Author Topic: Cascade and Chinook Terroir  (Read 2888 times)

Offline HoosierBrew

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Cascade and Chinook Terroir
« on: April 10, 2017, 10:31:16 PM »
From Stan H's blog, an interesting article about how different the character from hops like Cascade and Chinook can be when grown further and further east from the West Coast. I get the terroir thing, but didn't realize it could change so much.

http://appellationbeer.com/blog/a-hop-by-any-other-name-the-un-chinooking-of-chinook/
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Offline denny

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Re: Cascade and Chinook Terroir
« Reply #1 on: April 10, 2017, 11:24:49 PM »
I's remarkable, isn't it?
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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Cascade and Chinook Terroir
« Reply #2 on: April 10, 2017, 11:30:16 PM »
I's remarkable, isn't it?


Yeah it is. I figured there'd be differences, but not to change that drastically. Pretty cool.
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Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Cascade and Chinook Terroir
« Reply #3 on: April 11, 2017, 12:04:42 AM »
Local pros who are not big on Chinook found that they really like Chinook grown locally in MI.

Now off to read some Stan article.
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Offline reverseapachemaster

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Re: Cascade and Chinook Terroir
« Reply #4 on: April 11, 2017, 03:10:43 PM »
I can believe it. Fuggles are the same way. In England and the US they taste earthy. Grown in eastern Europe as Styrian Goldings and they are a completely different hop.

The variance across the country opens a lot of doors to "new" hops and popular hop flavors in hops that have fallen out of favor. It will be interesting to see how this not only expands demand for locally grown hops but changes the market for patented varieties that are all the rage right now.
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Offline cdawson

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Re: Cascade and Chinook Terroir
« Reply #5 on: April 11, 2017, 03:26:57 PM »
I just received a small Chinook and Cascade plant from a local hop grower here in Iowa. I excited to have just a couple hop plants to play around with. Hopefully they produce some hop flavors that I don't mind working with.

Offline pete b

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Re: Cascade and Chinook Terroir
« Reply #6 on: April 11, 2017, 04:06:59 PM »
I grow cascade here in Massachusetts and mine taste strongly of orange whereas when I buy cascade I get strong grapefruit.
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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Cascade and Chinook Terroir
« Reply #7 on: April 11, 2017, 04:18:26 PM »
I grow cascade here in Massachusetts and mine taste strongly of orange whereas when I buy cascade I get strong grapefruit.


Pretty cool, Pete. I assume orangey in a good way?
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Offline pete b

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Re: Cascade and Chinook Terroir
« Reply #8 on: April 11, 2017, 05:00:20 PM »
I grow cascade here in Massachusetts and mine taste strongly of orange whereas when I buy cascade I get strong grapefruit.


Pretty cool, Pete. I assume orangey in a good way?
Yes, in a good way, not in the pukey orange kind of way.
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Offline chumley

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Re: Cascade and Chinook Terroir
« Reply #9 on: April 12, 2017, 04:36:50 PM »
My Montana grown Cascades are as grapefruity as those grown in the PNW, even though our climates are pretty different.  I think the commonality of low humidity summers might have something to do with it.

Offline pete b

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Re: Cascade and Chinook Terroir
« Reply #10 on: April 12, 2017, 05:42:06 PM »
My Montana grown Cascades are as grapefruity as those grown in the PNW, even though our climates are pretty different.  I think the commonality of low humidity summers might have something to do with it.
That's interesting. The summers here in New England are generally quite humid, so maybe that is it. I was thinking it might have to do do with soil composition.
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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Cascade and Chinook Terroir
« Reply #11 on: April 12, 2017, 05:54:58 PM »
Yeah, pretty interesting. Like most of us know who buy hops in bulk, there can be pretty noticeable differences in hops year to year, vendor to vendor. But I wouldn't have expected that Cascade and Chinook would ever come off as tropical because of where they were grown. Cool stuff.
 
« Last Edit: April 13, 2017, 01:35:15 PM by HoosierBrew »
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Offline Phil_M

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Re: Cascade and Chinook Terroir
« Reply #12 on: April 12, 2017, 06:05:53 PM »
My homegrown cascades, and those of a friend, seem to be more lemon/generic citrus than grapefruit. The fresh aroma is definitely lemony. Very humid here, usually mid upper 90's in the summer.
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Offline b-hoppy

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Re: Cascade and Chinook Terroir
« Reply #13 on: April 13, 2017, 01:30:03 PM »
I'll agree with the whole terroir conversation.  A month or so ago while attending the Great Lakes Hop and Barley Conference a brewery located close to the event held a tasting: http://msue.anr.msu.edu/news/great_lakes_hop_barley_conference_to_feature_single_hop_craft_beer_tastings.  The unfortunate part of the exercise was the fact that the beers weren't really cleanly brewed and the majority of those who tasted them were  having a hard time finding any appreciable differences. 

I know for one, the Chinook I grow here in NEOhio are much more minty than anything coming out of PNW and those I've tried from Michigan did have a cool pineapple character and were much more different than either mine or the PNW sourced ones I've used.  Hopefully the growers in the non-traditional regions can figure it out and have long term success!

Offline dmtaylor

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Re: Cascade and Chinook Terroir
« Reply #14 on: April 13, 2017, 02:17:10 PM »
My homegrown Cascades in Wisconsin have less citrus punch, but a huge peppery spiciness.  Very nice IMO but not really a basis for a super IPA except for bittering.  Average alpha acid in my tasting experience is about 6.2% or so, which is about in line with what most would expect -- I had no trouble getting maximum IBUs in my last DIPA using a bittering addition with this estimate.
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