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Noobie racking to secondary question

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david58:
I have a batch of Amber ale fermenting since Sunday (its now Wednesday evening)  - activity has slowed down quite a bit.  OG was about 1.044.

Do I expect fermentation to be tapering off this soon?

Is it possible to rack to the secondary too soon?

I am anxious to rack to the secondary, as I'd like to get one more batch started this weekend.  I will be traveling for a couple of weeks, and would love to think I could get an ipa cooked this weekend and racked to the secondary next.  Is that realistic?

richardt:
Check the specific gravity with the hydrometer and tell us what you got.

euge:
Yes current gravity! Was the OG 1.044 or was that a reading? Are you sure you read it correctly? ;)

Don't know what yeast or temp they're fermenting at.

But to answer your two questions: no, it's unusual but not unknown- the second is yes for a variety of reasons but not usually a disaster. A stalled fermentation could occur if your yeast strain has that tendency to drop out of suspension due to a downwards thermal shock. Rouse your yeast if they've stalled and then make sure they're at about 68F.

Good luck.

majorvices:
You will need to take a second hydrometer reading to be sure the beer is finished. Visual confirmation is not a good idea, especially if you are bottling.

Also, personally, I see no need to secondary a 1.044 amber ale. Just leave it in the primary an extra week or two then package as normal.

theDarkSide:

--- Quote from: majorvices on July 15, 2010, 04:55:42 AM ---Also, personally, I see no need to secondary a 1.044 amber ale. Just leave it in the primary an extra week or two then package as normal.

--- End quote ---
I agree with this unless your primary is larger than your secondary fermenter. ( 6 gallon carboy vs 5 gallon carboy, etc ).  If they are both the same, I wouldn't secondary.

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