Author Topic: Matured Beers  (Read 1221 times)

Offline deadpoetic0077

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Matured Beers
« on: March 15, 2017, 06:40:27 PM »
I've seen it stated several places that some people wait for their beer to "mature" before they drink them. Are they speaking of green flavors or waiting and having one every so often until it hits a "sweet spot"? Usually I start drinking at two weeks after bottling and I see little to no change over the 2-4 weeks it takes me to get through the bottles. Tastes good to me, this is more just for general knowledge.

Offline tommymorris

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Re: Matured Beers
« Reply #1 on: March 15, 2017, 06:46:41 PM »
I start drinking after about a week. But I go slowly until I think the flavor has stabilized. I think there are significant flavor changes over the first 1-3 weeks. The beer clarifies and I think some of the stuff that drops out takes unwanted flavors with it (that's just my uneducated hypothesis).

Offline Lazy Ant Brewing

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Re: Matured Beers
« Reply #2 on: March 15, 2017, 07:03:29 PM »
I start drinking after about a week. But I go slowly until I think the flavor has stabilized. I think there are significant flavor changes over the first 1-3 weeks. The beer clarifies and I think some of the stuff that drops out takes unwanted flavors with it (that's just my uneducated hypothesis).

Flavor changes over the first 1-3 weeks .  .  .


1-3 weeks after what point in time?

End of fermentation?  Bottle carbonation? Kegging?

Thanks in advance for your answer.

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Offline tommymorris

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Re: Matured Beers
« Reply #3 on: March 15, 2017, 07:05:06 PM »
I start drinking after about a week. But I go slowly until I think the flavor has stabilized. I think there are significant flavor changes over the first 1-3 weeks. The beer clarifies and I think some of the stuff that drops out takes unwanted flavors with it (that's just my uneducated hypothesis).

Flavor changes over the first 1-3 weeks .  .  .


1-3 weeks after what point in time?

End of fermentation?  Bottle carbonation? Kegging?

Thanks in advance for your answer.
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Offline Philbrew

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Re: Matured Beers
« Reply #4 on: March 15, 2017, 08:08:49 PM »
My understanding and limited experience is that maturity varies greatly with beer type.  Some beers are best as soon as they are carbonated.  Others can take years.  Like most things in life, there is a spectrum.
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Offline yso191

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Re: Matured Beers
« Reply #5 on: March 15, 2017, 10:09:04 PM »
My understanding and limited experience is that maturity varies greatly with beer type.  Some beers are best as soon as they are carbonated.  Others can take years.  Like most things in life, there is a spectrum.

Yes.  But surprisingly for me was the realization that the beers everyone says should not be aged (APA/AIPA) do IMO need a couple of weeks to come into their own.  Stouts are a different issue.  I am drinking a barrel aged imperial stout I brewed two years ago and it shows no sign of being over the hill.
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Offline deadpoetic0077

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Re: Matured Beers
« Reply #6 on: March 16, 2017, 12:34:10 PM »
So the answer is (which I expected) it depends :P any general guidelines on that? Obviously higher alcohol beers (~8+ ?) would need some time for the alcohol flavors to round off. What else?


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Offline denny

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Re: Matured Beers
« Reply #7 on: March 16, 2017, 04:44:22 PM »
So the answer is (which I expected) it depends :P any general guidelines on that? Obviously higher alcohol beers (~8+ ?) would need some time for the alcohol flavors to round off. What else?


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I wouldn't even assume that in every case.  I recently made an 8.5% BDSA that was perfectly drinkable less then 3 weeks after brewing.
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Offline bayareabrewer

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Re: Matured Beers
« Reply #8 on: March 16, 2017, 04:52:37 PM »
So the answer is (which I expected) it depends :P any general guidelines on that? Obviously higher alcohol beers (~8+ ?) would need some time for the alcohol flavors to round off. What else?


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aside from lambic style beers, which its almost universally agreed upon that they require extended aging, I'm not sure theres an answer.
Maybe get away from the idea that beer "matures" like wine and spirits do. Beer changes. Sometimes for the better, sometimes not, but that really depends on your tastebuds. I've made  10 percent Belgian tripels that taste fine at 2 weeks and 4% saisons that seem to improve at 2 months.

Offline deadpoetic0077

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Re: Matured Beers
« Reply #9 on: March 16, 2017, 05:36:30 PM »
So truly... "It depends" :P

Thanks guys!

Offline denny

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Re: Matured Beers
« Reply #10 on: March 16, 2017, 05:47:21 PM »
So truly... "It depends" :P

Thanks guys!

It's up to you...when it tastes good, it's ready to drink!
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Offline 69franx

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Re: Matured Beers
« Reply #11 on: March 17, 2017, 01:10:28 AM »
+1, drink it when you like it

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Offline brewsumore

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Re: Matured Beers
« Reply #12 on: March 17, 2017, 04:21:23 AM »
So truly... "It depends" :P

Thanks guys!

It's up to you...when it tastes good, it's ready to drink!

This.  Also, I typically wait at least 2 weeks after kegging for my IPAs/PAs, to come together.
« Last Edit: March 17, 2017, 04:23:19 AM by brewsumore »

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Matured Beers
« Reply #13 on: March 17, 2017, 01:20:01 PM »
Another vote for 'It's ready to drink when it tastes like it is'. Beers mature differently obviously. Lagers need to be crystal clear to appreciate their flavor (aside from keller) IMO. Strong beers need a little more time, but ferment cool enough and they can be surprisingly good at a couple months, even better with time.  Past that, drink it when it tastes good.
 
 
 
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Offline SWSommer

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Re: Matured Beers
« Reply #14 on: March 23, 2017, 05:50:13 PM »
Beer flavor develops over time, but it is different for each recipe and style.  Since I am "one of those" who likes to brew a different beer every batch (will eventually repeat those I like best), I do the following:

1) On bottling day, I cap 5 bottles during the middle of the run with a different color cap.  When they go in the box, I know which ones they are.

2) 1 week after bottling, I chill one of the 5 bottles for 3 days and drink it.  This is repeated each week until I really have an urge to want to open another right then!  At that point, 1/2 of the bottles go into the fridge. 

3) I continue to open the remaining bottles from the original 5, at 1 week intervals, noting any changes in flavor.  Once the flavor stabilizes, all of the remaining bottles get chilled and consumed.

I have a Belgian Dubbel just about ready to bottle, and I am guessing that I will need to change my interval for the 5 testing bottles to 2 or 3 weeks.  I set the interval for my last Dry Irish Stout to 2 weeks, and its flavor developed nicely after 6 weeks in the bottle.                             
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