Author Topic: Dry yeast for Belgian ales. Comments please  (Read 2949 times)

Offline Philbrew

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Dry yeast for Belgian ales. Comments please
« on: December 13, 2016, 07:28:34 PM »
Since the LHBS is a 220 mile round trip, I tend to like to use dry yeasts.  I've brewed several tasty saisons with Lallemand Belle Saison.  I want to try some other Belgian styles and need your input on dry Belgian yeasts.
Here's a list of yeasts (in no particular order) that I've seen online:

- Lallemand Abbaye

- Mangrove Jack's M31 Belgian Tripel

- Mangrove Jack's M21 Belgian Wit

- Mangrove Jack's M41 Belgian Ale

- Mangrove Jack's M47 Belgian Abbey

- Mangrove Jack's M27 Belgian Ale

- Fermentis Safbrew BG-256 Ale (formerly Abbeye)

- Others that I missed?

- Fermentis Safbrew T-58 (added)

Your comments greatly appreciated.
« Last Edit: December 13, 2016, 09:41:53 PM by Philbrew »
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Offline narcout

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Re: Dry yeast for Belgian ales. Comments please
« Reply #1 on: December 13, 2016, 07:31:38 PM »
- Fermentis Safbrew BG-256 Ale (formerly Abbeye)

There's a long thread on this one here: https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=20190.75

I just finished a keg of Belgian Pale that I brewed with it.  The beer turned out pretty well, and it definitely rounded out after a few extra weeks of cold conditioning, but I personally won't use it again.
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Re: Dry yeast for Belgian ales. Comments please
« Reply #2 on: December 13, 2016, 07:52:58 PM »
One you didn't list, which is the only one I've used, is Safbrew T-58.  Pretty decent yeast for more phenolic styles.
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Offline gman23

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Re: Dry yeast for Belgian ales. Comments please
« Reply #3 on: December 13, 2016, 09:00:45 PM »
My only experience is with Belle Saison which I love and T58. I like T58 but it produces a very mild Belgian character in my opinion. May have something to do with the fact that I usually ferment in the mid 60s.
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Offline BrewBama

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Dry yeast for Belgian ales. Comments please
« Reply #4 on: December 14, 2016, 02:45:02 PM »
I've used Fermentis Abbeye in a Belgian Amber which I thoroughly enjoyed.


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Offline brewcrew7

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Re: Dry yeast for Belgian ales. Comments please
« Reply #5 on: December 14, 2016, 04:29:50 PM »
- Fermentis Safbrew BG-256 Ale (formerly Abbeye)

There's a long thread on this one here: https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=20190.75

I just finished a keg of Belgian Pale that I brewed with it.  The beer turned out pretty well, and it definitely rounded out after a few extra weeks of cold conditioning, but I personally won't use it again.

You are not using it again because there are better options that offer different qualities or that this yeast lacked some character you were expecting?

Offline narcout

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Re: Dry yeast for Belgian ales. Comments please
« Reply #6 on: December 14, 2016, 07:32:45 PM »
- Fermentis Safbrew BG-256 Ale (formerly Abbeye)

There's a long thread on this one here: https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=20190.75

I just finished a keg of Belgian Pale that I brewed with it.  The beer turned out pretty well, and it definitely rounded out after a few extra weeks of cold conditioning, but I personally won't use it again.

You are not using it again because there are better options that offer different qualities or that this yeast lacked some character you were expecting?

I think the beer I brewed with it comes out better with one of the liquid options. 

The yeast also threw a lot of sulphur during fermentation which took a while to dissipate.


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Offline Joe Sr.

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Re: Dry yeast for Belgian ales. Comments please
« Reply #7 on: December 14, 2016, 09:40:25 PM »
I've used T-58 and thought it made a decent saison.  At most, I've probably used it twice.  Not because I didn't like it though but because I typically have a slurry of 3711 in the fridge.
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Offline bierview

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Re: Dry yeast for Belgian ales. Comments please
« Reply #8 on: December 19, 2016, 09:40:31 AM »
Since the LHBS is a 220 mile round trip, I tend to like to use dry yeasts.  I've brewed several tasty saisons with Lallemand Belle Saison.  I want to try some other Belgian styles and need your input on dry Belgian yeasts.
Here's a list of yeasts (in no particular order) that I've seen online:

- Lallemand Abbaye

- Mangrove Jack's M31 Belgian Tripel

- Mangrove Jack's M21 Belgian Wit

- Mangrove Jack's M41 Belgian Ale

- Mangrove Jack's M47 Belgian Abbey

- Mangrove Jack's M27 Belgian Ale

- Fermentis Safbrew BG-256 Ale (formerly Abbeye)

- Others that I missed?

- Fermentis Safbrew T-58 (added)

Your comments greatly appreciated.

Belle Saison makes a nice dry Belgian while T-58 is more fruity.  IMHO