Same principle for carboys.
Jon H.

Offline deadpoetic0077

  • Assistant Brewer
  • ***
  • Posts: 209
  • Noobie
    • View Profile
Re: Wort Aeration
« Reply #3 on: November 22, 2016, 07:44:14 PM »
OK yea that looks like it would work the same way as what I have would.

Thanks guys, I appreciate it! Should be much easier than rocking a carboy! And a bit safer too!

Offline deadpoetic0077

  • Assistant Brewer
  • ***
  • Posts: 209
  • Noobie
    • View Profile
Re: Wort Aeration
« Reply #4 on: November 22, 2016, 07:50:17 PM »
FWIW, I've never had bad results with just rocking the carboy back and forth vigorously for two minutes. It it a pain though, and doesn't work with all fermentors.

For my planned open fermentation experiments I'm thinking of using a mix-stir like you mention. I'll probably just do a minute or two at the start of fermentation, then another minute after the first barm has been skimmed.

what is a barm?

Offline denny

  • Administrator
  • Retired with too much time on my hands
  • *****
  • Posts: 19942
  • Noti OR [1991.4, 287.6deg] AR
    • View Profile
    • Dennybrew
Re: Wort Aeration
« Reply #5 on: November 22, 2016, 08:10:57 PM »
That system worked excellently for me.  now that I pump from kettle to fermenter I find that does all the aeration I need and do nothing else.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell

Offline The Beerery

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1556
    • View Profile
Re: Wort Aeration
« Reply #6 on: November 22, 2016, 08:34:06 PM »
We ran tests on simply shaking and splashing wort. We found with staking the everlivin out of the keg, we saw 2-3ppm DO. Which may be fine when using dry yeast, or making moderate gravity ales, but certainly isn't enough for lagers, and high gravity ales.

Offline stevecrawshaw

  • Cellarman
  • **
  • Posts: 55
    • View Profile
    • My Recipes
Re: Wort Aeration
« Reply #7 on: November 22, 2016, 08:55:07 PM »
I "no chill" into a HDPE jerrycan leaving about 1/4 of the volume as headspace. Once chilled I add yeast and fill the headspace with O2 and then shake the hell out of it. When active fermentation starts I repeat this process after I have vented the CO2 by a brief shake.
Its a similar idea to the shaken not stirred starter. Create a lot of foam, large surface area in contact with pure O2 to absorb high levels of oxygen. Have used this approach on a range of beers with good healthy fermentations.
cheers
steve
I like to keep a bottle of stimulant handy in case I see a snake, which I also keep handy.

Offline deadpoetic0077

  • Assistant Brewer
  • ***
  • Posts: 209
  • Noobie
    • View Profile
Re: Wort Aeration
« Reply #8 on: November 22, 2016, 08:59:08 PM »
That system worked excellently for me.  now that I pump from kettle to fermenter I find that does all the aeration I need and do nothing else.

Was hoping to  hear directly from you! :P How long did you aerate for? Just till foam gets to the top of bucket/ fermentor? Did you do it before or after you pitched your yeast?

Offline deadpoetic0077

  • Assistant Brewer
  • ***
  • Posts: 209
  • Noobie
    • View Profile
Re: Wort Aeration
« Reply #9 on: November 22, 2016, 09:01:47 PM »
We ran tests on simply shaking and splashing wort. We found with staking the everlivin out of the keg, we saw 2-3ppm DO. Which may be fine when using dry yeast, or making moderate gravity ales, but certainly isn't enough for lagers, and high gravity ales.

I think I heard about that from Beersmith brewing podcast with John palmer as the guest.

He said gets to around 2-3 as well, but ideally you want at least 8ppm for all beers right?

Offline bboy9000

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 703
  • KCMO
    • View Profile
Re: Wort Aeration
« Reply #10 on: November 22, 2016, 09:04:29 PM »
This paper says shaking is an effective aeration method.  Obviously there is a problem in the experiment but not sure it would matter.
http://www.brewangels.com/Beerformation/AerationMethods.pdf
Brian
mobrewer

Offline Rhoobarb

  • Assistant Brewer
  • ***
  • Posts: 200
    • View Profile
Re: Wort Aeration
« Reply #11 on: November 22, 2016, 09:07:13 PM »
I say whip it.
Whip it good.
For a minute or until you get it foamy.
I used to use a wine degasser and a drill to whip it. Whip it good.
Now, I use an aeration stone.
"Brewing beer to save money makes as much sense as buying a boat to cut costs on a fish dinner." -- Tim French

>^,,^<
Rhoobarb
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Chicken-City-Ale-Raisers/118689024850197

Offline Philbrew

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 867
    • View Profile
Re: Wort Aeration
« Reply #12 on: November 22, 2016, 09:08:02 PM »
That system worked excellently for me.  now that I pump from kettle to fermenter I find that does all the aeration I need and do nothing else.
+1   I can chill to fermentation temps in the kettle so I add the yeast to the kettle and pump into the top of a 6.5 gal. BMB fermenter.  By the time it's up to the 5.5 gal. mark, there is foam coming out the top.
Many of us would be on a strict liquid diet if it weren't for pretzels.

Offline pete b

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 3123
  • Barre, Ma
    • View Profile
Re: Wort Aeration
« Reply #13 on: November 22, 2016, 09:15:08 PM »
I use a mix stir with a stainless shaft in my plastic fermenter. If I were using the ss mix stir in a carboy I would put the rod in the hole of a stopper and keep the little plastic tube at the end on to prevent a bad accident.
Don't let the bastards cheer you up.

Offline Hand of Dom

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 372
    • View Profile
Re: Wort Aeration
« Reply #14 on: November 22, 2016, 11:21:22 PM »
FWIW, I've never had bad results with just rocking the carboy back and forth vigorously for two minutes. It it a pain though, and doesn't work with all fermentors.

For my planned open fermentation experiments I'm thinking of using a mix-stir like you mention. I'll probably just do a minute or two at the start of fermentation, then another minute after the first barm has been skimmed.

what is a barm?

Where I live, a barm is a round bread roll. 
Dom

Currently drinking - Amarillo saison
Currently fermenting - Pale ale 1 - 2017