Author Topic: British Blonde - dry yeast recommendation  (Read 2803 times)

Offline JJeffers09

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Re: British Blonde - dry yeast recommendation
« Reply #15 on: November 30, 2016, 05:54:23 PM »
I agree, palisade is great, 1.056OG?

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Offline Iliff Ave Brewhouse

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Re: British Blonde - dry yeast recommendation
« Reply #16 on: November 30, 2016, 05:57:02 PM »
I agree, palisade is great, 1.056OG?

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Right now I have it at 1.052 but am a bit caught up due to unknown attenuation. I am looking for something probably 5-5.5% ABV
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Offline chumley

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Re: British Blonde - dry yeast recommendation
« Reply #17 on: November 30, 2016, 06:10:44 PM »
For a dry English yeast, I like Munton's Gold.

Offline brewinhard

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Re: British Blonde - dry yeast recommendation
« Reply #18 on: November 30, 2016, 07:28:13 PM »
For a dry English yeast, I like Munton's Gold.

What ferment temp do you run on that do get good esters in the final product?

Offline stpug

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Re: British Blonde - dry yeast recommendation
« Reply #19 on: November 30, 2016, 11:53:48 PM »
Of the three contenders you mention, I've only used MJ Burton Union and Lallemand London ESB.  I feel that both are well suited to give you some apparent yeast character without being heavy-handed.

I find the London ESB to be the more mellow of the two, and the one that's more in-line with the typical British ester profiles we experience and read about.  It ferments VERY fast. It cannot ferment maltotriose (mash accordingly; i.e. very low for long time, or step mash).  It's fairly powdery and doesn't drop bright very quickly (or without help), but if you're okay with a hazy beer for most of the keg then no worries.  It's a great, reliable, easy-going yeast strain that I plan on using many more times.  This would be a great strain for the lighter-side British ales where it's light-handed presence can still play a subtle role.  Attenuation is from about 62-72% (65% typical) depending on mash schedule and grist composition.  This strain would do well with recipes calling for invert sugars and/or simple sugars to bring up the attenuation percentage.

MJ Burton Union is more of an outlier - but NOT in a bad way.  It's yeast characters are unique, easily identifiable, and a great addition to several beer styles.  The characters I get from this strain are less fruity and more earthy and woody (not woodsy).  Most of MJ's earlier offerings (2013) had considerable lag (using rehydrated yeast/slurry); in the 12-18 hour range.  This strain dropped clear pretty well; not powdery.  Typical mashes (152-154F) all achieved 74-77% apparent attenuation.  This strain would stand out in a lighter-style beer as a "key player", and play a bit more of a "backup" role in a richer, darker-style beer.  Of the several British yeast strains I've used, this one is one of the most memorable and unique (in a good way).

Hope this helps!
« Last Edit: November 30, 2016, 11:56:33 PM by stpug »

Offline Iliff Ave Brewhouse

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Re: British Blonde - dry yeast recommendation
« Reply #20 on: December 01, 2016, 12:51:39 AM »
Of the three contenders you mention, I've only used MJ Burton Union and Lallemand London ESB.  I feel that both are well suited to give you some apparent yeast character without being heavy-handed.

I find the London ESB to be the more mellow of the two, and the one that's more in-line with the typical British ester profiles we experience and read about.  It ferments VERY fast. It cannot ferment maltotriose (mash accordingly; i.e. very low for long time, or step mash).  It's fairly powdery and doesn't drop bright very quickly (or without help), but if you're okay with a hazy beer for most of the keg then no worries.  It's a great, reliable, easy-going yeast strain that I plan on using many more times.  This would be a great strain for the lighter-side British ales where it's light-handed presence can still play a subtle role.  Attenuation is from about 62-72% (65% typical) depending on mash schedule and grist composition.  This strain would do well with recipes calling for invert sugars and/or simple sugars to bring up the attenuation percentage.

MJ Burton Union is more of an outlier - but NOT in a bad way.  It's yeast characters are unique, easily identifiable, and a great addition to several beer styles.  The characters I get from this strain are less fruity and more earthy and woody (not woodsy).  Most of MJ's earlier offerings (2013) had considerable lag (using rehydrated yeast/slurry); in the 12-18 hour range.  This strain dropped clear pretty well; not powdery.  Typical mashes (152-154F) all achieved 74-77% apparent attenuation.  This strain would stand out in a lighter-style beer as a "key player", and play a bit more of a "backup" role in a richer, darker-style beer.  Of the several British yeast strains I've used, this one is one of the most memorable and unique (in a good way).

