Author Topic: Bread  (Read 2992 times)

Offline erockrph

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Bread
« on: December 17, 2016, 08:10:04 PM »
I finally got a bread machine after years of wanting to get one. As much as I'd like to do everything by hand, time is a big barrier for me, so I'm starting with a machine for now.

I've gotten my feet wet with a few recipes that came with the machine, and now I'm ready to start branching out. I'm kind of at the point like a kit brewer who is ready to start making a few tweaks to some proven recipes as a step to eventually designing my own recipes.

I know there are several bread makers here. Any good references, forums, recipe sites you use for reliable information and recipes?
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Offline JJeffers09

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Re: Bread
« Reply #1 on: December 17, 2016, 08:16:57 PM »
King arthur flour is the flour/website I frequent for my homemade pastries and bread

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Offline denny

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Re: Bread
« Reply #2 on: December 17, 2016, 08:40:39 PM »
King arthur flour is the flour/website I frequent for my homemade pastries and bread

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Offline The Beerery

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Bread
« Reply #3 on: December 17, 2016, 08:40:50 PM »
King Arthur is great they will have everything you need as far as ingredients, recipes and process. However if you want to get crazy, mill your own flour. Oxidation in flour is the same as malt/brewing, so it's hard to beat fresh. I make a lot of bread, just finished the weekly family sandwich bread and am going to slice and package it now.


Edit:
All done





Wood fired ovens are fun to play with as well for pizza and bread.
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« Last Edit: December 17, 2016, 08:55:59 PM by The Beerery »
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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Bread
« Reply #4 on: December 17, 2016, 09:03:49 PM »
Bread looks terrific!
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Offline pete b

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Re: Bread
« Reply #5 on: December 17, 2016, 09:10:48 PM »
I've never used a bread machine so I want to make sure my understanding is correct: basically you add all the ingredients and it, mixes, kneads, proofs and bakes without being touched again?
First of all any home baked bread beats the hell out of store bought and I have tasted really good bread made in a machine.
I would recommend the book I tested in the podcast thread I posted here, Bread Illustrated by America's Test Kitchen  as well as Peter Reinhart's Bread Baker's Apprentice. The reason is that both books explain the theory and practicalities behind the procedures. Even though the recipes are not formulated for machines you strike me as the type of person capable of adapting the recipes when given the science behind the recipes.
The most important thing about making good bread is the same as making good beer: manipulating the timing  and temperature of fermentation. I assume that sometimes you would like to get some fermented flavor in the bread. Since my impression is that the machine kind of goes ahead and makes the bread pretty quickly I would look into using pre ferments as a portion of your recipe. You can find recipes that use bigas or pate fermente (relatively dry, maybe 60% hydration, doughs that are allowed to ferment for a day or more) and sponges (wet pre ferments) as well as sourdough starters. All of these will go a long way in making your bread more tasty and also easier to digest. I try to keep a batch of my favorite pizza dough recipe portioned out in my freezer. I can thaw a piece out , cut it into pieces and use it as pate fermente.
I also wonder if it's possible to remove the dough before it bakes. Simply putting it in the fridge overnight will add fermented flavor.

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Offline MDixon

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Re: Bread
« Reply #6 on: December 18, 2016, 05:45:02 PM »
I have a bread machine and would suggest if you have a particular machine to make sure you know the order the ingredients must be added for optimal results. Mine is dry then wet. I rarely to never make bread anymore, but found the machine took a bit of trial and error to get optimal results. With mine it was important to remove the bread as soon as it finished baking. Good luck with your new machine.
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Offline riceral

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Re: Bread
« Reply #7 on: December 18, 2016, 05:47:54 PM »
In addition to what has been said, I have found Breadtopia   http://breadtopia.com  is a good resource.
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Offline BrewBama

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Re: Bread
« Reply #8 on: December 18, 2016, 09:23:56 PM »
Great looking bread Beerery


