Author Topic: Yeast washing  (Read 3277 times)

Offline Phil_M

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Re: Yeast washing
« Reply #30 on: March 22, 2017, 05:36:11 PM »
FWIW, on the homebrew scale I think you're better off plating and stepping up a new culture vs. washing. Plating has the advantage of going back to something that's still definitely yeast, whereas washing you still might be stuck with whatever other microbe that's trying to rise to prominence.

Yeast may be cheap, but Mark used to mention that some strains only come into their own after being repitched 2 or 3 times, so that's a reason to repitch. Another is availability, I don't like shipping yeast during the summer, so why not repitch? I've also had no issues pitching yeast from a stout into an IPA.

And why not just buy craft beer? Because where I am it's all stale.
Corn is a fine adjunct in beer.

And don't buy stale beer.

Offline weazletoe

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Re: Yeast washing
« Reply #31 on: March 22, 2017, 07:03:20 PM »
Note to self.... never type into Google images "yeast infection" while eating lunch.
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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Yeast washing
« Reply #32 on: March 22, 2017, 07:11:14 PM »
Note to self.... never type into Google images "yeast infection" while eating lunch.


Working in the medical field, I can imagine the image wasn't very appetite friendly.   ;D
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Offline JJeffers09

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Re: Yeast washing
« Reply #33 on: March 23, 2017, 06:27:24 PM »
Why homebrew? Isn't it cheaper to go buy the craft $10 six pack off the shelf?

I actually don't think this is true, at least not for me. All said, I think it costs me about 50 cents a bottle to brew my own. And don't give me any of that "what's your time worth?" crap. I'm a teacher - everybody knows my time is worthless. ;)

(I know you're just trying to make a point. I'm just avoiding my to-do list so I thought I'd reply. Sorry to go off-topic.)
How much did you pay for the equipment?

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Just to answer your question from my perspective:

My equipment costs were paid up a looooooong time ago with today's craft beer cost.  A minimum difference of $1.50 per 12oz (homebrew vs commercial).

Let's say I spent $1500.00 on brewing equipment (I didn't; much less).
$1500/$1.50 = 1000 beers worth
1000/50 beers per 5 gallons = 20 batches

So the equipment was paid for on batch 20 (during my first year brewing) if I actually spent $1500 on equipment.  If I spent 3x that on equipment ($4500) it was paid for on batch 60 (end of second year brewing).  AND, this doesn't take into account the extra costs associated with high proof beer, specialty releases, sour beers, belgian beers, russian imperial stouts, etc.  There is HUGE savings in brewing your own beer, assuming you drink it and like it :D

So those 20 batches.  $22-$40 grist, $2.50- $13 hops, $2.50- $13 yeast, $.50 cleaning supplies, $5-6 water/adjustments, let's call maintenance on equip, $.50/batch

20($22+2.50+2.50+5+.5)= $650/1000 beers

$0.65/beer and let's say around $.37/beer macro-lager 30 rack...

Not including starters, or bottles/caps? Vs Keg, kegging equipment, upkeep, energy (not time and money electricity), fermentation vessels, infections, cleaning supplies, and how about Storage space?

I could get into the petty quibbles, however the point I was making is that there are plenty of perspectives to consider in this hobby.  If owning a yeast freezer, and vaulting your own strains, I say why not. 

Providing knowledge, therefore lending a hand on the subject to let others who are excited about yeast washing is better for the health of the forum vs  just nay saying the process.  Anyway, my $0.02 are in.  I'm gunna go back to my shenanigans.

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« Last Edit: March 23, 2017, 06:39:42 PM by JJeffers09 »
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Offline SilverZero

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Re: Yeast washing
« Reply #34 on: March 23, 2017, 06:38:45 PM »
Fair enough, but eventually we all reach a break-even point if that's our primary concern. For me, I'm not spending money on beer, I'm spending money on a hobby I enjoy, and getting free beer out of it. :)

We all choose which investments are worth it to us as individuals. I love the discussions about HOW to do something, because I love that they're there when I decide IF I want to do it. That's why I like these forums.

Offline stpug

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Re: Yeast washing
« Reply #35 on: March 23, 2017, 06:43:45 PM »
Why homebrew? Isn't it cheaper to go buy the craft $10 six pack off the shelf?

I actually don't think this is true, at least not for me. All said, I think it costs me about 50 cents a bottle to brew my own. And don't give me any of that "what's your time worth?" crap. I'm a teacher - everybody knows my time is worthless. ;)

(I know you're just trying to make a point. I'm just avoiding my to-do list so I thought I'd reply. Sorry to go off-topic.)
How much did you pay for the equipment?

Sent from my SM-N920C using Tapatalk

Just to answer your question from my perspective:

My equipment costs were paid up a looooooong time ago with today's craft beer cost.  A minimum difference of $1.50 per 12oz (homebrew vs commercial).

