Author Topic: Hop aroma  (Read 1688 times)

Offline Maxbrewer

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Hop aroma
« on: February 12, 2017, 10:24:38 PM »
I can never seem to get a good hop aroma in any of my beers, despite adding 100% of my hop bill within the last minutes. I always use aromatic hops with low a alpha percentage. My beers always seem to turn more bitter than aromatic.

I even dry hopped once and that didn't improve the aroma, it just seemed more bitter. I'm not sure what's wrong. I've been brewing for years and have never been able to produce a good aromatic beer.

Offline curtdogg

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Re: Hop aroma
« Reply #1 on: February 12, 2017, 10:31:47 PM »
Do you adjust your water chemistry and pH?

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Hop aroma
« Reply #2 on: February 12, 2017, 11:18:28 PM »
As someone who brews hoppy beers, I can give you a couple hints to get better aroma.

1/  In ales, take all the hops you'd have added in the last 20 minutes and add them post boil after cooling to 170F. Let them steep for 30 mins, gently stirring frequently, then replacing the lid. Then cool as normal.

2/ If you keg, purge the keg before filling by filling the keg with sanitizer and pumping the keg empty. This gives you a purged keg, as air contact oxidizes hop character very quickly. This helps greatly to avoid hop aroma oxidation.

3/ Again if you keg, dry hop in the keg using a 5 gallon paint strainer bag, zip tied shut. This traps the hop aromas in your keg and that's a good thing. I leave the hops in there.

Hope this helps!
Jon H.

Offline Maxbrewer

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Re: Hop aroma
« Reply #3 on: February 12, 2017, 11:31:45 PM »
I don't adjust water chemistry nor PH

Offline Ellismr

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Re: Hop aroma
« Reply #4 on: February 13, 2017, 10:49:44 AM »
As someone who brews hoppy beers, I can give you a couple hints to get better aroma.

1/  In ales, take all the hops you'd have added in the last 20 minutes and add them post boil after cooling to 170F. Let them steep for 30 mins, gently stirring frequently, then replacing the lid. Then cool as normal.

2/ If you keg, purge the keg before filling by filling the keg with sanitizer and pumping the keg empty. This gives you a purged keg, as air contact oxidizes hop character very quickly. This helps greatly to avoid hop aroma oxidation.

3/ Again if you keg, dry hop in the keg using a 5 gallon paint strainer bag, zip tied shut. This traps the hop aromas in your keg and that's a good thing. I leave the hops in there.

Hope this helps!
I agree with all of the above except I've never tried keg dry hopping. 

I would add that I use Beersmith and I adjust my water profile using its water tool.  I adjust my water to a target called Tasty's hoppy water.  It's from a guy on the brewing network.  I've never not been happy with the results.


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Offline tonyccopeland

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Re: Hop aroma
« Reply #5 on: February 13, 2017, 11:17:34 AM »
I recently have been underwhelmed by my hoppy beers.   For me, it was making the decision to stop buying hops from previous crop years that are on blowout sales.  I think quality of the ingredients (hops) is an important consideration as well.

-Tony

-Tony

Offline pete b

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Re: Hop aroma
« Reply #6 on: February 13, 2017, 01:00:37 PM »
All the advice here is very good but it's assuming you keg and are an all grain brewer. If you are an extract brewer don't worry about the water chemistry other than making sure there is no chlorine.Purging and dry hopping in the keg is great if you keg but you can still do great if you don't.
As to the bitterness problem it's probably not from the late hops. I would back off on any boil additions. Just, using an online calculator, add one 60 minute dose for a modest amount of ibus, like 50. Then don't add any until the 170 degree or less whirlpool that Hoosier mentioned. Then dry hop in a bag when primary is about done. Use lots of hops in these late additions. If you keg add more in the keg but if you bottle that's fine. Once the bottles are carbed drink them soon. Also, when I pour a hoppy beer I finish with a flourish as I hold it up to my nose to get the full effect.
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Offline erockrph

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Re: Hop aroma
« Reply #7 on: February 13, 2017, 03:53:37 PM »
How much hops are you using? You want at least 1-2 ounces per gallon in the whirlpool or dry hop.

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Offline brewinhard

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Re: Hop aroma
« Reply #8 on: February 13, 2017, 03:56:13 PM »
As someone who brews hoppy beers, I can give you a couple hints to get better aroma.


3/ Again if you keg, dry hop in the keg using a 5 gallon paint strainer bag, zip tied shut. This traps the hop aromas in your keg and that's a good thing. I leave the hops in there.

Hope this helps!

Jon, when you go this route do you notice added hop haze or do the beers pour fairly clear given time?

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Hop aroma
« Reply #9 on: February 13, 2017, 04:11:13 PM »
As someone who brews hoppy beers, I can give you a couple hints to get better aroma.


3/ Again if you keg, dry hop in the keg using a 5 gallon paint strainer bag, zip tied shut. This traps the hop aromas in your keg and that's a good thing. I leave the hops in there.

Hope this helps!

Jon, when you go this route do you notice added hop haze or do the beers pour fairly clear given time?


I'm assuming you mean particulate haze, and not the initial oil haze that you get. Very little particulate haze with one bag, but some initially. Basically zero if you use a bag inside a bag - that's what I'm doing. Those bags are pretty fine mesh and the extra filter layer of the second bag gets it done.
Jon H.

Offline brewinhard

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Re: Hop aroma
« Reply #10 on: February 13, 2017, 07:41:51 PM »
Ahhhh, the old two bag approach, huh?  Interesting sir.

Offline el_capitan

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Re: Hop aroma
« Reply #11 on: February 14, 2017, 01:22:04 AM »
I always use the white nylons that you can get at Walmart.  25 cents for a little egg with two in there.  Works great for pellets or whole hops, and I've packed up to about 4 oz leaf hops in a bag with no problem.  It's like a hop sausage when you pull it out later on!  No problems with any hop particulate whatsoever.

Offline gman23

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Re: Hop aroma
« Reply #12 on: February 14, 2017, 03:15:06 AM »
I use muslin bags to keg hop with. I get a lot of debris for the first week while it carbs and I take small samples.

Just make sure you are using enough hops. I never got the results I wanted until I considerably increased my late and dry hop amounts. I am still pretty conservative compared to most but like my results.

Oh yeah hop selection is important as well. Hops with higher oil content will pack a bigger punch.
« Last Edit: February 14, 2017, 03:45:09 AM by goschman »
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Offline Andor

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Re: Hop aroma
« Reply #13 on: February 15, 2017, 07:23:27 PM »
I bottled my beer for the first 4 years that I brewed. I was adjusting my water, whirlpool, dry hop etc but my hoppy beers always had the same dull bitter flavor and aroma by the time they were ready to drink. I tried a few times throughout the years but eventually just decided I'm better off just buying ipas. The IPA I did recently now that I'm kegging was much much better. I know not everyone has room/ money for a kegging setup but if you do kegging/reducing oxidation will be a big improvement

Offline majorvices

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Re: Hop aroma
« Reply #14 on: February 16, 2017, 01:08:19 AM »
There's a lot of good information here but to reinforce nothing kills hops aroma and flavor faster than oxidation. while you do want to aerate your beer prior to pitching yeast you want to make sure you aren't blasting the hop aroma out by over aerating or running the air at too high a volume.

Also, high fermentation temperatures can tend to mask some hoop aroma with fusel alcohols that will detract from hoppy goodness.