Author Topic: decoction mashing / home brewing myths  (Read 3685 times)

The Beerery

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Re: decoction mashing / home brewing myths
« Reply #30 on: December 08, 2016, 02:38:22 PM »
Does anyone else besides me just enjoy the process of doing a decoction mash? I'm planning a Dunkel brew day of some sort soon...should be fun outside on a wintry day.

Before I knew what I know now. I built an automated Decoction vessel, that I could add in addition to my 3 vessel. I called it a MDU(mobile decoction unit). Automated induction plate, with an automated stirrer(copper even!). It was glorious. Now it just sits in the corner giving me the stink eye.








Offline JJeffers09

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Re: decoction mashing / home brewing myths
« Reply #31 on: December 08, 2016, 02:40:22 PM »
I am particular about the style that benefits from it.  Your 'standard' brews do not need it or benefit from it.  I enjoy a decoction brew day.  That is generally when I geek out with friends and have a few brewing assistants.  So it's more of the memory of making the beer than it is a quest of making better beer.

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Offline bjanat

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Re: decoction mashing / home brewing myths
« Reply #32 on: December 08, 2016, 02:43:01 PM »
Have you tried to sell it? And do you think a low oxygen process could be followed if you mash separately if you do a single decoction and pour it all into the regular mash tun?

Maybe if I could afford it, I'd buy one of these, and do something similar. https://www.google.no/amp/www.wsj.com/amp/articles/testing-do-it-all-kitchen-appliances-that-chop-blend-stir-and-cook-1464894620?client=safari


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The Beerery

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Re: decoction mashing / home brewing myths
« Reply #33 on: December 08, 2016, 02:51:43 PM »
Have you tried to sell it? And do you think a low oxygen process could be followed if you mash separately if you do a single decoction and pour it all into the regular mash tun?


No, I have not. I will keep it, who knows when another project will present itself!

I could not get the levels of DO, I can with my infusion process. The scale really hurts us here.

Offline denny

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Re: decoction mashing / home brewing myths
« Reply #34 on: December 08, 2016, 05:10:29 PM »
what about the taste of a decocted beer did you not like Denny?

It wasn't that I didn't like the decocted beers (and there were a lot of tasters besides me), it's that the tasters didn't prefer the decocted beers.  In effect, there was no reason to do a decoction of people didn't prefer the beers made with it.
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Offline denny

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Re: decoction mashing / home brewing myths
« Reply #35 on: December 08, 2016, 05:12:19 PM »
Very good article. Few things smell better than a boiling decoction mash.
This got me though, laugh out loud. "With an infusion mash (a most extreme case being the Anglo-American single infusion mash), specialty malts are often the only option for increasing a beer’s complexity. Just look at the high percentage of caramel malts included in so many single infusion mashing recipes…"
 ;D

This is kind of a rhetorical question, but so what?  What's wrong with using caramel malts to get the flavor profile you want?  Why should this guy dictate how everybody else should brew?
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The Beerery

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Re: decoction mashing / home brewing myths
« Reply #36 on: December 08, 2016, 05:20:08 PM »
Very good article. Few things smell better than a boiling decoction mash.
This got me though, laugh out loud. "With an infusion mash (a most extreme case being the Anglo-American single infusion mash), specialty malts are often the only option for increasing a beer’s complexity. Just look at the high percentage of caramel malts included in so many single infusion mashing recipes…"
 ;D

This is kind of a rhetorical question, but so what?  What's wrong with using caramel malts to get the flavor profile you want?  Why should this guy dictate how everybody else should brew?

I didn't write nor publish the article.. Ask him!

I simply laughed at the wording of the snippet I posted. I myself use Infusion mashing (Albeit not Anglo-American single infusion mash.. HAHA that gets me) and caramalts to achieve flavor profiles.

« Last Edit: December 08, 2016, 05:21:52 PM by The Beerery »

Offline bayareabrewer

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Re: decoction mashing / home brewing myths
« Reply #37 on: December 08, 2016, 05:23:20 PM »
I'm now going to refer to myself as a anglo American brewer.

Offline denny

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Re: decoction mashing / home brewing myths
« Reply #38 on: December 08, 2016, 05:28:07 PM »

I didn't write nor publish the article.. Ask him!

I simply laughed at the wording of the snippet I posted. I myself use Infusion mashing (Albeit not Anglo-American single infusion mash.. HAHA that gets me) and caramalts to achieve flavor profiles.

Yeah, I realize that...that's why I said it was a rhetorical question!  Sorry I didn't make it clearer.
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Offline reverseapachemaster

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Re: decoction mashing / home brewing myths
« Reply #39 on: December 08, 2016, 05:51:08 PM »
Does anyone else besides me just enjoy the process of doing a decoction mash? I'm planning a Dunkel brew day of some sort soon...should be fun outside on a wintry day.

If you enjoy a decoction mash you might love a turbid mash.

Hours (literally) of fun.
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Offline brewinhard

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Re: decoction mashing / home brewing myths
« Reply #40 on: December 09, 2016, 07:47:47 PM »
Does anyone else besides me just enjoy the process of doing a decoction mash? I'm planning a Dunkel brew day of some sort soon...should be fun outside on a wintry day.

If you enjoy a decoction mash you might love a turbid mash.

Hours (literally) of fun.

Oh yeah, that is some true fun!

Offline duelerx

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Re: decoction mashing / home brewing myths
« Reply #41 on: December 12, 2016, 04:35:37 PM »
The guys at Brulosophy just posted their experiment using triple decoction vs single infusion:

http://brulosophy.com/2016/12/12/mash-methods-pt-3-decoction-vs-single-infusion-exbeeriment-results/

Offline dmtaylor

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Re: decoction mashing / home brewing myths
« Reply #42 on: December 12, 2016, 05:18:58 PM »
Fantastic!  Their results mirror my own for a similar experiment I ran a couple of months ago.  I've not yet published the results, which are very confusing to say the least... if memory serves, about 13 out of 17 people were able to taste a difference in my two marzens.  I was blindly able to figure it out 2 out of 2 times.  I literally even blindfolded myself to avoid any difference due to appearance, as like Brulosophy's, my single infusion beer was more hazy than the decocted.  They did taste different, albeit slightly so and NOT for the reasons you might expect -- no melanoidin or burnt flavors.  Just different.
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Offline denny

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Re: decoction mashing / home brewing myths
« Reply #43 on: December 12, 2016, 05:59:53 PM »
The guys at Brulosophy just posted their experiment using triple decoction vs single infusion:

http://brulosophy.com/2016/12/12/mash-methods-pt-3-decoction-vs-single-infusion-exbeeriment-results/

I have been saying this since 2008.  Good to know they agree.  http://www.ahaconference.org/wp-content/uploads/presentations/2008/DennyConn.pdf
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Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: decoction mashing / home brewing myths
« Reply #44 on: December 13, 2016, 03:31:02 AM »
I spent some time in Germany again this summer. Some breweries don't decoct their Helles and Pilsners. I will name one as Ayinger, that does not decoct the Helles and light colored beers, but does decoct the wheat and dark beers. A little place in Niederbayern decocts their Sunkel, which is almost all that they make.

Pilsner Urquell decocts. They malt their own grain. They use copper mash tuns and boil kettles. They put in a new brewhouse around 1999, and insisted on copper to make the beer taste the same.

It might be a good thing if the Brülosophy folks decoct A Hefeweizen or a Dunkel.
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