Let's say I spent $1500.00 on brewing equipment (I didn't; much less).
$1500/$1.50 = 1000 beers worth
1000/50 beers per 5 gallons = 20 batches

So the equipment was paid for on batch 20 (during my first year brewing) if I actually spent $1500 on equipment.  If I spent 3x that on equipment ($4500) it was paid for on batch 60 (end of second year brewing).  AND, this doesn't take into account the extra costs associated with high proof beer, specialty releases, sour beers, belgian beers, russian imperial stouts, etc.  There is HUGE savings in brewing your own beer, assuming you drink it and like it :D

So those 20 batches.  $22-$40 grist, $2.50- $13 hops, $2.50- $13 yeast, $.50 cleaning supplies, $5-6 water/adjustments, let's call maintenance on equip, $.50/batch

20($22+2.50+2.50+5+.5)= $650/1000 beers

$0.65/beer and let's say around $.37/beer macro-lager 30 rack...

Not including starters, or bottles/caps? Vs Keg, kegging equipment, upkeep, energy (not time and money electricity), fermentation vessels, infections, cleaning supplies, and how about Storage space?

I could get into the petty quibbles, however the point I was making is that there are plenty of perspectives to consider in this hobby.  If owning a yeast freezer, and vaulting your own strains, I say why not. 

Providing knowledge, therefore lending a hand on the subject to let others who are excited about yeast washing is better for the health of the forum vs  just nay saying the process.  Anyway, my $0.02 are in.  I'm gunna go back to my shenanigans.

Sent from my SM-N920C using Tapatalk

UNCLE! You win, I suck.  ;D

Offline JJeffers09

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Re: Yeast washing
« Reply #36 on: March 23, 2017, 06:46:10 PM »
No man not at all.  Noone on here sucks, that's what keeps me on the forum...

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Offline SilverZero

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Re: Yeast washing
« Reply #37 on: March 30, 2017, 10:15:43 PM »
No man not at all.  Noone on here sucks, that's what keeps me on the forum...

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Ditto that. If you want to be told you suck, go to Reddit. :)

Offline BrewBama

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Re: Yeast washing
« Reply #38 on: April 02, 2017, 02:10:17 PM »
So, I've read -1 month pitch direct, +1 month make a starter. I even noted pitching after three months. ...but if one does decide the activity is worth the ROI of all cited resources, what is the shelf life of a saved slurry?  ...and does saving and reusing a dry pitch vs a liquid pitch make a difference?


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Offline JJeffers09

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Re: Yeast washing
« Reply #39 on: April 02, 2017, 02:21:28 PM »
Shelf life is more of a - does it need nutrients to jump out if it's lag phase quickly.  Aka starter.  I have reused both us05 slurry and liquid slurry.  I have noticed no difference in those brews after harvested yeast.  I will say, I enjoy the 'purer' top crop for harvesting ale yeast.  That comes with a fermenter with a wide enough opening to get a spoon in there to harvest your goodies.

I have used a 9 month old strain, built it up and fermented away.  No issues.  Slowly build up the slurry of ~10% of the slurry you have.   So I have a 50mL slurry I build it up like I only have 5mL.  So first starter is only 25mL of wort, then after I see active fermentation I add another 100mL of wort.  Then 500mL, etc until I reach the pitch amount I want.

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« Last Edit: April 02, 2017, 02:24:59 PM by JJeffers09 »
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Offline ynotbrusum

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Re: Yeast washing
« Reply #40 on: April 04, 2017, 08:43:35 PM »
One further thing I will add regarding re-pitching of yeast:  I suggest using yeast nutrient on the pitches (initial and subsequent).  When I didn't use the Wyeast nutrient blend, the yeast seemed to perform a bit poorly (seemingly a "flabbier" beer that just lacked what I found to be the case when I used the yeast nutrient.)  It seems a small price to pay for happy yeasties. 

I could be dead ass wrong, too, as I appreciate that I may be setting myself up for bias that could overcome my senses and leading me to the conclusion of a noticeable difference.  I imagine that someone has experimented on the topic, but I don't know for sure.
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Offline Joe Sr.

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Re: Yeast washing
« Reply #41 on: April 04, 2017, 10:05:03 PM »
I've used slurry that's over one-year old.  You can do it, but it may not be optimal.  Definitely grow a starter.  I like to use yeast nutrient in starters for older slurries as they can take awhile to get going.  I don't feel like I need nutrient for the pitch, but definitely to get the starter going.

I just made two batches with old slurry (stepped up in starters) and they came out great.  It was my last re-use for both of those yeasts, though.  There's an extent to frugality beyond which even I won't go at some point.
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Offline el_capitan

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Re: Yeast washing
« Reply #42 on: April 05, 2017, 04:33:20 AM »
I'm drinking a Belgian witbier that is amazing right now.  I revived an 18 month old jar of clean slurry stored under beer.  I started with a 1L stirred starter with nutrient, which took a while to wake up and ferment.  Then I ran it through a .5 gal apple juice starter (unstirred) as a step-up batch.  I crashed it in the fridge for a week or so, then brewed with it.  It did ferment out drier than expected, finishing at 1.004, but it's a great beer. 

So, long-term yeast ranching can be done, but I don't wash my yeast either.  I just swirl up the beer and yeast after racking, then fill sterilized jars and store under the shelf in my keg fridge.