Author Topic: Crushed grain powder  (Read 3371 times)

Offline el_capitan

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Re: Crushed grain powder
« Reply #15 on: March 13, 2017, 03:47:41 PM »
I've ben using a JSP MaltMill for nearly 20 years and literally tons of grain.  It still works as well as it did the first time I used it and I get a great crush.  I would be hard pressed to recommend any other based on my experience.

+1  I've been using the JSP for about 10 years now with zero problems.  I motorized it with a low RPM, high torque direct drive motor (very safe) and it chows through grain like a pro.  Once I got a pebble in my grain sack, and that stopped it, but there was no damage to the system. 

Offline Zaxxle

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Re: Crushed grain powder
« Reply #16 on: March 13, 2017, 05:02:50 PM »
thanks for all the help guys! my wife said to wait on the grain crusher so thats what is happening lol. Thank you Denny for mentioning your findings about milled grain staying good for a few months at the least.

Glad i asked about the dust, my first instinct was to sift it all out so that could have caused me some headaches.

Offline WattsOnTap

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Re: Crushed grain powder
« Reply #17 on: March 13, 2017, 06:43:16 PM »
+1  I've been using the JSP for about 10 years now with zero problems.  I motorized it with a low RPM, high torque direct drive motor (very safe) and it chows through grain like a pro.  Once I got a pebble in my grain sack, and that stopped it, but there was no damage to the system.

What motor are you using and where'd you find it?  One of these days I'm going to get tired of holding the trigger on the drill...

Offline coolman26

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Re: Crushed grain powder
« Reply #18 on: March 13, 2017, 07:00:28 PM »
Any mill is better than no mill, and money well spent. Milled grain oxidizes in a hurry....fresh is best.
Agree can't argue against a mill. I have no idea on freshness. I'm always milling grain a year, or even 2, after I buy it. Still makes great beer IMO.


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Offline el_capitan

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Re: Crushed grain powder
« Reply #19 on: March 18, 2017, 06:45:07 PM »
+1  I've been using the JSP for about 10 years now with zero problems.  I motorized it with a low RPM, high torque direct drive motor (very safe) and it chows through grain like a pro.  Once I got a pebble in my grain sack, and that stopped it, but there was no damage to the system.

What motor are you using and where'd you find it?  One of these days I'm going to get tired of holding the trigger on the drill...

I got it from a friend of mine who owns a restaurant supply shop, and he pulled it off a pizza dough mixer, I think.  It's a Dayton Shaded Pole Gearmotor Brake, 2.6 amp, 30 RPM, 113 in.lb torque, 1/10 HP. 


Offline coolman26

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Re: Crushed grain powder
« Reply #20 on: March 19, 2017, 09:54:12 AM »

This is mine, works great with the speed controller. I have less than $35 in it. 


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Offline natebrews

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Re: Crushed grain powder
« Reply #21 on: March 19, 2017, 09:59:58 AM »
Is that a Wizard drill?!  I have a big Wizard (there were a few sizes) and it turns slow but it always turns, torque is not an issue.
Risk of failure should be no deterrent to trying.

Offline coolman26

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Re: Crushed grain powder
« Reply #22 on: March 19, 2017, 10:40:04 AM »
Not sure, thought it was a B&Decker. It is 700rpm alone, so I reduce it by half. All I had to do was remove the handle and make a spacer.  Pipe thread matched the handle spot w a nut underneath. Super easy and works great. I like cheap and easy. 


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Offline brewinhard

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Re: Crushed grain powder
« Reply #23 on: March 19, 2017, 01:09:02 PM »
Just a side....

I have been conditioning my grain for the last 4-5 batches or so, and I get very minimal dust/flour (as in really none at all) compared to before when I did not condition. It only takes a few minutes and is very easy to do. Would not do it if it wasnt easy.

Offline el_capitan

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Re: Crushed grain powder
« Reply #24 on: March 22, 2017, 08:06:02 PM »
Just a side....

