Author Topic: blonde ale  (Read 1151 times)

Offline goschman

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blonde ale
« on: January 19, 2017, 04:53:22 PM »
I am tweaking a blonde ale recipe that I used to like but have not brewed in some time.

48% Pilsner
38% Weyermann Pale
9% Wheat
5% Honey Malt

bitter with Magnum
21 g Centennial @ 10 min
~24 IBU

Mangrove Jack M79 Burton Union

The main difference from the original recipe is the base malt which was American Two Row previously and the yeast which was US05. I have a bag of pilsner malt which I use regularly and would like to incorporate. The goal is to make it a bit more malty and complex. I have also considered some Golden Promise or Marris Otter in place of the Weyermann.

I have no experience with M79 but thought it might add a nice character. Any advice regarding temps or usage?

I assume the main feedback will be to get rid of the wheat at that amount?




« Last Edit: January 19, 2017, 05:04:48 PM by goschman »
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Offline dmtaylor

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Re: blonde ale
« Reply #1 on: January 19, 2017, 05:38:11 PM »
Looks great to me.  I'd stick with the pilsner malt and wheat personally.  Call me a nutjob but as much as I've tried to like the UK malts, I've used them so many times over the past 5 years, I've just not been very impressed with Golden Promise or Maris Otter, they are too dang nutty for my liking.  Personal preference.  If nutty is what you like, then switch it up.  If you prefer the soft, honey graham thing from pilsner malt as I do, then stick with that.

I've never used a Mangrove yeast so I cannot comment on that.  I'll be interested to hear how it turns out.
Dave

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Offline Frankenbrew

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Re: blonde ale
« Reply #2 on: January 19, 2017, 05:53:25 PM »
Go easy on the honey malt. I used 1/4 lb. in a 1.060 blond, and it ended up with a noticeably tart finish.
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Offline stpug

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Re: blonde ale
« Reply #3 on: January 19, 2017, 06:07:15 PM »
I HATE Avangard Pale Ale Malt.  I know you're not using it; just thought I'd mention it :D

MJ Burton Union is one of their offerings that I really like, BUT it's very noticeable and distinctive.  It gives an earthy, nutty quality to the beer with subtle fruitiness that is unlike most British yeast, but easily as defining.  In lighter beers (like a blonde), it's character will play the lead role.  It might be good, it might not - one thing is for sure, it won't be an American Blonde ale.

Offline reverseapachemaster

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Re: blonde ale
« Reply #4 on: January 19, 2017, 06:08:38 PM »
I HATE Avangard Pale Ale Malt.  I know you're not using it; just thought I'd mention it :D

Y
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Offline goschman

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Re: blonde ale
« Reply #5 on: January 19, 2017, 06:11:44 PM »
Go easy on the honey malt. I used 1/4 lb. in a 1.060 blond, and it ended up with a noticeably tart finish.

I have used up to 12 oz in batches before. I get more malty sweetness than anything. I can't imagine it contributing to a tart finish in my experience. I have used 8 oz in the prior version multiple times and not had that problem.
« Last Edit: January 19, 2017, 06:17:02 PM by goschman »
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Offline goschman

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Re: blonde ale
« Reply #6 on: January 19, 2017, 06:15:21 PM »
I HATE Avangard Pale Ale Malt.  I know you're not using it; just thought I'd mention it :D

MJ Burton Union is one of their offerings that I really like, BUT it's very noticeable and distinctive.  It gives an earthy, nutty quality to the beer with subtle fruitiness that is unlike most British yeast, but easily as defining.  In lighter beers (like a blonde), it's character will play the lead role.  It might be good, it might not - one thing is for sure, it won't be an American Blonde ale.

Any suggestions on temp? I have seen reviews and comments that it can be relatively clean. I normally ferment ales in the low 60s but don't use English types.

The beer used to be an american blonde and I am okay if it strays away from that a bit. I was originally planning more of a british type blonde prior so this is kind of a hybrid idea.
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Offline JJeffers09

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Re: blonde ale
« Reply #7 on: January 19, 2017, 06:16:10 PM »
1.055 OG
5.5% ABV
BU:GU ~0.42
91% blended base
5% White Wheat
2% Carabrown
2% Honey malt

I like the hybrid American strains 64F
Burton Ale yeast 68F
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Offline goschman

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Re: blonde ale
« Reply #8 on: January 19, 2017, 06:20:50 PM »
From Mangrove Jack:
Famous the world over for its crisp, dry and uniquely malty and hoppy ales, this strain has
been isolated and developed especially for the home and craft brewer from a commercial
brewery in the heartland of British Brewing. Burton Union Yeast is a gentle but rapid
fermenter that generates light and delicate ripe pear esters and does not strip away light
malt character or body. Moderate acidity balances the silky smooth texture of beers
fermented with this strain. When hops or malt aromas are stronger, the yeast contribution
will be neutral. When used in lighter quality malt bases, the hops and esters are able to
shine. Beers made with this yeast are quick to condition, giving you great beer in as little
as 3 weeks

RECOMMENDED TEMPERATURE RANGE:
62-74°F (18-23°C)

I suppose I will just shoot for 66-68F or possibly lower since I am used to pretty clean yeasts...
« Last Edit: January 19, 2017, 06:28:04 PM by goschman »
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Offline stpug

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Re: blonde ale
« Reply #9 on: January 19, 2017, 06:41:27 PM »
I HATE Avangard Pale Ale Malt.  I know you're not using it; just thought I'd mention it :D

Y

I have found it to result in unusually sweet beer with a tangy character (not sour), and yield an excessively dark wort color considering it's SRM value (much like a dark munich malt would do). My best comparison is like it consists of 25% British Crystal 40L in both color and flavor.  The only place I found it useful was dark, roasty beers where it was well hidden. I've like the Avangard pils, munichs, vienna, and wheat. I only bought one sack of this malt and it lasted a couple years because I disliked it so much.  For me, it was a big disappointment.