Hope this helps!

Very helpful! What is a good, easily sourced simple sugar that would work well in British styles? Is cane sugar no good?
On Tap/Bottled: Wheat, Citrus IPA, Festbier, New School Pale

Fermenting: chocolate pumpkin porter
Up Next: hoppy amber lager, IPA

Offline tommymorris

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British Blonde - dry yeast recommendation
« Reply #21 on: December 01, 2016, 01:59:38 AM »
I did a split batch of a Blonde Ale with US05 and Windsor once. The Windsor beer was terrible.  The esters the Windsor puts off don't go well with a blonde ale IMHO. The beer had an odd wang to it. Not the best description, I know.

I have used MJ Burton Ale in a bitter once and it was pretty nice. I thought the esters were more reserved with this yeast which might fit better in a Golden Ale.

PS. You might wonder why a split batch with those yeasts. Everyone on here was taking split batches at the time and those were the only two yeasts I had on hand. :)

Offline bboy9000

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British Blonde - dry yeast recommendation
« Reply #22 on: December 01, 2016, 02:36:58 AM »
Wyeast 1275 is the equivalent to WLP023.  Wy1318 is Boddington's and White Labs doesn't have an equivalent AFAIK.

I love Wyeast 1469.  Nutty at first the mild stone fruit after it sits a week in the keg.  It's the Timothy Taylor yeast.

OP- I know you want dry yeast but if you have access to liquid and are doing a relatively low gravity beer then grab some.  Unfortunately I don't have much experience with dry yeast other than US-05 and S-04.

This is a good reference for comparing Wyeast and White Labs strains:
http://www.mrmalty.com/yeast.htm
« Last Edit: December 01, 2016, 03:24:20 AM by bboy9000 »
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Offline Iliff Ave Brewhouse

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Re: British Blonde - dry yeast recommendation
« Reply #23 on: December 01, 2016, 03:52:58 AM »
I did a split batch of a Blonde Ale with US05 and Windsor once. The Windsor beer was terrible.  The esters the Windsor puts off don't go well with a blonde ale IMHO. The beer had an odd wang to it. Not the best description, I know.

I have used MJ Burton Ale in a bitter once and it was pretty nice. I thought the esters were more reserved with this yeast which might fit better in a Golden Ale.

PS. You might wonder why a split batch with those yeasts. Everyone on here was taking split batches at the time and those were the only two yeasts I had on hand. :)

I don't know if it will be this batch but I need to try Windsor. Seems like a love/hate type of yeast so I want to find out what side I am on.
On Tap/Bottled: Wheat, Citrus IPA, Festbier, New School Pale

Fermenting: chocolate pumpkin porter
Up Next: hoppy amber lager, IPA

Offline Iliff Ave Brewhouse

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Re: British Blonde - dry yeast recommendation
« Reply #24 on: December 01, 2016, 03:54:40 AM »
Wyeast 1275 is the equivalent to WLP023.  Wy1318 is Boddington's and White Labs doesn't have an equivalent AFAIK.

I love Wyeast 1469.  Nutty at first the mild stone fruit after it sits a week in the keg.  It's the Timothy Taylor yeast.

OP- I know you want dry yeast but if you have access to liquid and are doing a relatively low gravity beer then grab some.  Unfortunately I don't have much experience with dry yeast other than US-05 and S-04.

This is a good reference for comparing Wyeast and White Labs strains:
http://www.mrmalty.com/yeast.htm

I may go with liquid. 1318 is sounding pretty good. So many options it's difficult...
On Tap/Bottled: Wheat, Citrus IPA, Festbier, New School Pale

Fermenting: chocolate pumpkin porter
Up Next: hoppy amber lager, IPA

Offline stpug

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Re: British Blonde - dry yeast recommendation
« Reply #25 on: December 01, 2016, 03:20:57 PM »
Of the three contenders you mention, I've only used MJ Burton Union and Lallemand London ESB.  I feel that both are well suited to give you some apparent yeast character without being heavy-handed.