I have been conditioning my grain for the last 4-5 batches or so, and I get very minimal dust/flour (as in really none at all) compared to before when I did not condition. It only takes a few minutes and is very easy to do. Would not do it if it wasnt easy.

I condition mine too, and set the mill gap on my JSP as tight as it goes.  Malt conditioning is pretty cool - post crush, I have to pick up a handful to make sure the grains are crushed, since the hull stays so intact.  Often times I'm looking at empty grain hulls with a fully crushed endosperm. 

Offline denny

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Re: Crushed grain powder
« Reply #25 on: March 23, 2017, 08:50:27 AM »
I condition mine too, and set the mill gap on my JSP as tight as it goes.  Malt conditioning is pretty cool - post crush, I have to pick up a handful to make sure the grains are crushed, since the hull stays so intact.  Often times I'm looking at empty grain hulls with a fully crushed endosperm.

FWIW I set the gap on my JSP as tight as it will go and don't condition.  Never had a problem.  My hulls don't stay intact, but I don't know what benefit that would be anyway.  I guess it comes down to I don't have a problem that I see conditioning as fixing.
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Offline natebrews

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Re: Crushed grain powder
« Reply #26 on: March 23, 2017, 10:03:11 AM »
Just from a practical standpoint, I found that conditioning it really cut down on the dust that it kicked up.  In winter I'm milling it inside, so the less dust that I make everywhere the better. 

Aside from that, I think that the (roughly) intact husks have improved the runoff I get in beers that have a lot of "sticky" things in it like oats, rye, wheat, etc. 
Risk of failure should be no deterrent to trying.

Offline stpug

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Re: Crushed grain powder
« Reply #27 on: March 23, 2017, 10:10:34 AM »
Just from a practical standpoint, I found that conditioning it really cut down on the dust that it kicked up.  In winter I'm milling it inside, so the less dust that I make everywhere the better. 

I've had the same experience going from a staticy and dusty mill (pre-conditioning) to a nearly clean mill (post-conditioning).  I still mill outside but cleaning the mill is definitely easier.  For me, I guess from the standpoint of time it's a wash: lose 2 minute conditioning, gain 2 minutes cleaning the mill.

Offline brewinhard

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Re: Crushed grain powder
« Reply #28 on: March 23, 2017, 11:19:04 AM »
Just from a practical standpoint, I found that conditioning it really cut down on the dust that it kicked up.  In winter I'm milling it inside, so the less dust that I make everywhere the better. 

I've had the same experience going from a staticy and dusty mill (pre-conditioning) to a nearly clean mill (post-conditioning).  I still mill outside but cleaning the mill is definitely easier.  For me, I guess from the standpoint of time it's a wash: lose 2 minute conditioning, gain 2 minutes cleaning the mill.

+1 to this. And in addition, when I also find myself not having to spend nearly as much time stirring my mash to get it thoroughly mixed well (and have yet to even get 1 doughball that I have had to break up since conditioning my malt too). As in, maybe 4-5 stirs total, and that is strictly just to make sure there is little stratification of temps going on.

Offline ynotbrusum

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Re: Crushed grain powder
« Reply #29 on: March 23, 2017, 03:00:05 PM »
I condition mine too, and set the mill gap on my JSP as tight as it goes.  Malt conditioning is pretty cool - post crush, I have to pick up a handful to make sure the grains are crushed, since the hull stays so intact.  Often times I'm looking at empty grain hulls with a fully crushed endosperm.

FWIW I set the gap on my JSP as tight as it will go and don't condition.  Never had a problem.  My hulls don't stay intact, but I don't know what benefit that would be anyway.  I guess it comes down to I don't have a problem that I see conditioning as fixing.

How tight is "as tight as it will go"?  I found with my fully adjustable JSP Malt Mill that tightening too far would cause too much torque to use my 20V cordless drill with it, so I returned to ".030" as a reasonable setting.  I have been conditioning the grain lately and like the "less dust" created with that.  I BIAB with recirc mostly now, so I could go finer if the mill can still turn the rollers with the tighter setting.
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