Offline stpug

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Re: blonde ale
« Reply #10 on: January 19, 2017, 06:50:39 PM »
I HATE Avangard Pale Ale Malt.  I know you're not using it; just thought I'd mention it :D

MJ Burton Union is one of their offerings that I really like, BUT it's very noticeable and distinctive.  It gives an earthy, nutty quality to the beer with subtle fruitiness that is unlike most British yeast, but easily as defining.  In lighter beers (like a blonde), it's character will play the lead role.  It might be good, it might not - one thing is for sure, it won't be an American Blonde ale.

Any suggestions on temp? I have seen reviews and comments that it can be relatively clean. I normally ferment ales in the low 60s but don't use English types.

The beer used to be an american blonde and I am okay if it strays away from that a bit. I was originally planning more of a british type blonde prior so this is kind of a hybrid idea.

The three beers I brewed with it were all fermented in the 64-66F range, but (as you noted) it should be good into the low 70s.  I have not found this to be a "clean" yeast strain from the perspective of ester-neutral; for me, it's contribution was distinct and apparent.  With that said, I liked this strain quite a bit in the few beers I brewed with it (special bitter, nut brown ale, UK pale ale).

Side note: When I went through my MJ yeast testing a couple years ago, I found nearly all of their offering to have considerable lag time.  I rehydrate dry yeast and it usually helps in that regard, but the MJ offerings were slow to get going from the original sachets (lag was 18-36 hours depending on strain and circumstances).  Collected slurry, on the other hand, was quick to get to work.

Offline goschman

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Re: blonde ale
« Reply #11 on: January 19, 2017, 06:54:31 PM »
I HATE Avangard Pale Ale Malt.  I know you're not using it; just thought I'd mention it :D

MJ Burton Union is one of their offerings that I really like, BUT it's very noticeable and distinctive.  It gives an earthy, nutty quality to the beer with subtle fruitiness that is unlike most British yeast, but easily as defining.  In lighter beers (like a blonde), it's character will play the lead role.  It might be good, it might not - one thing is for sure, it won't be an American Blonde ale.

Any suggestions on temp? I have seen reviews and comments that it can be relatively clean. I normally ferment ales in the low 60s but don't use English types.

The beer used to be an american blonde and I am okay if it strays away from that a bit. I was originally planning more of a british type blonde prior so this is kind of a hybrid idea.

The three beers I brewed with it were all fermented in the 64-66F range, but (as you noted) it should be good into the low 70s.  I have not found this to be a "clean" yeast strain from the perspective of ester-neutral; for me, it's contribution was distinct and apparent.  With that said, I liked this strain quite a bit in the few beers I brewed with it (special bitter, nut brown ale, UK pale ale).

Side note: When I went through my MJ yeast testing a couple years ago, I found nearly all of their offering to have considerable lag time.  I rehydrate dry yeast and it usually helps in that regard, but the MJ offerings were slow to get going from the original sachets (lag was 18-36 hours depending on strain and circumstances).  Collected slurry, on the other hand, was quick to get to work.

Thanks for the feedback. I have never used MJ yeasts and don't try new yeasts very often. I will just have to give it a go and see what I get...
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Offline brewinhard

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Re: blonde ale
« Reply #12 on: January 19, 2017, 07:33:55 PM »
I have been pretty successful with American Blonde Ales in recent comps. Usually I shoot for around 20 IBU's, but the last one I brewed for a buddies wedding and wanted to bump up the hops a tad as that is what he likes. I only bumped it up about 4 IBU's to 24 (or so). And although it scored well and took a gold medal against the other APA's in the category, judges deemed it a bit too bitter for the style. Just something to consider if you care.

Offline goschman

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Re: blonde ale
« Reply #13 on: January 19, 2017, 08:53:06 PM »
I have been pretty successful with American Blonde Ales in recent comps. Usually I shoot for around 20 IBU's, but the last one I brewed for a buddies wedding and wanted to bump up the hops a tad as that is what he likes. I only bumped it up about 4 IBU's to 24 (or so). And although it scored well and took a gold medal against the other APA's in the category, judges deemed it a bit too bitter for the style. Just something to consider if you care.

Thanks for the advice. I don't get too caught up in styles. There is almost always at least one thing in most of my beers that takes it out of a particular style.

I have always done previous versions at 24 IBU with good success although bumping them down will help add some maltiness I am looking for. Something to consider for sure.
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Offline tommymorris

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Re: blonde ale
« Reply #14 on: January 20, 2017, 02:22:05 AM »
I don't like English yeasts in a Blonde Ale. I think all the ones I have tried added an unwelcome complexity from the esters.

My 2 cents. YMMV.