I find the London ESB to be the more mellow of the two, and the one that's more in-line with the typical British ester profiles we experience and read about.  It ferments VERY fast. It cannot ferment maltotriose (mash accordingly; i.e. very low for long time, or step mash).  It's fairly powdery and doesn't drop bright very quickly (or without help), but if you're okay with a hazy beer for most of the keg then no worries.  It's a great, reliable, easy-going yeast strain that I plan on using many more times.  This would be a great strain for the lighter-side British ales where it's light-handed presence can still play a subtle role.  Attenuation is from about 62-72% (65% typical) depending on mash schedule and grist composition.  This strain would do well with recipes calling for invert sugars and/or simple sugars to bring up the attenuation percentage.

MJ Burton Union is more of an outlier - but NOT in a bad way.  It's yeast characters are unique, easily identifiable, and a great addition to several beer styles.  The characters I get from this strain are less fruity and more earthy and woody (not woodsy).  Most of MJ's earlier offerings (2013) had considerable lag (using rehydrated yeast/slurry); in the 12-18 hour range.  This strain dropped clear pretty well; not powdery.  Typical mashes (152-154F) all achieved 74-77% apparent attenuation.  This strain would stand out in a lighter-style beer as a "key player", and play a bit more of a "backup" role in a richer, darker-style beer.  Of the several British yeast strains I've used, this one is one of the most memorable and unique (in a good way).

Hope this helps!

Very helpful! What is a good, easily sourced simple sugar that would work well in British styles? Is cane sugar no good?

I've done the homemade invert method a couple times with great success.  Invert #1 would be ideal for a light colored british ale and is fairly quick to make (30 minutes maybe).  I've used 14oz Invert#1 in a best bitter with excellent results.  If you have some turbinado sugar, lactic acid, and thermometer then you've got what you need (I skip the corn syrup).

This is the method I've used a few times:
http://www.unholymess.com/blog/beer-brewing-info/making-brewers-invert

Basically the process is mix water, sugar, acid and bring to a boil.  Get the mixture to 240F.  Once there, reduce stove heat as low as you can go to maintain the 235-245 range. Simmer/cook 20 minutes (no stirring needed). Cool, pour in a jar, and you're done.  I don't think it technically needs to be refrigerated due to the high viscosity and sugar content of the syrup, but I've always kept mine in the fridge.

Once it's refrigerated it becomes very hard.  If you want it more syrupy and less solid then you can add some amount of water at the end of the boil to thin it out a little bit, but be careful of the spitting and popping when mixing (i.e. use a long spoon and stand back a bit).

If you end up making some, make double what you plan to use because it saves you some time the next time you want to use some (and you WILL want to use it again in another batch ;) ).
« Last Edit: December 01, 2016, 03:24:17 PM by stpug »

Offline chumley

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Re: British Blonde - dry yeast recommendation
« Reply #26 on: December 01, 2016, 04:13:36 PM »
For a dry English yeast, I like Munton's Gold.

What ferment temp do you run on that do get good esters in the final product?

66° - 68°F.  I find Munton's Goild to be the dry yeast that most closely resembles Fuller's yeast (WY1968), in giving a nice full mouthfeel and a little fruity esters.

Offline Ellismr

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Re: British Blonde - dry yeast recommendation
« Reply #27 on: December 20, 2016, 02:35:58 PM »
I use WLP002


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Offline Saccharomyces

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Re: British Blonde - dry yeast recommendation
« Reply #28 on: December 23, 2016, 07:11:11 AM »
If you want to use a dry strain, my suggestion would be BRY 97 (a.k.a. Ballantine Ale).  It is of British origin.  I used it one summer for my British blondes.  It is more attenuative than the maltotriose-challenged strains, but less attenutative than Nottingham and US-05. This strain should be fermented at 68F.

Offline Iliff Ave Brewhouse

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Re: British Blonde - dry yeast recommendation
« Reply #29 on: December 24, 2016, 04:26:58 AM »
If you want to use a dry strain, my suggestion would be BRY 97 (a.k.a. Ballantine Ale).  It is of British origin.  I used it one summer for my British blondes.  It is more attenuative than the maltotriose-challenged strains, but less attenutative than Nottingham and US-05. This strain should be fermented at 68F.

Thank you. I have been wanting to try that strain. I thought it was the same as wy1272 but maybe I am confusing it with something else.
On Tap/Bottled: Wheat, Citrus IPA, Festbier, New School Pale

Fermenting: chocolate pumpkin porter
Up Next: hoppy amber lager, IPA