Author Topic: Canning your home-brew  (Read 11463 times)

Offline coombre

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Canning your home-brew
« on: January 31, 2017, 11:00:28 PM »
Anyone have any good information or experience with canning your homebrews?

-Manufacturer/make/model/pricing

Ive seen some on-line for around $1500 sans the cans.

cheers.
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Offline The Beerery

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Re: Canning your home-brew
« Reply #1 on: February 01, 2017, 12:09:59 AM »
I recall a thread on here.  I am interested, but I have reservations! 


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Offline c0utz

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Re: Canning your home-brew
« Reply #2 on: February 01, 2017, 12:14:11 AM »
This thread intrigues me. Subbed!

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Offline natebrews

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Re: Canning your home-brew
« Reply #3 on: February 01, 2017, 12:14:43 AM »
This is slightly tangential, but I think I have heard of mobile canners that are willing to can up a bunch of beer if a club can get together and provide enough material to bother spooling the machinery up.  I really have no details beyond that, but it is something that I think is out there. (sorry to be nebulous)
Risk of failure should be no deterrent to trying.

Offline coombre

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Re: Canning your home-brew
« Reply #4 on: February 01, 2017, 12:15:09 AM »
I recall a thread on here.  I am interested, but I have reservations! 


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Same here.  It would be awesome to be able to share homebrews in cans and I prefer the can look too.
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Offline The Beerery

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Re: Canning your home-brew
« Reply #5 on: February 01, 2017, 12:20:13 AM »
Oh yea. Cans are fantastic for storage,sharing, and oxidation. However it's getting it into the cans that worries me. I would gladly pay thousands of dollars for a surefire system.


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Offline coombre

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Re: Canning your home-brew
« Reply #6 on: February 01, 2017, 12:20:32 AM »
This is slightly tangential, but I think I have heard of mobile canners that are willing to can up a bunch of beer if a club can get together and provide enough material to bother spooling the machinery up.  I really have no details beyond that, but it is something that I think is out there. (sorry to be nebulous)

no worries  :) I have heard of the mobile canning services as well but are they willing to come out to your place (if they are in a certain distance of your home) is a consideration along with the price it costs per home-brew canning session.

The initial cost of the can seamer is steep but if it is a method that you are going to use consistently, I think it's justifiable.  I've heard of cans and lids being ~30-40 cents a piece as well.
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Offline coombre

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Re: Canning your home-brew
« Reply #7 on: February 01, 2017, 12:22:12 AM »
Oh yea. Cans are fantastic for storage,sharing, and oxidation. However it's getting it into the cans that worries me. I would gladly pay thousands of dollars for a surefire system.


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right.  Im not sure if I would naturally carb with priming sugar or from an already carbed brew.  Im stoked to get into canning though.  cheee
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Offline BrewBama

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Offline The Beerery

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Re: Canning your home-brew
« Reply #9 on: February 01, 2017, 12:48:45 AM »
https://canseamer.myshopify.com/


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Offline natebrews

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Re: Canning your home-brew
« Reply #11 on: February 01, 2017, 01:02:58 AM »
Along these lines, there was a recent Brew Strong episode on canning.  That was around the professional systems and the costs and whatever else associated with it.

Jamil talked about the DO levels that they get in the cans, and how different grades of canning lines would provide better or worse levels.  For their stuff (Heretic brewing) he said that they were able to get down to the 35-50ppb levels, while a lower cost system may leave it in the multiple ppm levels. 

I only bring that up, since I can only imagine that a home canner would be much higher levels than a pro system.  Due to this, I think you would likely want to can condition the beer.  Not that can conditioning would be a problem, I just think it might be the way that you would have to go to keep the stuff from oxidizing too quickly in the cans.
Risk of failure should be no deterrent to trying.

Offline The Beerery

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Canning your home-brew
« Reply #12 on: February 01, 2017, 01:28:36 AM »
Along these lines, there was a recent Brew Strong episode on canning.  That was around the professional systems and the costs and whatever else associated with it.

Jamil talked about the DO levels that they get in the cans, and how different grades of canning lines would provide better or worse levels.  For their stuff (Heretic brewing) he said that they were able to get down to the 35-50ppb levels, while a lower cost system may leave it in the multiple ppm levels. 

I only bring that up, since I can only imagine that a home canner would be much higher levels than a pro system.  Due to this, I think you would likely want to can condition the beer.  Not that can conditioning would be a problem, I just think it might be the way that you would have to go to keep the stuff from oxidizing too quickly in the cans.
Boomshakalaka.  You nailed my concerns there!

The maximum accepted DO limit in packaging is .015ppm. Even there you will notice accelerated flavor loss.  Heat is a major factor as well in the aging process. Anywho. I would love a canning line! 


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« Last Edit: February 01, 2017, 01:30:58 AM by The Beerery »

Offline coombre

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Re: Canning your home-brew
« Reply #13 on: February 01, 2017, 02:16:37 AM »
Along these lines, there was a recent Brew Strong episode on canning.  That was around the professional systems and the costs and whatever else associated with it.

Jamil talked about the DO levels that they get in the cans, and how different grades of canning lines would provide better or worse levels.  For their stuff (Heretic brewing) he said that they were able to get down to the 35-50ppb levels, while a lower cost system may leave it in the multiple ppm levels. 

I only bring that up, since I can only imagine that a home canner would be much higher levels than a pro system.  Due to this, I think you would likely want to can condition the beer.  Not that can conditioning would be a problem, I just think it might be the way that you would have to go to keep the stuff from oxidizing too quickly in the cans.
Boomshakalaka.  You nailed my concerns there!

The maximum accepted DO limit in packaging is .015ppm. Even there you will notice accelerated flavor loss.  Heat is a major factor as well in the aging process. Anywho. I would love a canning line! 


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Spot on mates.  Although I prefer to drink my brews fresh and quick as possible, that is definitely one of my concerns as well. 

Does can conditioning take the same amount of time as bottle conditioning?  Same process I assume...
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Offline Stevie

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Re: Canning your home-brew
« Reply #14 on: February 01, 2017, 02:22:11 AM »
Same as bottles. There might be some adjustments due to head space, but primed, pack, seal