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Offline erockrph

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Re: Bread
« Reply #9 on: December 19, 2016, 04:29:48 PM »
I've never used a bread machine so I want to make sure my understanding is correct: basically you add all the ingredients and it, mixes, kneads, proofs and bakes without being touched again?
First of all any home baked bread beats the hell out of store bought and I have tasted really good bread made in a machine.
I would recommend the book I tested in the podcast thread I posted here, Bread Illustrated by America's Test Kitchen  as well as Peter Reinhart's Bread Baker's Apprentice. The reason is that both books explain the theory and practicalities behind the procedures. Even though the recipes are not formulated for machines you strike me as the type of person capable of adapting the recipes when given the science behind the recipes.
The most important thing about making good bread is the same as making good beer: manipulating the timing  and temperature of fermentation. I assume that sometimes you would like to get some fermented flavor in the bread. Since my impression is that the machine kind of goes ahead and makes the bread pretty quickly I would look into using pre ferments as a portion of your recipe. You can find recipes that use bigas or pate fermente (relatively dry, maybe 60% hydration, doughs that are allowed to ferment for a day or more) and sponges (wet pre ferments) as well as sourdough starters. All of these will go a long way in making your bread more tasty and also easier to digest. I try to keep a batch of my favorite pizza dough recipe portioned out in my freezer. I can thaw a piece out , cut it into pieces and use it as pate fermente.
I also wonder if it's possible to remove the dough before it bakes. Simply putting it in the fridge overnight will add fermented flavor.

You pretty much have it right-on with how a bread machine works. You simply add the ingredients in the correct order for that particular machine (mine is wet first, the dry, then yeast added to a pocket in the dry ingredients), and the machine handles the mixing, proofing, kneading and baking from there. There is also an alarm that goes off at the time where you'd add in nuts, fruit, chocolate chips, etc. My machine has 8 different bread settings (plus 2 for dough), 3 different loaf sizes, and 3 different crust darkness settings. So while a lot of the steps are out of your control, you do have a little room for customization.

Thanks for the tips. I'll have to look into those books. You're right that I'm more interested in the "whys" rather than simply the "hows". Much like beer, I want the tools to be able to design and adapt my own recipes for my process, so I can get my ideas from my brain into a finished loaf.

And, aside from the dough settings, the machine can be opened at any point (i.e., to add extra water or flour in the kneading process if the dough is looking to wet/dry), so I can remove the dough at any stage in the process if I want. A baguette pan is probably my next purchase, so I can make smaller loaves, and ones shaped like something other than a large cube.
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Offline Slowbrew

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Re: Bread
« Reply #10 on: December 19, 2016, 04:40:41 PM »
I have number of friends who use their bread machines to mix the dough and do the first proof and then take the dough out to kneed and shape into loaves.  The second proof is done in the loaf pan and baked in an oven.

They were tired of the cube bread too.  8^)

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Offline MDixon

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Re: Bread
« Reply #11 on: December 19, 2016, 07:50:33 PM »
I've done pretzels and something else which escapes me that way. The machine was great for it except my machine is on the small side.
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Offline erockrph

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Re: Bread
« Reply #12 on: December 21, 2016, 02:28:08 AM »
I'm really liking that when you're working on a recipe you can turn around a new batch in hours instead of weeks like beer would take.

Here's "Kitchen Sink Multigrain v2". Version 1 was a brick. Version 2 is already really tasty, and I've learned a lot from hands-on experience in just a couple of days.



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Offline jimmykx250

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Re: Bread
« Reply #13 on: December 21, 2016, 09:44:50 AM »
FWIW i have made some pretty nice loafs doing the no knead method as well. Granted they are not sandwich loafs but tasty just the same. Nothing like warm home made bread.
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Offline reverseapachemaster

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Re: Bread
« Reply #14 on: December 21, 2016, 03:39:33 PM »
King Arthur is great they will have everything you need as far as ingredients, recipes and process. However if you want to get crazy, mill your own flour. Oxidation in flour is the same as malt/brewing, so it's hard to beat fresh. I make a lot of bread, just finished the weekly family sandwich bread and am going to slice and package it now.

How much SMB in the dough?  8)
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