Author Topic: Raspberry Wheat Help  (Read 534 times)

Offline polishsausage5150

  • 1st Kit
  • *
  • Posts: 7
    • View Profile
Raspberry Wheat Help
« on: February 27, 2017, 08:48:41 PM »
I realize taste is subjective so there are no wrong answers here, just trying to gauge your input.

I'm going to be making a raspberry wheat which will be essentially me adding raspberry extract to the keg at packaging. I really want a nice shot of raspberry flavor, not just a hint because my wife really enjoys the fruit beers with lots of fruit flavor.

Do you think the full four ounces that come in the bottle will be overkill or should it be just right?

Offline Stevie

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 6858
    • View Profile
Re: Raspberry Wheat Help
« Reply #1 on: February 27, 2017, 08:59:18 PM »
Never used raspberry extract, but best course is to add some, taste, adjust.

Offline HoosierBrew

  • Global Moderator
  • I must live here
  • *****
  • Posts: 13030
  • Indianapolis,IN
    • View Profile
Re: Raspberry Wheat Help
« Reply #2 on: February 27, 2017, 09:03:26 PM »
I realize taste is subjective so there are no wrong answers here, just trying to gauge your input.

I'm going to be making a raspberry wheat which will be essentially me adding raspberry extract to the keg at packaging. I really want a nice shot of raspberry flavor, not just a hint because my wife really enjoys the fruit beers with lots of fruit flavor.

Do you think the full four ounces that come in the bottle will be overkill or should it be just right?

It won't be overkill necessarily, but it may have an artificial character. If you can afford the extra $18-ish, a can of raspberry puree from your local shop is VASTLY superior. You ferment the base beer first, then rack the beer to secondary, on top of the puree. Wait 2 weeks for the fruit to ferment and package.
Jon H.

Offline polishsausage5150

  • 1st Kit
  • *
  • Posts: 7
    • View Profile
Re: Raspberry Wheat Help
« Reply #3 on: February 27, 2017, 09:07:35 PM »
I realize taste is subjective so there are no wrong answers here, just trying to gauge your input.

I'm going to be making a raspberry wheat which will be essentially me adding raspberry extract to the keg at packaging. I really want a nice shot of raspberry flavor, not just a hint because my wife really enjoys the fruit beers with lots of fruit flavor.

Do you think the full four ounces that come in the bottle will be overkill or should it be just right?

It won't be overkill necessarily, but it may have an artificial character. If you can afford the extra $18-ish, a can of raspberry puree from your local shop is VASTLY superior. You ferment the base beer first, then rack the beer to secondary, on top of the puree. Wait 2 weeks for the fruit to ferment and package.

I tried a raspberry puree before as well.  The result was a severely contaminated and terrible batch of beer.  I don't know what caused it.  It was either a sanitation issue with the puree (which I've been told shouldn't have been an issue) or the puree caused a secondary fermentation which led to off flavors.  That's why I thought I would give extract a shot this time and see if I have better results.

Offline HoosierBrew

  • Global Moderator
  • I must live here
  • *****
  • Posts: 13030
  • Indianapolis,IN
    • View Profile
Re: Raspberry Wheat Help
« Reply #4 on: February 27, 2017, 09:15:09 PM »
If you already have the extract, go for it. FWIW I make fruit beers semi regularly for my wife with puree - never had an infection in a fruit beer. And of course there would be a secondary ferment from the fruit, but that doesn't automatically give off flavors, provided your sanitation is good. $0.02 .
Jon H.

Offline Frankenbrew

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 669
  • South Shore Brew Club, SE Massachusetts
    • View Profile
Re: Raspberry Wheat Help
« Reply #5 on: February 27, 2017, 09:43:29 PM »
If you already have the extract, go for it. FWIW I make fruit beers semi regularly for my wife with puree - never had an infection in a fruit beer. And of course there would be a secondary ferment from the fruit, but that doesn't automatically give off flavors, provided your sanitation is good. $0.02 .

I totally agree with HoosierBrew here. I do this all the time and have never had a problem.

Another option is frozen raspberries from the supermarket. Four bags of frozen raspberries equal a can of puree and pretty much do the same thing. I recently made a chocolate raspberry saison with frozen supermarket raspberries that came out awesome.
Frank C.

And thereof comes the proverb: 'Blessing of your
heart, you brew good ale.'

Offline polishsausage5150

  • 1st Kit
  • *
  • Posts: 7
    • View Profile
Re: Raspberry Wheat Help
« Reply #6 on: February 27, 2017, 09:52:42 PM »
If you already have the extract, go for it. FWIW I make fruit beers semi regularly for my wife with puree - never had an infection in a fruit beer. And of course there would be a secondary ferment from the fruit, but that doesn't automatically give off flavors, provided your sanitation is good. $0.02 .

Maybe I'll give the puree a second go 'round.  When I had the first bad experience with it I racked it on top of the puree into a secondary after one week of fermentation and then after another week I bottled.  Could not letting it get that second fermentation of the fruit out before bottling have something to do with the awful taste?

Offline Frankenbrew

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 669
  • South Shore Brew Club, SE Massachusetts
    • View Profile
Re: Raspberry Wheat Help
« Reply #7 on: February 27, 2017, 09:59:30 PM »
I think that as far as fruits go, raspberry can have quite an impact on a beer, so your best bet is to taste frequently and package it when the flavor is where you want it.
Frank C.

