Author Topic: Bottle conditioning cider  (Read 2576 times)

Offline ANDREW.GROGAN1

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Bottle conditioning cider
« on: January 23, 2017, 08:39:31 AM »
I started a batch of hard cider back on October.  After primary and secondary, I am sitting at .992.  What’s the best way to bottle condition this?  I am guessing my yeast numbers are probably pretty low.  Do I need to sprinkle some more in when I bottle?   

Offline dmtaylor

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Re: Bottle conditioning cider
« Reply #1 on: January 23, 2017, 11:01:34 AM »
Yes, add a sprinkle of fresh yeast.  Roughly 1/10 pack of yeast will be good enough to carbonate 3-6 gallons, i.e., a little dab'll do ya.  Also don't be surprised when it takes 6-8 weeks to carbonate.  It will carb just fine but will take a bit of time.

Cheers.
Dave

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Offline ANDREW.GROGAN1

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Re: Bottle conditioning cider
« Reply #2 on: January 23, 2017, 11:09:05 AM »
Yes, add a sprinkle of fresh yeast.  Roughly 1/10 pack of yeast will be good enough to carbonate 3-6 gallons, i.e., a little dab'll do ya.  Also don't be surprised when it takes 6-8 weeks to carbonate.  It will carb just fine but will take a bit of time.

Cheers.

So enough sugar to carb to the level I want and a pinch of yeast....Sounds like a plan

Offline denny

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Re: Bottle conditioning cider
« Reply #3 on: January 23, 2017, 11:10:42 AM »
I have never added additional yeast when bottling and I've had perfect carbonation without it.
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Offline ANDREW.GROGAN1

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Re: Bottle conditioning cider
« Reply #4 on: January 23, 2017, 11:15:48 AM »
I have never added additional yeast when bottling and I've had perfect carbonation without it.

I'd rather not add anything but the priming sugar, but I figured with how long it's been sitting, I would have to. 

Offline denny

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Re: Bottle conditioning cider
« Reply #5 on: January 23, 2017, 11:38:16 AM »
I have never added additional yeast when bottling and I've had perfect carbonation without it.

I'd rather not add anything but the priming sugar, but I figured with how long it's been sitting, I would have to.

Your choice.  My experience is that it's not necessary, so I don't do it.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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Offline dmtaylor

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Re: Bottle conditioning cider
« Reply #6 on: January 23, 2017, 11:46:12 AM »
I've made quite a few flat ciders over the years.  I always prime but don't always get carbonation.  Adding fresh yeast will help make carbonation a guarantee.
Dave

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Offline Stevie

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Re: Bottle conditioning cider
« Reply #7 on: January 23, 2017, 12:26:01 PM »
I've made quite a few flat ciders over the years.  I always prime but don't always get carbonation.  Adding fresh yeast will help make carbonation a guarantee.
I agree with this.

Offline Kutaka

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Re: Bottle conditioning cider
« Reply #8 on: January 24, 2017, 11:55:39 AM »
Bottle priming calculators assume you have X amount of residual co2, but they don't factor extended storage time.  Since you made this in October, you probably have very little co2 in solution.  So if you want to carb to a specific level, you will need more sugar than the calculator specifies. 

Adding yeast may not always be necessary, but it's cheap insurance for carbonation.  A longer storage situation would be a good time to use some bottling yeast.  Champagne yeast is less than a dollar and it's a good choice for this purpose.


Offline skyler

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Re: Bottle conditioning cider
« Reply #9 on: January 24, 2017, 02:00:49 PM »
FWIW, I used 2 cans of frozen apple juice concentrate (no additives) to prime my 5 gal ciders and the carbonation was pretty good. I've heard of adding as many as 3 cans to get even more carbonation, but I haven't tried it.

Offline Kutaka

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Re: Bottle conditioning cider
« Reply #10 on: January 24, 2017, 02:22:49 PM »
FWIW, I used 2 cans of frozen apple juice concentrate (no additives) to prime my 5 gal ciders and the carbonation was pretty good. I've heard of adding as many as 3 cans to get even more carbonation, but I haven't tried it.

Since bottling is a process that risks exploding glass in your face, I think you need to be a little more scientific about how much priming sugar to add and not make bottle priming recommendations to strangers based on things you've heard.



 

Offline skyler

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Re: Bottle conditioning cider
« Reply #11 on: January 24, 2017, 02:40:45 PM »
Since bottling is a process that risks exploding glass in your face, I think you need to be a little more scientific about how much priming sugar to add and not make bottle priming recommendations to strangers based on things you've heard.

::Meow::

Offline Kutaka

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Re: Bottle conditioning cider
« Reply #12 on: January 24, 2017, 02:44:02 PM »

Since bottling is a process that risks exploding glass in your face

No it isn't - not at anywhere near that amount of sugar. Maybe you should stop getting your fermentation advice from cable TV shows.

Prove it with numbers. 

Depending on various factors, 2 cans is enough to be over carbonated.  3 cans is enough to explode some bottles. 

Suggesting priming sugar increments in quantities of frozen apple juice cans is irresponsible.  No, I didn't learn that on TV.

Offline Kutaka

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Re: Bottle conditioning cider
« Reply #13 on: January 24, 2017, 02:46:00 PM »
Your edit didn't happen before I quoted the original.

Meow?

Offline stevedorau

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Re: Bottle conditioning cider
« Reply #14 on: January 26, 2017, 09:34:40 PM »
Bottle priming calculators assume you have X amount of residual co2, but they don't factor extended storage time.  Since you made this in October, you probably have very little co2 in solution.  So if you want to carb to a specific level, you will need more sugar than the calculator specifies. 

Adding yeast may not always be necessary, but it's cheap insurance for carbonation.  A longer storage situation would be a good time to use some bottling yeast.  Champagne yeast is less than a dollar and it's a good choice for this purpose.
My understanding of residual CO2 is it is related to the partial pressure of CO2 at a specific temperature and atmospheric pressure. It's the natural balance in a solution. Sitting for a long time does not inherently reduce the CO2 concentration. Since you generally wait some period of time for fermentation to be completed, CO2 should remain fairly steady after that point.

Caution should be used when switching yeast at bottling. A different strain of yeast may ferment sugars left behind by the yeast used for primary fermentation. If the bottling yeast is able to ferment the unused sugars, you could end up with an over carbonated cider or  worse, bottle bombs. I would recommend using the same yeast that you use for primary fermentation. Even if it is not a very alcohol tolerant strain, it should function well enough for bottling.
« Last Edit: January 26, 2017, 09:38:01 PM by stevedorau »