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Author Topic: New to brewing...serveral questions  (Read 6789 times)

Offline morticaixavier

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Re: New to brewing...serveral questions
« Reply #30 on: April 07, 2017, 10:22:49 am »
Gotcha.   What's the issue with hitting slightly lower and just increasing the temp?

if you've got the ability to manipulate the mash temp with a recirc then there isn't really any danger of hitting a slightly too low strike temp.

My comment was more to remove stress about overshooting.

Basic structure here:
~145-149 - a lighter body, greater attenuation, longer mash time for full conversion
~150-155 - Medium body, medium attenuation, medium mash time for full conversion
~156-162 - Greater body, lower attenuation, shorter mash time for full conversion

however, I generally concern myself with three mash temps

~148 for light bodied, or very high gravity beers
~155 for medium bodied, crisp but malty medium gravity beers
~162 for extra body in low gravity beers or straight up thickness in bigger beers.

and this is all very subtle and variable.
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Offline turfgrass

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Re: New to brewing...serveral questions
« Reply #31 on: April 07, 2017, 10:31:19 am »
I understand.   This recipe goes from the 60 min mash to 90 minute boil, but good to know.  Thanks again.

Offline denny

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Re: New to brewing...serveral questions
« Reply #32 on: April 07, 2017, 12:20:15 pm »
Gotcha.   What's the issue with hitting slightly lower and just increasing the temp?

None, really.  That's the way I aim to do it with my Grainfather.
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Offline denny

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Re: New to brewing...serveral questions
« Reply #33 on: April 07, 2017, 12:21:14 pm »
Gotcha.   What's the issue with hitting slightly lower and just increasing the temp?

if you've got the ability to manipulate the mash temp with a recirc then there isn't really any danger of hitting a slightly too low strike temp.

My comment was more to remove stress about overshooting.

Basic structure here:
~145-149 - a lighter body, greater attenuation, longer mash time for full conversion
~150-155 - Medium body, medium attenuation, medium mash time for full conversion
~156-162 - Greater body, lower attenuation, shorter mash time for full conversion

however, I generally concern myself with three mash temps

~148 for light bodied, or very high gravity beers
~155 for medium bodied, crisp but malty medium gravity beers
~162 for extra body in low gravity beers or straight up thickness in bigger beers.

and this is all very subtle and variable.

And I've found that malt has so much diastatic power these days that temp matters a lot less than it used to.  I've mashed the same recipe at 153 and 165 and gotten identical results.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell

Offline morticaixavier

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Re: New to brewing...serveral questions
« Reply #34 on: April 07, 2017, 12:26:32 pm »
Gotcha.   What's the issue with hitting slightly lower and just increasing the temp?

if you've got the ability to manipulate the mash temp with a recirc then there isn't really any danger of hitting a slightly too low strike temp.

My comment was more to remove stress about overshooting.

Basic structure here:
~145-149 - a lighter body, greater attenuation, longer mash time for full conversion
~150-155 - Medium body, medium attenuation, medium mash time for full conversion
~156-162 - Greater body, lower attenuation, shorter mash time for full conversion

however, I generally concern myself with three mash temps

~148 for light bodied, or very high gravity beers
~155 for medium bodied, crisp but malty medium gravity beers
~162 for extra body in low gravity beers or straight up thickness in bigger beers.

and this is all very subtle and variable.

And I've found that malt has so much diastatic power these days that temp matters a lot less than it used to.  I've mashed the same recipe at 153 and 165 and gotten identical results.

I do tend to use a lot of munich
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Offline turfgrass

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Re: New to brewing...serveral questions
« Reply #35 on: April 07, 2017, 12:36:57 pm »
OG and FG in beer

OG readings taken post boil?   

FG after fermentation is complete.

Offline stpug

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Re: New to brewing...serveral questions
« Reply #36 on: April 07, 2017, 12:38:11 pm »
OG and FG in beer

OG readings taken post boil?   

FG after fermentation is complete.

You got it!

Offline denny

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Re: New to brewing...serveral questions
« Reply #37 on: April 07, 2017, 01:09:29 pm »
I do tend to use a lot of munich

The recipe I was referring to used 80-90 % Munch.  It was domestic Munich, though, so if you use continental it might be different.
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Offline turfgrass

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Re: New to brewing...serveral questions
« Reply #38 on: April 08, 2017, 11:54:53 am »
okay, I was able to find a retail brew shop with most of my needed ingredients.  I did forget to write down DME for yest starter and also dextrose.   

Question about the hop additions and use of dextrose.  When I read a recipe it will something like-

Hop abc @ 60min
Hop abc @ 10 min
Hop abc @ FO, steep 30 min

Dry hop....4 days...

So, add hops at the start of the boil until completion, add hops 50 minutes into the boil until flame out.   At Flam out, steep hops for 30 minutes.  Sound right?

Dextrose. At what point is it added to the brew and what might a ratio be?   Tsp/gal


Thank you.


« Last Edit: April 08, 2017, 07:06:49 pm by turfgrass »

Offline ynotbrusum

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Re: New to brewing...serveral questions
« Reply #39 on: April 09, 2017, 06:59:18 am »
Dextrose can be added at any point from the boil to just past high Krausen in the fermentation.  It is highly frmentable and will dry out and raise the alcohol lev l in your beer.  Depending on the style, it could be used up to a pound or so in a 5 gallon recipe.  I prefer to use it sparingly.  I will use it in Belgian beers and very light American styles.
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Offline santoch

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Re: New to brewing...serveral questions
« Reply #40 on: April 09, 2017, 09:49:20 am »
Dextrose is a very common addition in an IIPA.  It helps to raise the alcohol without contributing to the body.
"Thick" IIPA becomes hard to drink.  Thinning it out makes it a lot more enjoyable.
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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: New to brewing...serveral questions
« Reply #41 on: April 09, 2017, 11:09:35 am »
Dextrose is a very common addition in an IIPA.  It helps to raise the alcohol without contributing to the body.
"Thick" IIPA becomes hard to drink.  Thinning it out makes it a lot more enjoyable.




I totally agree with all of this. Thick IIPA (or AIPA for that matter) is hard to drink IMO.




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Offline denny

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Re: New to brewing...serveral questions
« Reply #42 on: April 09, 2017, 11:27:02 am »
Dextrose is a very common addition in an IIPA.  It helps to raise the alcohol without contributing to the body.
"Thick" IIPA becomes hard to drink.  Thinning it out makes it a lot more enjoyable.

IMO, it makes the difference between an IIPA and a BW.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: New to brewing...serveral questions
« Reply #43 on: April 09, 2017, 12:14:26 pm »
Dextrose is a very common addition in an IIPA.  It helps to raise the alcohol without contributing to the body.
"Thick" IIPA becomes hard to drink.  Thinning it out makes it a lot more enjoyable.

IMO, it makes the difference between an IIPA and a BW.




Yep.
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Offline turfgrass

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Re: New to brewing...serveral questions
« Reply #44 on: April 09, 2017, 02:43:45 pm »
Is there a formula for the dextrose addition?  The clone recipe said 5%, but of what, wort volume?