And thereof comes the proverb: 'Blessing of your
heart, you brew good ale.'

Offline HoosierBrew

  • Global Moderator
  • I must live here
  • *****
  • Posts: 13030
  • Indianapolis,IN
    • View Profile
Re: Raspberry Wheat Help
« Reply #8 on: February 27, 2017, 10:31:54 PM »
If you already have the extract, go for it. FWIW I make fruit beers semi regularly for my wife with puree - never had an infection in a fruit beer. And of course there would be a secondary ferment from the fruit, but that doesn't automatically give off flavors, provided your sanitation is good. $0.02 .

Maybe I'll give the puree a second go 'round.  When I had the first bad experience with it I racked it on top of the puree into a secondary after one week of fermentation and then after another week I bottled.  Could not letting it get that second fermentation of the fruit out before bottling have something to do with the awful taste?


I don't think that bottling too soon was a big factor in that regard, but at a week there would likely beer fermentation still going on. If you bottle, you run the risk of bottle bombs. I'd definitely wait 2 weeks after adding the fruit to package.I honestly think that batch may have had sub par sanitation. Everybody here has been there before. Good luck!
Jon H.

Offline mabrungard

  • Brewmaster General
  • *******
  • Posts: 2359
  • Water matters!
    • View Profile
    • Bru'n Water
Re: Raspberry Wheat Help
« Reply #9 on: February 28, 2017, 05:47:17 PM »
I can tell you that monitoring and adjusting the final beer pH can significantly alter these crisp and fruity beers. I apricot to raspberry, but the pH effect is similar. I find that bringing the beer pH down around 4 to 4.2 is helpful for making those beers more lively and crisp.

I recommend performing pH and extract adjustments to taste after the base beer is fermented. Since the yeast have done most of the beer's pH adjustment, it doesn't take much acid to drop the pH down a couple of tenths. That means that lactic acid can be a good choice for this application and its not likely to create a lactate twang. Other options can include citric and malic acids since they can impart fruity notes to the beer that might be welcome.

Fruit Extracts are a touchy subject. I think that their freshness and potential for oxidation need to be considered. I've recently moved to extracts from Olive Nation and have been fairly pleased with the results. But I did notice a dropoff in the flavor when I used an already opened bottle for a subsequent batch.
Martin B
Carmel, IN

BJCP National
Foam Blowers of Indiana (FBI)

Brewing Water Information at:
https://sites.google.com/site/brunwater/

Like Bru'n Water on Facebook
https://www.facebook.com/Brun-Water-464551136933908/?ref=bookmarks

Offline EnkAMania

  • Assistant Brewer
  • ***
  • Posts: 162
    • View Profile
Re: Raspberry Wheat Help
« Reply #10 on: February 28, 2017, 06:17:02 PM »
I combine puree and extract.  It works great with strawberries, watermelon and pineapple.  After about 4 days in the fermenter, I add the fruit.  At kegging I add the extract
Some day we'll look back on this and it will all seem funny

Offline bayareabrewer

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 532
    • View Profile
Re: Raspberry Wheat Help
« Reply #11 on: February 28, 2017, 07:22:27 PM »
I can tell you that monitoring and adjusting the final beer pH can significantly alter these crisp and fruity beers. I apricot to raspberry, but the pH effect is similar. I find that bringing the beer pH down around 4 to 4.2 is helpful for making those beers more lively and crisp.

I recommend performing pH and extract adjustments to taste after the base beer is fermented. Since the yeast have done most of the beer's pH adjustment, it doesn't take much acid to drop the pH down a couple of tenths. That means that lactic acid can be a good choice for this application and its not likely to create a lactate twang. Other options can include citric and malic acids since they can impart fruity notes to the beer that might be welcome.

Fruit Extracts are a touchy subject. I think that their freshness and potential for oxidation need to be considered. I've recently moved to extracts from Olive Nation and have been fairly pleased with the results. But I did notice a dropoff in the flavor when I used an already opened bottle for a subsequent batch.

awesome knowledge! Any experience with fruits and sour/wild beers? My sours are usually 3-4 to 3.6 at packaging.

Offline mabrungard

  • Brewmaster General
  • *******
  • Posts: 2359
  • Water matters!
    • View Profile
    • Bru'n Water
Re: Raspberry Wheat Help
« Reply #12 on: March 01, 2017, 01:57:36 AM »
3.4 to 3.6 is tart without being really assertive. I've made Berliners at 3 to 3.1 and that is too tart. They are great for small samples, but excessive if you try to drink a pint. I have a clubmate that won a pro-am contest with a Berliner and he says that 3.5 is the highest he would consider acceptable for a Berliner. Based on my and his experience, it seems that 3.2 to 3.5 may be an appropriate pH range. Of course, personal preference should guide.
Martin B
Carmel, IN

BJCP National
Foam Blowers of Indiana (FBI)

Brewing Water Information at:
https://sites.google.com/site/brunwater/

Like Bru'n Water on Facebook
https://www.facebook.com/Brun-Water-464551136933908/?ref=bookmarks