Author Topic: When and how to adjust mash pH  (Read 5154 times)

Offline denny

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Re: When and how to adjust mash pH
« Reply #30 on: April 21, 2017, 02:33:39 PM »
I think we found a maltster that's sure his sh*t don't stink.

Listen dmtaylor does his thing.  He may be beating on his own drum but creativity and science is what we are all in this for...

To each his own.  Meanwhile if it works for him who are we to judge?

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Says the guy who's flippin' everyone off in his profile pic.

And you think my post isn't sarcastic?  Hey look jjeffers, gullible is written in the ceiling!

dmtaylor gathers attention by posting things that are on the edge, same thing that Denny does with his "lazy ways" brewing.  They try to establish a reputation for themselves with these initiatives and of course they enjoy the attention it brings them.

You southern boys need things splain'd a little more than usual, don't ya?  ..|.

You are dangerously close....
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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Offline PharmBrewer

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Re: When and how to adjust mash pH
« Reply #31 on: April 21, 2017, 02:37:47 PM »
Everyone will hate this advice, but...

I measure my pH directly in the mash at like 150 F.  To adjust for temperature, I add 0.2.  So if shooting for 5.3 as measured at room temp, I shoot for 5.1 as measured in the mash.

I know, I know, shame on me, it will shorten the life of my pH meter, yadda yadda.  Yeah, but, my meter was only like $14 on Amazon.  So who the frick cares!

 ;D

Then, if pH is too low, add a teaspoon of baking soda at a time to bring it up.  If too high, add a couple tablespoons of acid (any acid, like, I use vinegar  :o  8) ) until it comes down.
I forgot the first time and put my meter in my mash.  Cracked the glass cover to the probe which fell in the mash.  I did not want risk drinking glass shards so threw the whole thing away. 

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« Last Edit: April 22, 2017, 01:30:11 AM by PharmBrewer »
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Offline Jkrehbielp

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Re: When and how to adjust mash pH
« Reply #32 on: April 23, 2017, 03:00:51 PM »
Update, brewed my first batch using Bru'n Water. 10 min into mash, pH was 5.6 so I decided not to screw around with it. Measured pH 20 min later, 5.3
Looks like Bru'n Water did a very good job for me

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Offline JJeffers09

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Re: When and how to adjust mash pH
« Reply #33 on: April 23, 2017, 03:07:06 PM »
Awesome!  Happy brewing - cheers!

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Offline mabrungard

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Re: When and how to adjust mash pH
« Reply #34 on: April 23, 2017, 06:59:42 PM »
Update, brewed my first batch using Bru'n Water. 10 min into mash, pH was 5.6 so I decided not to screw around with it. Measured pH 20 min later, 5.3
Looks like Bru'n Water did a very good job for me

I don't know why this tendency occurs, but my observations show that mash pH tends to drift toward a pH of about 5.4 over time. If it starts high and you've implemented water adjustments that should have produced a lower pH, the pH does tend to move in that direction with additional time. A similar thing seems to occur when the initial pH is low and you've implemented water adjustments that should have produced a higher pH, it rises over time. I assuming there is some sort of delayed chemical reaction occurring.

The bottom line is that if you have implemented proper pH adjustments based on accurate water information, the predicted pH is fairly likely. If a measurement is off, wait another 10 or 20 minutes and recheck.

I do have one caution, if your water mineral and acid additions aren't uniformly mixed into the WATER before adding the grain, you can easily have variation in pH across your mash bed. Add everything to the water first and mix it well before adding the grain. That is one less thing to worry about.
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