Author Topic: Excerpts from DeClerck's "A Textbook of Brewing"  (Read 3268 times)

Big Monk

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Excerpts from DeClerck's "A Textbook of Brewing"
« on: December 29, 2016, 04:01:09 PM »
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« Last Edit: January 01, 2017, 05:48:46 AM by Big Monk »

Offline klickitat jim

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Re: Excerpts from DeClerck's "A Textbook of Brewing"
« Reply #1 on: December 30, 2016, 01:39:56 AM »
That I can buy. Transferring to secondary is one of the biggest misunderstood beginner instructions mistakes out there. Whenever I read "after X days, transfer to secondary" I quit reading that recipe because God knows what else kind of nonsense will follow.

Offline klickitat jim

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Re: Excerpts from DeClerck's "A Textbook of Brewing"
« Reply #2 on: December 30, 2016, 01:56:21 AM »
That I can buy. Transferring to secondary is one of the biggest misunderstood beginner instructions mistakes out there. Whenever I read "after X days, transfer to secondary" I quit reading that recipe because God knows what else kind of nonsense will follow.

It makes much more sense to consider the transfer and spunding as "secondary" fermentation.

What is generally thought of as "secondary" fermentation is really conditioning.


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I get it. I'm talking about the ubiquitous beginning brewer instructions that tell them to rack to secondary. Most are being told they should do that to avoid autolysis. If your yeast are so frail they die and rupture after 7 days you've got bigger problems. The typical first time brewer would be better off letting their imperial Russian white stout with cocoa nibs, juniper berries, and baby onions, finish fermentation rather than prematurely taking it away from most of its yeast cake.

I agree with using the term secondary fermentation when adding a second fermentable, like fruit. Or when adding a second yeast, like Bret. Or like in this case, natural carbonation.

Offline Phil_M

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Re: Excerpts from DeClerck's "A Textbook of Brewing"
« Reply #3 on: December 30, 2016, 02:27:55 AM »
That I can buy. Transferring to secondary is one of the biggest misunderstood beginner instructions mistakes out there. Whenever I read "after X days, transfer to secondary" I quit reading that recipe because God knows what else kind of nonsense will follow.

It makes much more sense to consider the transfer and spunding as "secondary" fermentation.

What is generally thought of as "secondary" fermentation is really conditioning.


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This is exactly what I've been advocating. By all means, DO transfer to secondary and perform a secondary fermentation - in the FINAL vessel, be it bottle, keg, or cask.
Corn is a fine adjunct in beer.

And don't buy stale beer.

Offline klickitat jim

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Re: Excerpts from DeClerck's "A Textbook of Brewing"
« Reply #4 on: December 30, 2016, 02:37:20 AM »
Great approach Phil, but not just on some arbitrary calendar date, right?

Offline JT

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Re: Excerpts from DeClerck's "A Textbook of Brewing"
« Reply #5 on: December 30, 2016, 02:38:54 AM »
Very cool gift - thanks for sharing!

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Offline Phil_M

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Re: Excerpts from DeClerck's "A Textbook of Brewing"
« Reply #6 on: December 30, 2016, 02:41:50 AM »
Great approach Phil, but not just on some arbitrary calendar date, right?

Agreed. I watched my last batch like a hawk, and racked to cask when the gravity was 4 points above the FFT (I still find this acronym odd) results. Even with 0.5 gallons of headspace in the cask, and rolling it around on the kitchen floor for 5 minutes, turned out great. Oxidation should happen after the cask is vented, not before.  ;)

But still, secondary isn't evil, it's just not leveraging it's intended purpose thats evil.
Corn is a fine adjunct in beer.

And don't buy stale beer.

Offline Phil_M

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Re: Excerpts from DeClerck's "A Textbook of Brewing"
« Reply #7 on: December 30, 2016, 03:28:35 AM »
Great approach Phil, but not just on some arbitrary calendar date, right?

Agreed. I watched my last batch like a hawk, and racked to cask when the gravity was 4 points above the FFT (I still find this acronym odd) results. Even with 0.5 gallons of headspace in the cask, and rolling it around on the kitchen floor for 5 minutes, turned out great. Oxidation should happen after the cask is vented, not before.  ;)

But still, secondary isn't evil, it's just not leveraging it's intended purpose thats evil.

Right. Enter bottle spunding!

Soon...
Corn is a fine adjunct in beer.

And don't buy stale beer.

Offline ynotbrusum

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Re: Excerpts from DeClerck's "A Textbook of Brewing"
« Reply #8 on: December 30, 2016, 06:22:51 PM »
That last excerpt is particularly insightful about bias and carry forward of "known" beer flavors - and applies to us all.  I try to avoid this bias when judging in competitions, while still applying the guidelines; one never overcomes it completely, I fear.

I knew a wine connoisseur who told me that "in the end [he felt that] there are just two kinds of wine - those you like and those you don't.  Significantly, you shouldn't prejudge them by the category in which they are placed by the winemaker or sommelier - your palate alone should be your guide."
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Offline bjanat

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Re: Excerpts from DeClerck's "A Textbook of Brewing"
« Reply #9 on: December 30, 2016, 07:03:55 PM »
This explains how the awful combination of caramel malts and grapefruit hops got to be so commonly accepted.


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Offline denny

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Re: Excerpts from DeClerck's "A Textbook of Brewing"
« Reply #10 on: December 30, 2016, 08:09:10 PM »
This explains how the awful combination of caramel malts and grapefruit hops got to be so commonly accepted.


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Awful to you, maybe, but delightful to me.
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Offline denny

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Re: Excerpts from DeClerck's "A Textbook of Brewing"
« Reply #11 on: December 30, 2016, 08:09:50 PM »
That last excerpt is particularly insightful about bias and carry forward of "known" beer flavors - and applies to us all.  I try to avoid this bias when judging in competitions, while still applying the guidelines; one never overcomes it completely, I fear.

I knew a wine connoisseur who told me that "in the end [he felt that] there are just two kinds of wine - those you like and those you don't.  Significantly, you shouldn't prejudge them by the category in which they are placed by the winemaker or sommelier - your palate alone should be your guide."

I do entire seminars about those very things.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell

Offline denny

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Re: Excerpts from DeClerck's "A Textbook of Brewing"
« Reply #12 on: December 31, 2016, 06:20:53 PM »
It's cool that you're posting all this, but are you sure there are no copyright issues?
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Offline denny

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Re: Excerpts from DeClerck's "A Textbook of Brewing"
« Reply #13 on: December 31, 2016, 07:00:40 PM »
It's cool that you're posting all this, but are you sure there are no copyright issues?

The only people currently selling this material is Siebel. Whether they have the copyright or not is something I'm not aware of but the original publisher has let this set go out of print of I'm not mistaken.

I believe Fair Use applies here but I'll be sure to try and limit full page excerpts on the future. I'll keep it to pertinent snippets of less than a paragraph.

That would be great.  Thanks.
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Offline Stevie

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Re: Excerpts from DeClerck's "A Textbook of Brewing"
« Reply #14 on: December 31, 2016, 07:16:36 PM »
70 years after authors death. It doesn't matter if the text is in print or not.

Even if the text itself was out of copyright, the printed text could be. For example, many literary classics are in the public domain, Frankenstein, Dracula, Sherlock Holmes, etc. The text is public domain, but that doesn't mean I can photocopy an edition I bought from Barnes and Noble. That edition likely carries its own copyright.

You may be protected under fair use, but I wouldn't push it.