Author Topic: Hazy Helles  (Read 573 times)

Offline ram5ey

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Hazy Helles
« on: January 19, 2017, 12:40:57 AM »
I'm just wondering if anyone would know the answer to this. I brewed a (mock) Helles with WLP029 and it has a haze that just wont go away despite time, temp, and gelatin. I have two theories:

1- I was using some 2 or three month old yeast from an overbuilt starter. I've heard that the first mutation is usually flocculation related.

2-I mistakenly added a tablespoon of CaCl to the mash instead of a Teaspoon. I know calcium in correct quantities aides in flocculation but would it be a detriment at too high of quantities?

My other beers are all usually brilliantly clear in a short amount of time. just wondering if anyone had any ideas. Thanks!
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Offline kramerog

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Re: Hazy Helles
« Reply #1 on: January 19, 2017, 12:56:19 AM »
Some experimentation on NE IPAs indicates that chlorides at 100+ ppm prevents some yeast from dropping out.  It is unclear what yeast strains are affected.   

Offline The Beerery

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Re: Hazy Helles
« Reply #2 on: January 19, 2017, 01:01:42 AM »
Admittedly have only brewed a few kolschs I am far from the authority on them but isnt kolsch yeast notoriously powdery?
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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Hazy Helles
« Reply #3 on: January 19, 2017, 01:05:11 AM »
Yeah, I'd be curious to see what strain. 2565 is the most powdery strain I've ever seen (damn mear needs filtration to clear sometimes), but 029 drops pretty quickly.
 
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Offline The Beerery

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Re: Hazy Helles
« Reply #4 on: January 19, 2017, 01:06:38 AM »
Yeah, I'd be curious to see what strain. 2565 is the most powdery strain I've ever seen (damn mear needs filtration to clear sometimes), but 029 drops pretty quickly.

He states 029 in the first post.  My kolschs were with 029 but they were probably 7-8 years ago so I can't remember.
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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Hazy Helles
« Reply #5 on: January 19, 2017, 01:08:45 AM »
Yeah, I'd be curious to see what strain. 2565 is the most powdery strain I've ever seen (damn mear needs filtration to clear sometimes), but 029 drops pretty quickly.

He states 029 in the first post.  My kolschs were with 029 but they were probably 7-8 years ago so I can't remember.

Sure enough, my bad. May need to sleep more tonight.   ;)
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Offline coolman26

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Re: Hazy Helles
« Reply #6 on: January 19, 2017, 01:16:00 AM »
My question is how long ago did you brew?  Kolsch yeasts can take 2 months to clear. I doubt it is anything that you added. I'd just give it some time IMO.


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Offline majorvices

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Re: Hazy Helles
« Reply #7 on: January 19, 2017, 01:19:27 AM »
Did you take a pH reading? Also, as was mentioned, WLP029 is very hard to get to clear. Kolsch brewers traditionally filter kolsch, though I've found fining works well.

Offline ram5ey

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Re: Hazy Helles
« Reply #8 on: January 19, 2017, 01:32:28 AM »
It was brewed in mid October. I have heard that Kölsch yeast can be dusty but previous brews with this yeast were very clear. I did not take a ph reading. The water was RO with 89% pils, 9% Munich and 2% honey.  It tastes great but yeah just oddly hazy.
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Offline majorvices

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Re: Hazy Helles
« Reply #9 on: January 19, 2017, 01:05:14 PM »
My guess was your pH was off so you just have a protein haze that won't ever settle. As long as it tastes good, drink it up and think about investing in a decent pH meter or check out the colorpHast strips.

Offline Frankenbrew

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Re: Hazy Helles
« Reply #10 on: January 19, 2017, 02:57:33 PM »
My guess was your pH was off so you just have a protein haze that won't ever settle. As long as it tastes good, drink it up and think about investing in a decent pH meter or check out the colorpHast strips.

This is what I was thinking, too. 029 clears pretty well, so it was probably ph. Kolsch is usually mostly, if not all, pilsner malt which wouldn't necessarily bring a typical ph water down to mashing ph without additions of acid or other aids.
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